KAWX News

ARKANSAS LAW ENFORCEMENT WARN DRIVERS TO 'DRIVE SOBER OR GET PULLED OVER'-Labor Day Holiday Enforcement Ramped Up

 
Over the next few weeks, Arkansas law enforcement officers will participate in the national campaign to prevent impaired driving. The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over operation is underway now and will continue until Monday, Spetember 3rd.

  The intensified enforcement campaign coincides with the Labor Day holiday weekend, which is one of the deadliest times of the year for drunk-driving fatalities. According to the latest data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10,497 lives were lost in drunk-driving crashes during 2016. Statistically, that means one person is killed every 50 minutes by a drunk driver on our nation’s roads. Over the Labor Day holiday period in 2016 there were 433 traffic crash fatalities nationwide. Of the fatal crashes, more than one-third (36 percent) involved drivers who were drunk. 

  “We need motorists to understand that they must make the smart decision to drive sober - Labor Day and every day,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police and the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative. “Drunk driving is a crime that is totally preventable.” 

  During this period, law enforcement officers in Arkansas will reinforce their patrol assignments aimed at drastically reducing the number of impaired drivers who endanger themselves and others. The public will also notice an increase in state and national media messages designed to educate everyone about the dangers of drunk driving. 

  As you head out to Labor Day festivities, remember: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. The Arkansas State Police Highway Safety Office recommends the following:

    - Always plan ahead whenever you expect to drive and consume alcohol.
    - Designate a sober driver before leaving and give that person your keys.
    - If you have been drinking, call a taxi, take the bus or call a sober friend or family member to get you to your destination safely.
    - Promptly contact law enforcement to report drunk drivers you see on the roadways.
    - Always wear your seat belt.
    - If you’re on a motorcycle, use protective safety equipment.

  For more information on the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign, visit TrafficSafetyMarketing.gov or contact the Arkansas Highway Safety Office at (501) 618-8136.  For more on the ongoing “Toward Zero Deaths” campaign, visit TZDarkansas.org.
 
8-19-18 12:49 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Address: Helping Children Get a Head Start in Life

 
 
LITTLE ROCK – Experts in academic success generally agree that access to high-quality learning programs for preschool children greatly improves the potential for success in high school and beyond.
But there are families who struggle financially, and for them, the options are limited because of the cost of child care.
 
In Arkansas, low-income families can apply through the Department of Human Services for vouchers that will pay for the care of children while their parents work or attend school.
 
Employees in the division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education help families navigate the challenges and help them to find financial aid. The money for assistance programs often has been hard to come by, which means that some families must wait for help.
 
By spring of this year, Arkansas’s list of those waiting for vouchers that would pay for child care had grown to 1,400 families with more than 2,000 children. Some of those families had been waiting for more than a year.
 
I am happy to report that with a block grant of $26 million from the federal Child Care Development Fund, we have eliminated the waiting list, and we even have money left over.
 
I announced in May that we would receive the money after President Trump signed off on the grant, which increased the Child Care Development Block Grant by $5.8 billion. The Department of Human Services immediately began contacting families on the list.
 
There were 2,056 children on the list, and 1,683 of those are receiving help. The parents of the other 373 declined assistance or had moved.
 
As of today, the number of children on the list is zero. We have enough money remaining to assist others
 
The additional money from the block grant increased the number of children we can serve from about 5,300 children to more than 9,000 infants, toddlers, and children who are in pre-kindergarten or in after-school and summer break programs.
 
This is a big moment for the families of Arkansas because it gives their children a head start on life. Many of these children will join our workforce and make it stronger because of the opportunity this block grant has provided.
 
This makes this a big moment in Arkansas.
 
8-18-18   11:40 a.m.   kawx.org

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Listening to Arkansas Farmers and Ranchers

 

One of my summer traditions is traveling across Arkansas talking with agricultural producers and seeing the great work being done in our state to feed and clothe the nation and the world. The Ag Tour is a cornerstone of my work during the August in-state work period. I spend several days crossing the state to visit farms, ranches and agri-businesses to see firsthand how Washington’s decision-making is impacting their operations.

 

From Fayetteville to Dermott, the 2018 Ag Tour covered hundreds of miles to visit diverse operations such as livestock ranches, ag research stations, row crop farms, orchards and more.

 

Agriculture is an economic driver for our state. It accounts for nearly one-quarter of our state’s economic activity, making it Arkansas’s largest industry. This is one of the reasons I am proud to serve on the Senate Agriculture Committee, and why I am committed to traveling across the state to listen to people involved in the industry.

 

With many issues that directly affect the agriculture community front and center in Washington right now, the tour was very timely.

 

We are in the process of reconciling the differences between the versions of the Farm Bill passed in the Senate and the House of Representatives. As a member of the conference committee that will determine the final bill, it is vital that I have input directly from producers to ensure it meets the needs of Arkansas’s agriculture community.

 

The farm economy and rural America have been struggling for the past few years. Passage of a Farm Bill would protect key risk management tools and provide certainty for our agricultural producers. I look forward to delivering this certainty and predictability to our farmers and ranchers.

 

The current trade environment was also heavily discussed. There is an understandable anxiety amongst farmers and producers over the rising tensions between the U.S. and some of our trading partners. 

 

No one wants a trade war. However, the producers I spoke with agreed action was needed to push back on unfair trading partners like China. While every farmer we met with said they appreciate President Trump’s efforts to support the producers caught up in the standoff, they stressed that “trade over aid” is what is needed for a long-term solution. Farmers want Washington to protect the markets they have and work to open new ones. Given a level playing field, our agricultural producers can compete with anyone.

 

The farmers and ranchers I visited with were also very supportive of our efforts to reduce the regulatory burdens family farmers and producers were saddled with by the previous administration. Sensible regulations benefit every American, but excessive rules that defy commonsense hurt the agriculture industry. More work remains to rollback unnecessary regulation, but the progress we have made is having a positive effect.

 

As we continue our work in Washington to help create an environment that allows our farmers and ranchers to succeed, it is important that we take direction from those whose livelihoods are directly impacted. There simply is no substitute for visiting with the hardworking Arkansans who work the land. I look forward to taking what I learned from them during my agriculture tour to craft smart and effective policies that will benefit them and help our entire state.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-17-18 6:07 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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Polk County Election Commission Sets Meeting - November Ballot Positions Drawing

 

The Polk County Election Commission will meet next Thursday, August 23rd, 2018, at 9:00 a.m., according to Polk County Clerk Terri Harrison. The purpose of this meeting is to draw for ballot positions for the November General Election.  All meetings are open to the public and all candidates are invited to attend.  

 

8-17-18 6:01 p.m. kawx.org 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Do you know what goals your child should be setting for this school year?  Do you know what mental health services are available at your child’s school?

 

These are just a couple of topics that parents and teachers should be discussing in the first weeks of school.  But remembering to approach every topic while finding classrooms and gathering school supplies can be overwhelming.

 

That is part of the reason why the Department of Education began the “My Child/My Student” campaign. 

 

The goal of this campaign, in its fifth year, is to encourage positive and productive communication between parents and teachers. Ongoing communication builds a support network that encourages student learning and success.

 

The campaign highlights a college and career readiness topic and student safety topic each month during the campaign, which begins in August and ends in May. Resources and links to helpful information for parents and teachers are posted at www.arkansased.gov and ADE's social media throughout the school year. The 2018-2019 Topics List is available and provides questions for parents and teachers to consider when communicating with each other.  

 

The topics for August include setting goals and school bus safety.

 

Parents and teachers are encouraged to discuss answers to the following:

 

·      What goals should my child/my student set for this school year?

·      What resources are available to help my child/my student if he/she is struggling to reach goals? 

·      How will progress be measured, communicated and celebrated?

·      What school bus safety tips should I share with my child/my student?

 

Recommended topics for September include Reading Initiative for Student Excellence (RISE) and Mental Health Awareness.

 

Research is clear: grades and attendance are directly impacted by a parent’s involvement. We encourage parents to take advantage of the resources available from ADE to help make guide your participation.

 

8-17-18 5:50 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 17, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Last year the Arkansas Economic Development Commission agreed to offer financial incentives for 133 new projects.

 

They will create an estimated 3,460 jobs with average salaries of $21.81 an hour. The companies that received financial incentives from the state will invest about $3.184 billion in Arkansas.

 

Legislation approved in 2001 requires the AEDC to submit regular reports to lawmakers detailing the effectiveness of the numerous tax incentives and financial assistance programs that state government uses to recruit industry. Also, the AEDC reports on the economic climate in Arkansas compared to neighboring states.

 

After AEDC officials signed agreements in 2017 to provide assistance for 133 new projects, it increased the total of AEDC projects to 256. That compares to a total of 206 projects in 2015 and 210 projects in 2016.

 

Signing 133 agreements last year represents a tremendous improvement over recent years. In 2015, the AEDC signed offers with 118 companies and in 2016 it finalized agreements with 88 companies.

 

The total investment value of the 256 projects in Arkansas that received AEDC assistance is more than $7 billion. The total number of jobs added to the Arkansas economy since 2015, with help from AEDC programs, is 12,805. Their average salary is $20.81 an hour.

 

According to U.S. Commerce Department figures, jobs created with the assistance of AEDC incentives pay higher average salaries than other Arkansas jobs.

 

The unemployment rate in Arkansas in May was 3.8 percent, near to historic lows.

 

The legislature has approved numerous incentives to help the AEDC recruit new industries, and to encourage existing industries in the state to expand.

 

Some incentives are based on payroll, so a company that creates high-paying jobs will qualify for more tax breaks.

 

Other incentives, particularly in the manufacturing sector, offer sales tax exemptions for equipment and machinery, and for electricity and natural gas costs. Other incentives specifically target high-tech firms, and offer tax incentives for their research and development costs.

 

The state also offers help with job training and infrastructure, such as rail spurs, water and drainage systems, preparation of land and access roads.

 

Two years ago, Arkansas voters greatly expanded the state’s capacity to issue economic development bonds when they approved Issue 3, which had been placed on the ballot by the legislature.

 

The constitutional amendment removed the former cap of 5 percent of general revenue that limited the amount of general obligation bonds the state could issue at one time. Removal of the cap allows the state to finance more than one large project at a time, if the legislature approves.

 

The amendment also granted local governments more flexibility to issue economic development bonds, by allowing them to work with local chambers of commerce and in collaboration with neighboring cities and counties.

 

The AEDC has programs specifically designed to promote small businesses, innovative technology businesses and firms owned by minorities and women. Also, it has an office that works to promote the filming of movies in Arkansas, and an office that works to expand and strengthen military installations.

 

8-17-18 5:46 p.m. kawx.org 

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Bear Hunting Seminar Slated For Fort Smith Nature Center

 

FORT SMITH - Myron Means, large carnivore program coordinator for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, will host a seminar dedicated to hunting black bears at the Janet Huckabee Arkansas River Valley Nature Center from 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday Aug. 30.

 

Means will present every aspect of hunting Natural State bears from scouting and bear behavior, to field preparation for the hunt and care of harvested bears should a hunter score.

 

“This will basically be like Bear Hunting 101,” Means said. “If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears, I’ll try to give you every bit of knowledge you need, but success will still hinge on how much effort you put into the hunt itself.”

 

Participants will get a crash course in bear physiology and what motivates bears during hunting season.

 

“Bear hunting really is all about finding food,” Means said. “They don’t have a rut during the fall like deer, but are about to go into their den cycle so they’re focused on one thing - eating.”

 

Means will help hunters use this knowledge to increase their chances of harvesting a bear, with tactics developed for private and public land hunters.

 

“We’ll cover baiting sites and how to pattern bears on private land,” Means said. “But we’ll also cover public land hunting, where baiting is not allowed.”

 

Finding bears on public land still revolves around finding food sources, but it requires much more work in scouting. Means says if acorns and other foods are plentiful, the bears will not need to move much to eat. During low mast years, they’ll move more and focus harder on particular trees that may still be producing acorns. 

 

“The secret is finding these ‘natural bait sites’ and scouting them without disturbing bears that may be feeding,” Means said. “Bears are much less forgiving than deer. If you bust them out scouting, they won’t be back. On private land bait sites, you can get away with a little more, but on public land you have to really minimize your presence.”

 

Means says focusing your scouting on late morning and early afternoon improves the chances of not running into a bear before hunting season. Hunters should look for areas with good mast crop and telltale signs of bears visiting, such as bear droppings or scat and bear trails. Bear trails are easily distinguished from deer and other game trails by the presence of small, dished out impressions from repeated footsteps in the same spot.

 

“Bears will step in nearly the exact same spot every time they travel a trail,” Means said. “So it will literally look like you went and put down a bunch of saucers in alternating patterns on each side of the trail.”

 

The seminar also will address what to do if your new knowledge pays off. Hunters can be intimidated by the idea of having this massive bear down and not knowing what to do with it to take care of their trophy. 

 

“Bears are much different than deer and can spoil quickly if not cared for properly,” Means said. “The fat layer they are putting on when gorging themselves can be very oily. Combined with them putting on their winter coats, a downed bear’s fat layer can begin rendering itself from the animal’s trapped body heat. That oil can saturate the meat and taint it with an unpleasant flavor.”

 

Means says hunters after bears should prepare for success and have coolers, plenty of sharp knives and rope waiting in the truck should they hit their mark. Acting quickly to skin, quarter and cool the bear is the key to great meals later.

 

“You also want to get as much of that extrastitial (outer) fat layer off as you can before storage,” Means said. “There’s enough marbling in a bear’s muscles to give the meat flavor and prevent it from drying out while cooking. That outer layer just adds too much and has an unpleasant taste.”

 

“Proper field care and processing of a bear can make it the best wild game you’ve ever eaten, but it’s definitely more work than a whitetail,” Means said. “We want everyone interested in these amazing animals to have the knowledge they need to succeed.”

 

8-15-18 3:33 p.m. kawx.org

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Weekly Fishing Report

Click on the area below that you are interested in.

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 15, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-15-18 3:20 p.m. kawx.org 

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The Notice of Intent Deadline Is Almost Here

 

 

Tomorrow is the deadline to file you annual Notice of Intent to Home School.

Arkansas law requires home schoolers to give their local school districts written notice of their intent to home school every year. The deadline to file your Notice of Intent to Home School is August 15.

There are two ways to file your Notice of Intent:

1. You can file the Notice of Intent form electronically via the Department of Education's website by clicking here. You can find helpful instructions for filing the Notice of Intent online by clicking here.

2. You can download and print a paper copy of the Notice of Intent to Home School by clicking here. Paper forms must be sent to your local public school district superintendent's office. You can hand-deliver the form to your superintendent's office, or you can mail it.

If you have questions about filing the Notice of Intent, contact our office via email or at 501-978-5503.

 

8-14-18      11:35 a.m.      kawx.org

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ARKANSAS STATE TROOPERS LOOKING FOR RECRUITS TO FILL 2019 ACADEMY CLASS

 
 
AUGUST 14, 2018
  The Arkansas State Police is looking for eligible recruits to fill the 2019 academy class. Qualified individuals will be selected to enter the Arkansas State Police Recruit Academy, with a start date of February 24, 2019.

   “If you have what it takes to become an Arkansas State Trooper, we want to meet you,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police.  “If you are selected, you will find yourself on the path of one of the most rewarding careers imaginable.” 

   The expectations placed on Arkansas State Troopers are extraordinary, and that is why the Arkansas State Police has the highest required standards for applicants. Minimum qualifications to be considered are:  

    - Must be a United States citizen and at least 21 years of age.
   - Must possess a medical release to participate in a physical fitness test.
   - Must possess a current and valid driver license.
   - Must be a certified high school graduate or possess a GED equivalency.
   - Must meet visual acuity requirements. 
   - Never convicted of a felony criminal charge.
   - Never convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence charge.
   - Pass a comprehensive background check.
   - No tattoos shall be visible on an applicant’s body that could be seen if wearing the uniform of  an Arkansas State Trooper.  

  The Arkansas State Police Recruit Academy is a 21 week intense training environment, designed to teach our recruits the job skills necessary to perform the duties of a trooper. Those selected to attend our academy will receive more than 1,000 hours of training covering all aspects of law enforcement. 

   Recruits begin earning a salary after being offered a position by the Director of the Arkansas State Police and reporting to the academy.  The entry salary for an Arkansas State Trooper Recruit is $40,340.  Following four and ½ years of service, a trooper becomes eligible for promotion to the rank of Trooper First Class, receiving a salary increase of 10% or an increase to the entry pay level of $45,010, whichever is greater.  Upon seven and ½ years of service a trooper is promoted to the rank of corporal, awarded a 10% raise or an increase to the entry pay level of $50,222, or whichever is greater.  

   Benefits include:  
    - Healthcare insurance is paid by the state for a trooper (recruit) and family
   - Certificate pay up to $1,200 annually (*state police director discretion)
   - Retirement contributions are paid by the state.
   - Uniforms and equipment are furnished.
   - Eligible for career service pay following ten years of state service.

  Interested applicants are encouraged to visit the Arkansas State Police web site at www.asp.arkansas.gov, where they can find all the forms necessary to start the hiring process. The recruiting page also provides applicants a means to directly contact a recruiter. 
 
8-14-18   10:52 a.m.   kawx.org

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For August 6th - 12th

SHERIFF’S LOG FOR AUGUST 6th - 12th
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of August 6, 2018 – August 12, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
August 6, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 8 East in Board Camp of the theft of $200.00 in cash. Investigation continues.
Report of a disturbance that had occurred earlier on Highway 71 South in
Cove. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 270 near Eagleton of the break-in and theft of equipment, valued at $30,000.00. Investigation continues.
Report of a possible violation of an Order of Protection. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Polk 295 near Hatfield of damage done to a rental property. Deputy responded.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Rita D. Labbe, 57, of Wickes, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Crystal D.
Morgan, 30, of Wickes, on Charges of DWI, Driving Left of Center, No Driver’s License and Refusal to Submit.
 
August 7, 2018
Report from a Hatfield woman of a missing family member. The individualwas later located.
Report from a Mena woman of child custody issues. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on North Lewis Street in Cove of possible identity theft. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Bobby E. Hedrick, 47, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 8, 2018
Report from complainant on School Street in Cove of vandalism done to a camper and a vehicle. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 277 near Vandervoort of the break-in and theft of a computer and three firearms. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Harris Road near Hatfield of identity fraud, totaling losses at $664.37. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
August 9, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 93 near Rocky of the theft of a vehicle, valued at $2,000.00. Arrested was Allen D. Phillips, 49, of Mena, on a Charge of Theft of Property.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Levi A. Wilson, 22, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 10, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 114 in Acorn of damage done to two water meters. Investigation continues.
Report from a Mena man of a possible violation of an Order of Protection. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Hatfield of a scam on social media, totaling losses at $400.00.
Arrested was Matthew E. Cannon, 38, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 11, 2018
Report from complainant on Fretz Lane near Mena of the theft of 16 garden plants.
Report from complainant on Highway 246 West in Hatfield of the theft of jewelry, valued at $2,000.00. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Alissha A. Jamieson, 26, of Fort Smith, on a Charge of Obstructing Governmental Operations.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Joshua C. Stephenson, 26, of Shreveport, LA, on Charges of Following too Close, Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Violation of a Protection Order.
 
August 12, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Potter of vandalism done to a vehicle, totaling losses at $50.00. Investigation continues.
Report from a Waldron woman of issues with child visitation regarding children residing in Polk County.
Report from complainant on Polk 655 near Yocana of the theft of a tractor. Investigation continues.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Dylan G. Morgan, 26, of Mena, on Charges of DWI, Speeding, No Driver’s License, Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance and Refusal to Submit.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Teiona Kimbrough, 39, of Mena, on Charges of Public Intoxication, Disorderly Conduct and Obstructing Governmental Operations.
Arrested was Steven L. Stroud, 54, of Mena, on three Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 22 Incarcerated Inmates, with 4 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00536
 
8-13-18 4:50 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson Weekly Radio Address: Listening to AR Farmers

 
 
LITTLE ROCK – I’m fresh off a two-day road trip through southwest Arkansas. This is the second year for my Ag Tour, which allows me to pull off my tie and listen to the concerns of our farmers. I also hear many stories of their success as stewards of Arkansas’s biggest industry.
 
Farmers and agriculture are the backbone of our economy. They work long hours seven days a week. In addition to talking about the normal risks and challenges of farming, we discussed a different challenge that has been in the news lately – tariffs, which pose a real risk of retaliatory action against agriculture.
 
Our farmers are rightly concerned about the effect of tariffs on the export of their crops. But what I heard from them during my Ag Tour is that they are willing to give the strategy some time to work. Farmers understand that President Trump is trying to achieve more fairness in our trading relationships.
 
The effect of the administration’s position is cause for optimism. In regard to NAFTA, we appear close to a modernized agreement that acknowledges the importance of continued North American Trade.  We’ve worked with the EU to set mutual goals to reduce tariffs. And even in the midst of the escalating trade war with China, its leaders have softened and agreed to rebalance trade and to buy more of our agricultural commodities.
 
These negotiations are encouraging, but our patient farmers know that a prolonged trade war will take a significant toll by diminishing their foreign sales and by discouraging direct foreign investment. We support the president, but we hope he can declare victory soon.
 
Closer to home, Ag Tour 2018 happened to coincide with the Farmers Market Week in Arkansas. If you want to talk to a farmer, you don’t have to tour the state. There are farmers as close as your nearest Farmer’s Market, where you can buy corn, squash, watermelons, purple hulls, and peaches without paying a tariff.
 
Arkansas agriculture produces everything from the meat and vegetables we put on our supper tables, the wood we build our tables with, and the cotton we weave into the clothes we wear to the table. Thank you for your hard work and your willingness to face the risks such as the destruction of your crops by extreme weather to the perils of international political tiffs over tariffs.
 
8-13-18 6:59 a.m. kawx.org

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

A recent survey conducted with 1,400 adults found that only one-third could name all three branches of government.  Only 37% of those surveyed can name rights guaranteed under the First Amendment.

 

This is not the only study that shows a need for more civics education.  Studies also tell us that there is a clear relationship between informed citizens and active participation in government. That is just one of the reasons why we take the month of September to visit with schools in our district.

 

In the 2015 Regular Session, the Arkansas General Assembly passed a resolution designating September as annual “Take Your Legislator to School Month”.   In addition to helping students learn more about the legislative process, this bipartisan initiative was also motivated by a need for members to fully understand the issues and challenges facing public schools.  It also gives districts an opportunity to showcase innovative solutions developed by our educators.

 

The resolution encourages public school districts to plan special events with their local legislators.  Examples could include allowing legislators to visit classrooms, reading to students, or present guest lectures. Districts could also sponsor panel discussions in which administrators and teachers discuss issues facing their schools. 

 

The information we learn from this face to face interaction becomes invaluable during the legislative session. Our education committee hears testimony on hundreds of bills every session. Knowing the needs of our schools in advance helps guide our decision making process in a fast-paced environment.

 

On our website, www.arkansashouse.org, we have a section titled “Kids in the House”.  There you will find all the materials your local school district will need to take advantage of this opportunity.  In the materials, we have included a spreadsheet listing the members who represent all 257 districts in our state.

 

We hope all of you have a great first week back to school. 

 

8-10-18 4:54 p.m. kawx.org 

 

 

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Schools Cannot Prevent Student Prayer: State Commissioner of Education's Memo

 

This week Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key issued an annual memo to public school superintendents statewide reminding them that schools that receive federal funds cannot stop students from engaging in “constitutionally protected prayer in public schools.”

Public schools must file paperwork verifying that the school has no policy in place that would prevent students from praying at school.

While courts have ruled that teachers cannot lead students in prayer in the classroom, the Constitution and federal law generally protect students’ rights to pray, read scripture, and form religious groups or clubs on campus, provided that they do not disrupt school activities. Students also are free to talk about religion or their religious beliefs as part of a relevant class assignment or with their friends during lunch or other free times at school.

That is why Family Council supports activities like Bring Your Bible to School Day, and it’s why we have said students are free to talk about Jesus or their church if a teacher asks them to write a paper about what’s important to them.

Commissioner Key’s memo is a good reminder that students do not check their religious liberties at the door when they walk into a schoolhouse.

8-10-18  2:08p.m.  kawx.org

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FDA Contracts With Company to Use Aborted Fetal Remains in Research

 

In August of 2016 the National Institutes of Health announced it wanted to use public funds for research to create human-animal hybrids or “chimeras.” The goal was to inject human stem cells into modified animal embryos in hopes of discovering new cures or “growing” human organs for transplant patients.

 

At the time the news sounded like nothing less than something out of a supermarket tabloid. Two years later, however, we’ve learned the Food and Drug Administration is apparently contracting with a group in California to inject mice with tissue obtained from aborted babies.

 

In June the FDA announced it was awarding a contract to Advanced Bioscience Resources, Inc., “to acquire Tissue for Humanized Mice.”

 

The announcement went on to say “[Advanced Bioscience Resources, Inc.] is the only company that can provide the human fetal tissue needed to continue the ongoing research being led by the FDA. Fresh human tissues are required for implantation into severely immune-compromised mice to create chimeric animals that have a human immune system.”

In other words, Advanced Bioscience Resources will be providing the FDA with fetal tissue that it can use in research — and the fetal tissue almost certainly is being harvested from aborted babies.

 

8-10-18  2:06 p.m.  kawx.org

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 
Helping Student Veterans Learn and Succeed
 
Student veterans will have new education benefits to use this school year as they pursue their career goals. This investment in our veterans provides them with more tools and resources to prepare them for civilian life.
 
In 2017, Congress approved and the president signed the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act (Forever GI Bill). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) continues to implement these education benefit improvements designed to better serve veterans’ needs today.
 
Several provisions took effect at the beginning of August, including making post-9/11 Purple Heart recipients eligible for full education benefits for up to three years, updating eligibility requirements for Guard and Reservist service and reallocating education benefits to surviving family members.
 
We’ve worked to modernize the education benefit and equip members of the workforce with the skills they need for 21st century jobs. That’s why the Forever GI Bill updates include opportunities to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs, computer programming and career technical training.
 
I was pleased to author a provision in the legislation to open doors to training and jobs for veterans reentering the workforce. Promoting technical skills such as computer coding and programming is a win-win for veterans and employers.
 
As a member of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, I am monitoring the VA’s implementation of the Forever GI Bill and I will continue to provide oversight to ensure veterans have access to the lifetime education benefits they earned.
 
We know that there is still work to do to break down barriers standing between veterans and their education benefits. Delays in the processing of tuition payments - by the VA’s unintentionally slow processing or errors by school certifying officials - have caused some student veterans to endure financial hardship and be denied access to higher education. That’s why I introduced the Servicemembers Improved Transition through Reforms for Ensuring Progress (SIT-REP) Act.
 
Our veterans deserve certainty when it comes to their education benefits. Eliminating financial burdens and ensuring access to school facilities is a commonsense step in supporting our student veterans. This bipartisan legislation will prevent veterans from being held responsible for fees and penalties associated with delays in the processing of tuition payments and allow them to focus on their education rather than financial obligations.
 
This is especially important given that the implementation of the Forever GI Bill may result in a higher volume of claims that must be processed by the VA and schools. 
 
Similar legislation passed the House of Representatives in May. I am hopeful that we can continue that momentum by passing this legislation in the Senate.
 
We have a responsibility to honor our promise to those who stood in defense of our nation. Updates to veterans’ education benefits help empower these men and women in their transition to civilian life. I look forward to working with my colleagues to continue our commitment to improve veteran resources.
 
8-10-18   12:41p.m.   kawx.org
 
 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague-911 System Upgrades

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 10, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Every day in Arkansas more than 6,500 calls are made to 911.

 

Legislators heard a request for upgrades to the 911 system at a recent meeting, from a coalition of state, city and county officials who work in emergency management.  The name of the new system is New Generation 911, or simply NG 911.

 

The rapid growth in cell phone use is an example of how 911 systems are constantly adapting to new technologies.

 

More than 90 percent of the emergency calls made today are from cell phones. It seems as if every day, new phones expand our capacity to transmit images, videos, charts and graphs. Telephones became cell phones, which became mobile devices.

 

The innovations are driven by consumer demand and by marketing on the part of telephone companies. They’re possible because of advances in digital technology.

 

Yet most 911 calls made in Arkansas must travel along an analog circuit at least once before they reach an emergency dispatcher and the equipment that can locate the geographic source of the calls.

In states like Arkansas, which are trying to upgrade their 911 call systems, emergency responders point to an incident that occurred in North Carolina in 2016. Outdated technology was a factor when it took 11 minutes for responders to arrive, even though they were less than a mile away when the man called 911.

 

When the infrastructure of our 911 systems was created, landlines were the norm. Emergency dispatchers could pinpoint the source of a call from a landline, but not calls made with cell phones.

After the nationwide boom in cell phone use in the 1990s, federal regulations and upgrades by telephone companies allowed 911 dispatchers to trace the location of calls from cell phones.

But new technologies are becoming popular, such as messaging over social media and the Internet. The ability of current 911 systems in Arkansas has almost come to the point where it can no longer adapt to the flood of new technologies.

 

The response times of emergency dispatchers varies across Arkansas. The 6,500 emergency calls made in the state each day are routed to 127 call centers, officially known as Public Safety Answering Points. For example, in Craighead County in 2015, the county’s only PSAP handled more than 70,000 emergency calls. That same year, one of the six PSAPs in Lonoke County handled fewer than 3,000 calls.

 

Next Generation 911 will speed the routing of calls between the various local call centers.

 

Supporters of a new Next Generation 911 would like the legislature to authorize a single state agency to coordinate new technologies into a statewide network, so that the numerous separate local systems can connect more effectively.

 

They also would like an additional funding source. Phone users pay a charge on their monthly bills to support 911 services, but they generate only about half of the revenue needed to pay for the operating costs of the various systems in Arkansas. City and county governments pay for the remainder from local tax funds.

 

According to its supporters, other states are designating a state agency to implement Next Generation 911. They have saved money and increased efficiency by making a single state agency responsible, rather than waiting for numerous local systems to pay for adaptations to their systems.

 

8-10-18 9:32 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 8, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-8-18   1:20 p.m.     kawx.org

 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Don't Get Schooled by Credit Card Debt

ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Don’t Get Schooled by Credit Card Debt

 
LITTLE ROCK – Many young adults entering college or the workforce feel the pressure of looming bills and turn to credit cards to cover the initial costs but end up paying exorbitant rates long-term. Understanding that credit cards are not free and will only alleviate temporary financial burdens is an important concept for newly independent students. Accumulating credit card debt is avoidable; unfortunately, new users often fall victim to debt that hurts their ability to invest in personal pursuits like obtaining home loans and other financing in later years.
 
“Credit cards can be helpful but new users may not be fully aware of the costly terms and conditions,” says Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “Forgetting to make a payment or exceeding a card’s limit can be devastating to a consumer’s credit score, having a detrimental impact on long-term plans to buy a house or car.” 
 
As preventative strategies to young adults interested in applying for a credit card, Rutledge offers this advice when using a card:

  • Submit payments on time. Making regular payments is the best way to improve a credit score and qualify for less expensive credit.
  • Pay the whole balance owed if possible. Although it may seem easier to pay the minimum, doing so costs more in the long run, and it will take much longer to pay off the debt.
  • Do not “max out” a credit card. Charging the full credit limit is risky, and it will affect a consumer’s credit score.
  • Do not respond to every tempting credit card offer. Using too much credit could lead to having uncontrollable debt.
  • Read the fine print as some credit cards include expensive annual fees and higher interest rates in exchange for incentives like airline miles and bonus points. Some credit cards offer other services such as lower annual percentage rates, insurance and other items at no cost.

To protect college students from coercive credit card companies and debt, the Arkansas General Assembly enacted legislation in 1999 that restricts the practice of marketing credit cards on college campuses.
 
College students are further protected by the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act, which restricts the marketing of credit cards on campuses nationwide. The advertisement of credit card within 1,000 feet of a college campus or university event is prohibited. In addition, consumers under the age of 21 are required to include a parent’s signature, further binding the parent or guardian to repay debt incurred by the account. Credit card companies are also forbidden from using gifts as a form of persuasion to bribe younger consumers into applying for a card.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-8-18  1:12 p.m.  kawx.org

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Mena Schools To Give Away Gas Grill At Polk County Fair

 

Mena Schools is gearing up for the upcoming Polk County Fair for the week of August 27-September 1, 2018.  Vicky Maye, Parent/Family Engagement Coordinator for Mena Public Schools is pictured with Wal-Mart Associate, Etta Cottman with the gas grill that will be the big door prize for Mena Schools fair booth this year.  Maye states, "A big shout out to Wal-Mart for their continued support for this big event.  It's an exciting time of year for our community!  I love the ole saying that nothing makes you feel more like a kid than the county fair!  Our theme for our booth this year is focusing on the importance of schools, families and community being engaged as a team to educating the whole child as we strive to stay connected in keeping the heart in our homes, schools and community! We look forward to seeing you at our booth at the Polk County Fair!" 

 

8-8-18 10:46 a.m. kawx.org 

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Prayer Walk At Mena and Acorn Schools Sunday, August 12th

8-8-18 8:18 a.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Business, 113 Year Old Mena Landmark Destroyed By Fire

 

Mena Fire Department was paged out just after noon today to a structure fire on De Queen Street in Mena. Someone attempting to return shipping blankets to Sanders Moving and Storage noticed smoke coming from the two story building and reported it. When firemen first arrived there was only occasional smoke coming from the building. Entry was made through the front of the building, which was locked, and soon afterward large plumes of smoke started coming out of the structure, and eventually large flames consumed it. Firemen prevented the spread to nearby structures, but as a precaution a number of downtown businesses were evacuated. Several firemen were treated on the scene when they became overheated, one was taken to the local hospital for treatment. The heat index in Mena at 3:00 p.m. was 103°. Mena, Potter, Cherry Hill, Ink and Dallas Valley Fire Departments responded, as well as the Mena Police Department, Polk County Sheriff's Department, and Southwest EMS. The structure is a total loss and the cause of the fire is unknown and will be investigated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-7-18 8:18 p.m. kawx.org 

 

 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For July 30th thru August 5th

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 30, 2018 – August 5, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
July 30, 2018
Report from a Mena man of problems regarding child custody exchange. Report from complainant on Highway 375 East near Mena of a vehicle that was on fire. Deputy responded.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Jordan E. Hunter, 25, of Mena, on a Charge of DWI.
 
July 31, 2018
Report from complainant on Cemetary Road in Hatfield of a break-in and vandalism done to a building, totaling losses at $500.00. Investigation continues.
 
August 1, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 8 East in Board Camp of the theft of a tow dolly, valued at $1,500.00. Investigation continues.
Arrested was James P. Obrien, 57, of Hatfield, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 2, 2018
Report from complainant on Penny Lane near Mena of being scammed via social media, totaling losses at $1,235.41. The money was refunded by an internet pay service.
Arrested was Jonathan R. Spurkosky, 35, of Mena, on a Warrant for Rape.
 
August 3, 2018
Report from Polk County Road Department of a tractor that had been moved by an unauthorized person, causing damage to several road signs. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Jonathan M. Tidwell, 39, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Domestic Battery 3rd Degree.
Arrested was Kerry D. Johnson, 28, of Booneville, on Warrants for Probation Violation and Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Kymberlie A. Chaney, 21, of Mena, on Warrants for Probation Violation and Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 4, 2018
Report of trash being dumped along Polk 32 near Vandervoort. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a disturbance in the Polk County Detention Center. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Stone Lane near Acorn of being harassed by acquaintances. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Carissa A. Dowdy, 21, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Assault 3rd Degree.
 
August 5, 2018
Report from a Mena woman of problems regarding child custody exchange.
Report of a disturbance on Dover Street in Hatfield. Deputies responded. Complainant refused to press charges.
Report from complainant on James Gang Lane near Board Camp of an unauthorized person on their property. Deputy responded.
Report from complainant on Highway 375 East near Mena of an assault that had occurred in Oklahoma. All information was forwarded to the proper authorities.
Report of an assault on Polk 76 East near Mena. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked four vehicle accidents this week.
 
Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 19 Incarcerated Inmates, with 3 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00513
 
8-6-18 3:47 p.m. kawx.org 

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Arkansas Agriculture Department to Provide Livestock Market News Reporting

 

Arkansas Agriculture Department to Provide Livestock Market News Reporting

 

LITTLE ROCK, AR – The Arkansas Agriculture Department (AAD) has signed a cooperative agreement with the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) to serve as the state partner  for the Livestock Market News reporting program. Beginning August 1, AAD employees will collect data at livestock auctions across the state to be used by AMS to create daily and weekly reports for the cattle industry to measure local, state, and regional market trends. 

 

“The Arkansas Agriculture Department is proud to partner with the AMS to provide information that will help Arkansas cattlemen make informed marketing decisions based on reliable data,” says Arkansas Agriculture Secretary Wes Ward. “Livestock market news reporting is another way that we can equip our farmers and ranchers with the best available tools to help make their operations as competitive and profitable as possible.”

 

Daily and weekly market reports will be listed at the USDA website, here, and at the AAD website, here.   A voicemail update of the report will be available on August 1, 2018 by calling 501-823-1728.   An overview of the Arkansas Livestock Market News reporting program is available, here.

 

Livestock market news reporters will collect industry-specific data from five Arkansas livestock auctions in August and will add three additional auctions in September. The eight Arkansas livestock auctions with market reporters include Arkansas Cattle Auction Company, Searcy; Ash Flat Livestock Auctions, Ashflat; Benton County Sale Barn, Siloam Springs; County Line Sale Barn, Ratcliff; Hope Livestock Auction, Hope; North Arkansas Livestock Auction, Green Forest; and Ouachita Livestock Market, Ola; I-40 Livestock Auction, Ozark. Find a full list of all Arkansas livestock auctions, here.

 

“Livestock Auction Reports have been referenced for years by Arkansas cattlemen as a dependable, consistent source of information for local, regional, and state cattle prices,” said Cody Burkham, Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President. This is one of the most valuable resources of industry-specific information to our cattle families for herd growth and management, and we are pleased to see it continue in circulation through the partnership with the Arkansas Agriculture Department.”

 

The AAD previously hosted the Livestock Market News reporting program until the mid-1970s when the duties were transferred to the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service (UAEX). “The Cooperative Extension Service was glad to host it for the last 40 years as a service to our clients and it’s good to have it return to its original home,” said Dr. Vic Ford, Interim Associate Director-Agriculture and Natural Resources-Extension with UAEX.

 

With questions about the Livestock Market News reporting program, call James Ward at 501-823-1711.

 

8-6-18 2:58 p.m. kawx.org

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Lee Olin Cauthron Obituary

Lee Olin Cauthron

March 9, 1943 - August 4, 2018

 

Lee Olin Cauthron, age 75, of Mena, died Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the Mena Regional Health System. He was born on Tuesday, March 9, 1943 to Olin and Lela Beatrice Jordan Cauthron in Hatton, Arkansas.

Lee was a man of God, always willing to share his faith and reach the lost and point them to Christ. Lee was a Baptist by faith and loved the Lord. During Lee's working years he was a manager for Safeway Grocery Stores, Wal-Mart and Dollar General Stores over 30 plus years. Some of his hobbies were farming and raising his Mastiff and Yorkies. Lee will be missed by all who knew him.

He is preceded in death by his parents and his twin brother, James Cauthron.

Lee is survived by his son and daughter in law, Jeffrey and Dawn Cauthron of Augusta, Georgia; his daughter and son in law, Sherri and Dr. Bill McCourtney of Mena; two sisters, Margaret Qayyum of Glendale Heights, Illinois and Susan Morrison of Chicago, Illinois; nine grandchildren, Tabithia Cauthron of Grovetown, Georgia, Steven Cauthron of Camp Humphreys, South Korea; Logan and Emily McCourtney of Success, Arkansas, Blake McCourtney of Jonesboro, Arkansas, Dalton McCourtney, Nicholas McCourtney, Harlei McCourtney, Kolbi McCourtney and Raegan McCourtney all of Mena; three great grandchildren, Cadence Cauthron, Riley and Zoey McCourtney; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

Graveside services will be Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. at the Daniel Cemetery in Wickes with Brother Logan McCourtney officiating. Visitation will be Tuesday, August 7, 2018 from 6-8 P.M. at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena. Funeral Arrangements are entrusted to Bowser Family Funeral Home in Mena.

In lieu of flowers memorials can be made to The Oaks, 1341 Mena Street, Mena, AR 71953.

Online Guestbook: www.bowserffh.com

 

8-6-18 9:51 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Mena Police Department Report For July 29th - August 4th

 
Mena Police Department Reports for week of July 29, 2018 through August 4, 2018
 
July 29, 2018
Mikos Pierce, 18, of Mena was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct following a call to a local residence.
 
Joseph Cunningham, 32, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct and breaking or entering.  The arrest followed a follow-up investigation from information received regarding a vehicle stolen in Montgomery County.
 
July 30, 2018
Kristine Nichole Wootton, 34, of Mena was charged with prostitution and assault after officers investigated information received from multiple individuals concerning activities in which Ms. Wootton was involved.
 
Two 16-year-old Mena youths were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.  The case was referred to juvenile authorities.
 
July 31, 2018
A Mena woman reported the attempted break-in of a storage building on her property.  Case is under investigation.
 
Report was made of a purse being stolen from a local fast food restaurant.  Case is currently being investigated.
 
August 1, 2018
A local man reported that his dog had been attacked and injured by a neighbor’s dog.  Case is being investigated.
 
August 2, 2018
A Mena woman reported that someone had vandalized her vehicle by “keying” it.  No charges have been filed at this time.
 
Nick Kesterson, 19, of Cove was arrested on two outstanding warrants for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
Randi Hall, 23, of Mena was arrested on a body attachment warrant from Polk County.
 
 
August 3, 2018
Daniel P. Schmidt, 53, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass, theft of property, resisting arrest, and fleeing.  The arrest followed a call to a local retail store.
 
Caleb John Chaquica, 36, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance.
 
Ashley Gail Smith, 26, Jim Justin Pearce, 40, both of Mena were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers responded to a call from employees at a local retail store.
 
A former Mena resident reported that someone had gotten a telephone account in her name without her consent.  Case is pending.
 
David Sinyard, 42, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass and introducing prohibited articles.  The arrest followed a call to a local business.
 
Michael Wayne Creel, 31, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.
 
Gerald Todd Davis, 42, of Mena was charged with DWI and refusal to submit to chemical testing.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.
 
Derrick P. Lester, 43, of Mena was arrested on a warrant.
 
August 4, 2018
Report was made of a Mena resident being harassed and threatened by an acquaintance.  Case is pending location and interview of suspect.
 
Report was made of a missing teenage girl.  She was later located and returned to her parents' custody.
 
8-6-18 9:35 a.m. kawx.org 

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2018 Sales Tax Holiday This Weekend

 

Beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday August 4, 2018, and ending at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday August 5, 2018, the State of Arkansas will hold its sales tax holiday allowing shoppers the opportunity to

purchase certain School Supplies, School Art Supplies, School Instructional Materials, and clothing free of state and local sales or use tax.    

 

For more information, click anywhere on this line.

 

8-3-18 8:48 p.m. kawx.org 

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Term Limits Amendment Certified for the November Ballot

Today, Secretary of State Mark Martin certified petition signatures from a citizen’s group for term limits. The measure is slated for the November 2018 General Election ballot as Issue 3.  
 
In a letter last March, I said that the term limits amendment being proposed for the ballot this November would put Arkansas’ term limits law back to the way things were prior to the passage of a law that extended legislative terms in 2014.  I wrote that letter when my understanding of the current proposed term limits amendment was incomplete.  Here is what I have learned about the proposed term limits amendment.
 
This year’s term limits amendment differs from the term limits law that was in place from 1992 to 2014 in the following ways.

 

  1. Similar to the old term limits law, it allows people to serve 6 years in the Arkansas House or 8 years in the Arkansas Senate.  It differs from the old law, because it limits a person’s total years of service in the legislature to no more than 10 years.  This means that a person could serve 6 years in the House and 4 years in the Senate.  They could serve 8 years in the Senate and 2 years in the House.  They could serve any combination that totaled 10 years or less.  
     
  2. The amendment also adds a provision prohibiting the legislature from doing what they did in 2014, which was to propose legislation giving themselves more years in office.  Under the new amendment, the legislature is prohibited from making any changes to the term limits amendment or referring any changes to a vote of the people.  The people would still be able to circulate petitions and place any change or repeal of the amendment on the ballot.

 
In 2014, the Arkansas Legislature proposed a constitutional amendment extending the total number of years they could serve to 16 years, with the possibility of serving all of that time in one house. That same amendment contained ethics provisions designed to prohibit gifts from lobbyists, and it established processes for setting lawmakers' salaries. 
 
The measure was widely criticized because many voters did not understand the nature of the amendment based on its popular name that appeared on the ballot.  It was listed on the ballot as “The Arkansas Elected Officials Ethics, Transparency, and Financial Reform Amendment of 2014.” Many voters did not know that the measure increased the number of terms lawmakers could serve or that it would affect lawmakers' salaries.  The 2014 measure passed with 53% of the vote.  This year’s proposed term limits amendment does not affect lawmaker’s salaries or the provisions regarding gifts to lawmakers. 
 
After proposed ballot measures are certified by the Secretary of State, they can be challenged in court for deficiencies in the ballot title or improper gathering of signatures.  If enough deficiencies are found, the Arkansas Supreme Court could order the measure removed from the ballot or issue an order that votes on the measure not be counted.  So far, no challenges have been filed in court.

 

 

Jerry Cox

Family Council

414 S. Pulaski
Suite 2
Little RockAR 72201
(501) 375-7000
 
8-3-18 8:16 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address - Two Big Events for One Important Topic

 
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – This week, two events in my schedule overlapped in a way that we didn’t plan but presented me the opportunity to emphasize the importance of job skill training centers in Arkansas.
 
On Wednesday, I was in Springdale to announce that the state is allocating one million dollars over two years to the Northwest Technical Institute, a two-year technical school in Springdale. The money is to cover one-third of the cost for Northwest Technical Institute to expand its training program in ammonia refrigeration, industrial maintenance, and boiler operation.
 
Ammonia refrigeration is a high-demand occupation in Northwest Arkansas and across the state, where many companies use large-scale refrigeration systems. NWTI is expanding its program after Tyson executives asked the school for help to address its shortage of certified technicians to handle the work in their plants.
 
Tyson was having to send its employees out of state to train because we did not have the capacity in Arkansas to train enough technicians in the maintenance and repair of ammonia refrigerators.
A shortage of qualified employees isn’t limited to the poultry industry. Leaders in other industries have sought help in finding welders, HVAC technicians, diesel-engine mechanics and other occupations that require certification or a license. Our technical training centers and our high schools across Arkansas are helping to fill that gap.
 
The technical training is an essential opportunity in our education system. College may not be the best option for everyone. At technical centers, high school graduates and even students still in high school can learn a trade. A high school student may be ready to test and go to work as soon as he or she graduates.
 
When I took office, 54 school districts didn’t have a technical training center. When school opens this fall, the number of unserved districts will be down to 17.
 
My trip to NWTI to announce the assistance for ammonia refrigeration had been on the schedule for a long time.
 
The overlapping event I mentioned came as an unexpected invitation from President Trump to join him at the White House on Tuesday. The president was going to sign a bill that allocates money to states to support technical-education programs, such as the ones at NWTI.
 
In the private ceremony, the president signed a bill reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, which increases access to high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE) programs.
 
So two days in a row, in ceremonies in Washington and in Springdale, I had the unplanned privilege of participating in two ceremonies that gave me back-to-back opportunities to deliver the message that technical and job skill training is necessary to build a skilled workforce across our nation.
 
Ammonia refrigeration, by the way, is different than cooling systems that use Freon. Ammonia is more efficient and cools faster, but it is less stable and requires careful handling. Not just any refrigerator expert can work on an ammonia system, which partly explains why the industry has come up short on technicians.
 
But private industry has partnered with the state, and next summer, a class of newly certified technicians will show up to fill the jobs.
 
8-3-18 8:02 p.m. kawx.org

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

Out of every 100,000 Arkansans, 14 will die from a drug overdose. If this trend continues, the drug overdose death rate may surpass the motor vehicle death rate, which was 20 per 100,000 in 2016.

 

In short, drug overdoses are killing us. Nearly 116 Americans die each day from an overdose of a legal opioid prescription pain killer or a lethal dose of illegal heroin.

 

The young age at which many drug overdoses occur increases the burden these deaths place on our communities. Between 2014 and 2016, the average age of a drug overdose decedent was 43 years. During the same time period, the average age at death from all causes was 71, which means that overdoses shortened many people’s lives by close to three decades The issue is complex, baffling, and heart-breaking.

 

In the 2019 Drug Threat Assessment Report from the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), methamphetamine is cited as our state’s most significant drug threat.  The use of pharmaceutical drugs like Oxycontin and Hydrocodone continues to increase posing another significant threat.  And now heroin use is slowly but inexorably increasing.

 

According to the report, the continued growth of heroin appears to be a direct result of the abuse of pharmaceutical drugs, whose abusers transition to the drug due to the price and availability.  Adding to the already increasing concerns of the drugs dangers, law enforcement is finding that half of all heroin confiscated in the state is laced with fentanyl.

 

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid. It is 30-50 times more potent than heroin and 50-100 times more potent than morphine.

 

Arkansas is certainly not alone in this struggle.  In fact, just this week at the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), legislators from around the country shared what their government is doing to combat this growing epidemic.  We will continue to study effective policies in other states to determine what legislation may be needed in 2019.

 

In the last session, we passed Act 284. This allows pharmacists in Arkansas to order, dispense and/or administer naloxone without a prescription. It provides greater access to more Arkansans and first responders in the event of a drug overdose.

 

In 2018 alone, law enforcement agencies have administered naloxone 68 times to overdose patients.

 

There are positive developments when it comes to our state’s battle with drug use.  In the last 5 years, drug abuse rates among our youth has declined every year.  We look forward to seeing this rate decline.

 

If you or a family member is struggling with addiction, we encourage you to visit www.artakeback.org.  This site has valuable information on opioid addiction and links to treatment centers across the state.

 

8-3-18 3:39 p.m. kawx.org 

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Help End Abortion in Arkansas

 

This September pro-life Arkansans will gather for peaceful prayer outside abortion facilities.

 

The prayer vigils are part of the 40 Days for Life campaign.

 

All across the country, Americans will join together praying that abortion will end.

 

40 Days for Life will begin in less than two months on September 26, and it will last until November 4. Volunteers will take turns praying outside abortion facilities from 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM throughout the day.

 

Leaders are looking for churches who will each recruit enough volunteers to cover one or more days during the 40 days. Typically, a volunteer will pray for only one hour outside the abortion facility, so it takes at least 12 volunteers to cover an entire day.

 

These gatherings are not rallies or protests. They are peaceful assemblies for prayer and reflection — and they work.

 

Every year we hear stories from other states of abortion clinics shut down and abortion workers coming to Christ in the wake of a 40 Days for Life prayer campaign. We want Arkansas to be next.

 

This is your opportunity to help us end abortion, and all you have to do is pray.

 

People in central Arkansas can learn more about 40 Days for Life by contacting Toni Blackwell at 501-650-2993 or 40DaysForLifeLittleRock@gmail.com.

 

In Northwest Arkansas, you can learn more about 40 Days for Life by contacting Sheila Pursell at 469-231-1959 or 40DaysNWA@gmail.com.

 

8-3-18 9:41 a.m. kawx.org

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague - "Flashing Red. Kids Ahead."

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 3, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Educators and traffic safety officials have expanded their annual campaign to alert motorists that students are returning to school, so everyone should be more careful driving because children are again getting on and off school buses every day.

 

This is the sixth year of the campaign, called “Flashing Red. Kids Ahead.” In the past it has lasted three weeks, and this year school officials, police departments and civic leaders will promote school bus safety for the entire month of August.

 

It’s little wonder that commuters notice the absence of students in summer and their reappearance in August. In Arkansas 350,000 students ride 7,000 buses every school day.

 

Transportation officials at the state Education Department promote school bus safety all through the year.

 

As part of their continuing efforts to enhance school bus safety, they conducted a survey of 3,200 bus drivers in April. On a single day, they reported 850 instances of a motor vehicle illegally passing a bus that was stopped to pick up or drop off children.

 

In 2005 the legislature strengthened the penalties for passing a stopped school bus that has its red lights flashing to indicate children are getting on or off. The enhanced penalties are in Act 2128 of 2005, which is titled Isaac’s Law in memory of a nine-year-old from Benton who was killed by a passing motorist after he had got off a school bus.

 

Since 2011, after the legislature approved Act 37, it has been illegal to use a cell phone while driving through a school zone. Act 37 also prohibits the use of a cell phone while driving through a construction zone while workers are present.

 

In 2009 Arkansas joined a long list of states that prohibit text messaging while behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. Previous laws had prohibited teenaged drivers from texting, but Act 181 of 2009 prohibits all drivers from texting.

 

That year the State Police worked 787 traffic accidents in which drivers were distracted by cell phones. Federal transportation officials say driver distraction is a factor in 16 percent of fatal crashes.

 

The State Police joined a nationwide safety campaign in April meant to prevent driving while distracted. It was called “"U Drive – U Text – U Pay."

 

In 2016, distracted drivers caused traffic accidents that killed 3,450 people in the United States.

 

Reading and sending text messages are not the only distractions that endanger motorists. Talking on a phone or using it to search the Internet is a distraction. So is eating, drinking or smoking. Talking to other people in your vehicle can create distractions. Adjusting the navigation system, turning on music or changing radio stations are also common distractions.

 

In September, police and traffic safety officials will conduct a child safety campaign, aimed at teaching adults to make sure that children in the car are always properly buckled up in an appropriate booster seat. That will be followed by Teen Driver Safety Week in October.

 

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for American teens aged 15 to 18. The discouraging news is that in 2016, when the most recent statistics were compiled, the number of teen deaths from car crashes went up by six percent over 2015.

 

8-3-18 9:32 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Delivering Resources to Prepare Arkansas's Workforce for 21st Century Jobs

Delivering Resources to Prepare Arkansas’s Workforce for 21st Century Jobs

 

As the summer draws to a close, students and workers alike will experience a renewed focus on the development of workforce-readiness skills with teachers and industry leaders working to create a job-ready and career-bound workforce. Arkansas is eager to continue building a strong foundation to meet the needs of modern businesses. Recent efforts in Congress will help advance this effort even further.  

 

Communities across Arkansas have been ready to welcome new workers to meet the demands of local manufacturers and industry. In recent years, Arkansas has implemented measures to identify the skills necessary to fill these roles. It has become clear that tailored educational programs and occupational skills training are essential to hardworking Arkansans’ ability to thrive. 

 

This is happening in the classroom where traditional coursework like computer science equips students with the skills needed to meet the demands of 21st century employers. Universities, along with vocational and technical schools across Arkansas, are collaborating with local businesses to advance local economic interests and help create innovative curricula to match the needs in the community and region. Initiatives like the Associated Industries of Arkansas Foundation’s Be Pro Be Proud were launched in response to the need for highly-skilled labor for businesses and manufacturers across the state that require specialized training, not a traditional four-year degree.

 

Career and technical education is increasingly important to Arkansas. State officials say it is part of the key to prosperity in the Natural State’s future. A wide range of interests from education to industry have repeatedly requested for Congress to modernize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act to help support students and adults going back to school to gain the education and training they need to find high-skill, high-wage or in-demand jobs. In July, with my support, Congress passed the reauthorization of CTE funding and the president signed it into law.

 

This is the first reauthorization of Perkins CTE in more than a decade. It makes important updates to the law that funds career and technical education programs. We made reforms to limit the role of the federal Department of Education, an important step that will provide states with greater authority to determine the best ways to help their students learn and workers remain competitive. This flexibility strengthens Arkansas’s control over its goals and programs to best prepare and develop its workforce.

 

States and local school districts will have more freedom to spend the limited program dollars they receive to benefit students rather than on complying with expensive and burdensome federal reporting requirements. 

 

Providing resources for workforce education is vital to the economic growth and prosperity of Arkansas. Training students and workers to learn technical skills or a trade will help fill well-paying jobs today and in the future.

 

8-3-18 9:26 a.m. kawx.org 

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Arkansas Highway Police Searching for Officers to Fill Ranks

LITTLE ROCK– Arkansas Highway Police began accepting applications for law enforcement officers and will fill vacancies throughout the State.

 

Arkansas Highway Police (AHP) is a Division of the Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT). AHP is a nationally recognized leader in the fields of drug interdiction, motor carrier safety and hazardous materials enforcement, and training. Officers serve as instructors for the Criminal Justice Institute, National Training Center, Transportation Safety Institute, and the Drug Interdiction Assistance Program.

 

Arkansas Highway Police are responsible for the enforcement of state laws regulating the use of public highways with special emphasis on commercial vehicles and private non-passenger transportation vehicles. Officers maintain expertise in size, weight, hazardous materials, license, tax, traffic and criminal law enforcement, and motor carrier safety.

 

The annual starting salary is $40,300. Officers already certified through the Arkansas Commission on Law Enforcement Standards and Training (ACLEST) begin at $42,328, annually. Benefits of working for AHP include annual and sick leave, group healthcare and life insurance plans, Arkansas State Highway Employees Retirement System, and uniform and special expense allowances.

Applications can be submitted by visiting www.ardot.gov. Select the “Employment” tab and then choose, “All Other Applicants.”

 

ARDOT complies with all civil rights provisions of federal statutes and related authorities that prohibit discrimination in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. Therefore, the Department does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, age, national origin, religion (not applicable as a protected group under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Title VI Program), disability, Limited English Proficiency (LEP), or low-income status in the admission, access to and treatment in the Department's programs and activities, as well as the Department's hiring or employment practices.

 

8-2-18 9:23 a.m. kawx.org

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Preparation can Lower the Cost of Expensive Back-to-School Shopping

LITTLE ROCK – Parents across Arkansas have been gearing up and saving money for back-to-school shopping, but supplies and clothes can be expensive, especially if parents do not take the time to price shop. From school supplies, to new gadgets and clothes, money quickly adds up.
 
“Back-to-school shopping can be stressful and financially straining for Arkansans,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “But taking the time to compare prices, taking advantage of the best deals and only buying the necessities can save a lot of money.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following tips for parents who are back-to-school shopping:

 

  • Stick to the teacher-approved school supply list. Do not waste time and money on unlisted, impulse items that may never be used.
  • Research prices ahead of time. Use price comparison apps or websites to check best available prices in real time. Or shop end-of-summer sales. Also consider that many stores will price-match better deals from other retailers.
  • Check school supply deals at supermarkets and scope out the office supply items before going to the back-to-school section. More items could be in stock for a better price.
  • For larger, more expensive items like sports equipment, electronics or musical instruments, consider buying used or refurbished.
  • Ask about and understand a store’s return policy, and recognize sometimes a box cannot be returned once it is opened.
  • If shopping online, only purchase items on a secure website. Determine whether a website is secure by looking for a “lock” icon in a browser’s status bar and the letters “https” at the start of the website’s URL.
  • Consider paying for online purchases with a credit card. Consumers are allowed under federal law to dispute those charges and cardholders may have no liability if a card is stolen fraudulently and used.

 
Some providers and companies offer student discounts on wireless service, cell phones, tablets and other electronics. Check with the provider to determine available discounts.
 
Arkansas’s sales tax holiday, which suspends state and local tax on certain school supplies and clothing, is Aug. 4 and 5.
 
According to the National Retail Federation, families spent nearly $84 billion in back-to-school and back-to-college spending last year. Meanwhile, they estimate $685 in spending per child in grades K-12.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-2-18 9:07 a.m. kawx.org 

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Weekly Fishing Report

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 1, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Click on the area below that you are interetsed in.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-1-18 3:40 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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Attorney General Rutledge Issues Statement on Planned Parenthood Ruling

Rutledge Issues Statement on Planned Parenthood Ruling

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge released the following the statement after U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker denied Planned Parenthood’s motion for preliminary injunction in Planned Parenthood Arkansas & Eastern Oklahoma v. Gillespie. That decision leaves in place Governor Asa Hutchinson’s decision terminating Medicaid payments to Planned Parenthood.

 

“Yesterday’s ruling from Judge Baker ensures the integrity of our state’s resources by no longer allowing Planned Parenthood to use its patients to pad its bottom line on the backs of Arkansas taxpayers. I’ve strongly and successfully defended Governor Hutchinson’s decision to terminate the state’s Medicaid contract with Planned Parenthood. It’s time for Planned Parenthood to identify other sources and no longer rely on taxpayer money.”

 

7-31-18 4:08 p.m. kawx.org 

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11 Arkansas Playgrounds, Including Acorn Elementary In Polk County, Selected to Participate in Annual Shade Trees on Playgrounds Program

11 Arkansas Playgrounds Selected to Participate in Annual Shade Trees on Playgrounds Program

 

LITTLE ROCK, AR – The Arkansas Agriculture Department’s Forestry Commission (AFC) has selected 11 playgrounds at the following schools to participate in the Shade Trees on Playgrounds program (S.T.O.P.):

 

·         Acorn Elementary School (Polk County)

·         Ascent Children’s Health Services (Independence County)

·         Bradley Elementary School (Lafayette County)

·         Gandy Elementary School (Jefferson County)

·         Harmony Grove Elementary School (Ouachita County)

·         Lonoke Elementary School (Lonoke County)

·         Parkview Elementary School (Crawford County)

·         Springhill Elementary School (Faulkner County)

·         St. John’s Catholic School (Garland County)

·         Viola Elementary School (Baxter County)

·         Weiner Elementary School (Poinsett County)

 

The Shade Trees on Playgrounds Program (S.T.O.P.) was organized to lower adult skin cancer risk by reducing childhood exposure to direct sunlight where children play, like school playgrounds.  Winning schools receive five shade trees, mulch, watering supplies, and planting guidelines after participating in program training.

 

“The S.T.O.P. program combines hands-on, outdoor experiences with classroom curriculum about the importance of trees and the care they require,” says Urban Forestry Partnership Coordinator, Krista Quinn. “We hope this program not only improves the health of Arkansas students, but also leaves a lasting impression about the value of forests and how to be good stewards of our natural resources.”

 

Schools are invited to submit S.T.O.P. applications annually.  To qualify, participating schools must lack shade, agree to use Arkansas Forestry Commission curriculum to emphasize the importance of trees and forestry in Arkansas, hold a tree planting ceremony with students, and agree to long-term maintenance of the planted shade trees.  AFC personnel assist with the transport and planting of the trees.

 

The application period for the 2019 S.T.O.P. program will begin in April, 2019. Learn more about the S.T.O.P. program, here. With program questions, contact Krista Quinn at 479-228-7929 or krista.quinn@agriculture.arkansas.gov.

 

The AAD is dedicated to the development and implementation of policies and programs for Arkansas agriculture and forestry to keep its farmers and ranchers competitive in national and international markets while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of the state and nation.  Visit www.agriculture.arkansas.gov.

 

7-31-18 3:39 p.m. kawx.org

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For July 23 - July 29

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 23, 2018 – July 29, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
July 23, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 42 near Mena of the theft of an ATV, valued at $1,500.00. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Mena of being harassed via social media. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on North 2nd Street in Cove of an unauthorized person on their property. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with Arkansas Probation/Parole was Candi M. Brown, 35, of Mena, on a Parole Hold.
 
July 24, 2018
Report of a suspicious person on Polk 63 near Yocana. Deputies responded. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Ginger R. Aquaah, 37, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear and a Garland County Warrant.
Arrested was Michael D. Poe, 49, of Mena, on a Charge of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
Arrested was Quincy E. Young, 36, of Hot Springs, on a Garland County Warrant.
 
July 25, 2018
Report from complainant on June Lane near Wickes of financial identity fraud, totaling losses at $972.00. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 23 near Cove of the theft of tools, all valued at $890.00. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant of damage done to a vehicle while parked at a local swimming area near Big Fork, totaling losses at $2,500.00. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 North near Mena of the theft of a wallet containing $235.00 in cash and a debit card. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from Mena Regional Health System of a dog bite victim. Deputy responded.
Arrested by an officer with Arkansas Probation Parole was Daniel C. Cox-Matthews, 42, of Texarkana, on a Parole Hold.
Arrested was Justin C. Drager, 25, of Mena, on a Warrant for Unlawful Burning.
 
July 26, 2018
Report from complainant of damage done to a vehicle while parked at Lake Wilhelmina near Rocky. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 80 near Shady of identity fraud, totaling losses at $680.38. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 375 West near Potter of the theft of a package from a mailbox. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Casey L. Graves, 41, of Norman, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Timmy R. Lane, 30, of Norman, on a Body Attachment Warrant.
Arrested was Rosie R. Arthur, 44, of Cove, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
July 27, 2018
Report of a disturbance on Polk 47 near Rocky. Deputy responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on School Street in Cove of being harassed by an unknown individual. Deputy responded. Investigation continues.
Report of an ATV accident on Highway 8 West near Rocky.
Report from an out-of-state complainant of inappropriate behavior involving his 10-year-old daughter while she was in Polk County. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 88 West near Mena of several incidents of vandalism done to equipment. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Zackery W. Benson, 25, of Mena, on Warrants for Criminal Mischief 1st Degree, Residential Burglary, Failure to Comply with a Court Order and two counts of Failure to Appear.
 
July 28, 2018
Report from a Hatfield woman that her 15-year-old son had ran away. Investigation continues.
Traffic stop on Polk 48 near Potter led to the arrest of Brandon L. Ayers, 45, of Potter, on Charges of DWI and Driving Left of Center.
Arrested was Michael D. Rogers, 35, of Mena, on a Body Attachment Warrant.
 
July 29, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 92 near Shady Grove of being threatened by an acquaintance. Deputy responded. Investigation continues.
Traffic stop on Highway 88 West near Mena led to Citations for Driving Left of Center and Expired Driver’s License being issued to Michael L. Thompson, 36, of Hatfield. Additional information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 614 near Mena. Deputy responded. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Roger A. T. Burton, 29, of Mena, on Charges of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License, No Proof of Insurance and No Vehicle License, and Warrants for Theft of Property and six counts of Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked three vehicle accidents this week. Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 28 Incarcerated Inmates, with 6 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00500
 
7-30-18 4:09 p.m. kawx.org 

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PUBLIC NOTICE To All Residents and Occupants of the City of Mena-Sanitary Sewer Smoke Testing Scheduled

PUBLIC NOTICE To All Residents and Occupants of the City of Mena-Sanitary Sewer Smoke Testing Scheduled 

 

The Mena Water Utilities will be conducting smoke testing of the sanitary sewer system in upcoming months. This testing will begin the week of August 6th and is expected to be completed by October 26th . This study will involve the opening and entering of manholes in the streets and public utility easements. An important task of the testing will be to locate breaks and defects in the sewer system. The smoke will also reveal sources of where storm and other surface water enter the sewer system. A special non-toxic smoke will be used in these tests. The smoke is manufactured for this purpose, leaves no residuals or stains, and has no effect on plant or animal life. The smoke has a distinctive, but not unpleasant, odor. Visibility and odor last only a few minutes, where there is adequate ventilation. Because the plumbing appliances in your house or building are connected to the sanitary sewer system, some smoke may enter your home or place of business if the:

 

Vents connected to your building's sewer pipes are inadequate, defective, or improperly installed.

 

Traps under sinks, tubs, basins, showers and other drains are dry, defective, improperly installed, or missing.

 

Pipes, connections and seals of the wastewater drain system in and under your buildings are damaged, defective, have plugs missing, or are improperly installed.

 

Homeowners are advised to run water in drains that are not frequently used to avoid a dry trap. If traces of this smoke or its odor enter your house or building, it is an indication that gases and odors from the sewer also may enter. These can be both unpleasant and dangerous, as well as a health risk to the occupants. Should smoke enter your home or business, you may contact Mena Water Utilities to report the problem.

 

Your cooperation will be appreciated. The information gained from this testing will be used to improve your sewer services and may reduce the eventual cost to utility customers.

 

Should you have any questions on this matter, please contact Mena Water Utilities at 479-394-2761.

7-30-18 10:31 a.m. kawx.org 

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Rutledge First Arkansas Constitutional Officer to Have Given Birth While Holding Office Says, 'daughter is an absolute blessing and gift from God'

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge and husband, Boyce Johnson, today announced the birth of their daughter, Julianna Carol Johnson. She was born July 27, 2018, weighing 5 pounds 15 ounces and 18.9 inches long. Julianna is the first child for the couple. The family is recovering well at home and is grateful for the outpouring of support.

 

“Boyce and I are bursting with joy over our new addition to the family,” said Attorney General Rutledge. “The birth of our daughter is an absolute blessing and gift from God. Thank you to our family, friends, and all Arkansans for the outpouring of well wishes and prayers throughout my pregnancy. We appreciate Dr. Nancy Collins and all of the nurses and staff at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences for their love, support and professionalism.”

                                                                                                                     

Julianna Carol is named for her paternal grandmother’s middle name, Ann, and maternal grandmother’s and mother’s middle name, Carol.

 

Rutledge announced her pregnancy in April. In addition to being the first constitutional officer of Arkansas to give birth while holding office, Rutledge is also the first female and first Republican elected to the Office of Attorney General in Arkansas.

 

7-30-18 10:15 a.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Police Department Report for July 22nd through July 28th

Mena Police Department Reports for week of July 22, 2018 through July 28, 2018 follows:
 
 
July 22, 2018
 
Krystal Neer, 32, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding failure to appear warrant from the Mena Police Department.
 
A Mena woman reported that her purse had been stolen from a local restaurant.  Case is pending review of surveillance tapes and location and interview of any suspects.
 
Anthony Michael Wagner, 22, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after officers called to a local motel.
 
July 23, 2018
 
Bambe Mellard, 34, of Mena was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia.  The arrest followed a traffic stop and subsequent investigation.
 
Bryan Garrett Beam, 27, of Mena was charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers were called to a local retail store.
 
July 24, 2018
 
Veronica Mae Maddox, 21, of Cove was arrested on three outstanding warrants from the Mena Police Department and the Polk County Sheriff’s office.
 
Report was taken of a counterfeit $20.00 bill being passed at a local fast food restaurant.  Case is pending.
 
July 25, 2018
 
Lester P. Derrick, 43, of Mena was charged with DWI, second offense, driving on a suspended driver’s license,  fleeing in a vehicle, disregarding a traffic signs, and resisting arrest.
 
Report was taken of a local man violating a no-contact order.  Case has been sent to the prosecuting attorney for review.
 
Shannon King, 23, of Mena was charged with third degree battery, breathing or inhaling intoxicants, disorderly conduct and criminal mischief.  The arrest followed a call to a local residence.
 
 
July 26, 2018
 
Patrick Mallman, 18, of Mena was charged with theft of property.  The arrest followed a call to a local business.
 
July 27, 2018
 
Dennis Stinson, 40, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from Polk County.
 
A local woman reported that her boyfriend had damaged the windshield of her car.  Case is pending.
 
Adam Britt Bailey, 31, of Mena was arrested on a warrant for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
July 28, 2018
 
Report was taken of a local man violating an order of protection filed by his wife.  Case pending.
 
7-30-18 10:10 a.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson Weekly Radio Address: A New State Crime Lab in Northwest Arkansas

To listen to the Governor's radio address, click anywhere on this line, then press the play button, or you can read the text below.

 

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas State Crime Lab serves a vital role in law enforcement and criminal justice.

The lab provides services like toxicology, drug analysis, fingerprint identification, forensic pathology, and DNA analysis to state law enforcement agencies. Currently, the state crime lab in Little Rock handles almost all of the cases in Arkansas. The crime lab’s satellite facility in Hope helps to manage the caseload by handling drug analysis cases in South Arkansas. But nearly 40 percent of the drug and toxicology cases that the state crime lab processes are from the northwest part of the state.

This week, I had the pleasure of announcing that we will open a new crime lab in Lowell to increase the state’s ability to process and analyze data. And the good news is that the Arkansas State Police has made space available so we won’t need to construct a new building. I have designated state funds to build out and equip this facility, and I look forward to seeing it open in about seven months.

All over the nation, the caseload for crime labs is increasing. Statistics over the past five years indicate that the toxicology caseload is steadily increasing as well. The Little Rock laboratory does not have the physical infrastructure required to sustain this growth.

With a growing population in Northwest Arkansas, it makes sense to expand in this area. And although nearly 40 percent of the state’s drug and toxicology cases are from Northwest Arkansas, the Northwest Arkansas law enforcement agencies have been traveling to Little Rock to deliver and pick up evidence. In 2015, Northwest Arkansas law enforcement agencies submitted evidence to the crime lab in Little Rock 972 times.

Because of the distance, most law enforcement agencies travel to the Little Rock laboratory only once a month— creating bottlenecks for our court system and causing issues that often prevent speedy trials. 

With a facility in Lowell, we can process more cases in less time, resulting in a more prompt judicial response.

But this new crime lab won’t just benefit Northwest Arkansas; the new crime lab will benefit the entire state. Not only will the lab alleviate the backlog of drug and toxicology cases in the region, but it will also allow the Little Rock crime lab more time to focus on homicide cases, providing closure to families and loved ones in a more timely manner.

My hope for this crime lab is that it will ultimately allow the state to provide better services for our courts, our law enforcement, and our citizens. The opening of this new lab is another example of how I am working to transform state government to be more efficient and to provide better service.

 

7-27-18 8:20 p.m. kawx.org

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Of all the gifts you'll give your child, few will be more important than a college education. But affording that education requires many families to make a plan.

 

On average, college tuition triples every 17 years. Is it worth it? Absolutely. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, college graduates will earn an average of $1 million more over their lifetime than a high school grad.

 

This week, we want to tell you about a new app to make saving for college even easier.

 

The office of the Arkansas Treasurer of the State recently announced the launch of the new Arkansas 529 GIFT Plan app.  This is the first state-run 529 plan in the country to launch a smartphone app.

The new Arkansas 529 GIFT Plan smartphone app allows account owners to:

 

  • View account balances
  • View transaction history
  • Get deposit and security alerts
  • Stay up to date on news concerning their plans.

 

The app will also help the Arkansas 529 GIFT Plan share pertinent information with account owners. 

 

529 plans were established to help parents and grandparents save money for college that can be used at schools across the country and some institutions abroad. (The name "529" refers to the Internal Revenue Code section that discusses this type of college savings tool.)

 

Arkansas taxpayers can deduct up to $5,000 (up to $10,000 for married couples) of their Arkansas 529 GIFT Plan contributions from their Arkansas adjusted gross income. If you are a resident of Arkansas, your earnings are state-tax free if withdrawn to pay for qualified higher education expenses.

 

Saving even a little can be more cost effective than borrowing. While most families combine some level of saving and borrowing when paying for college, putting aside money early and often is a good way for you to build your savings. Saving and investing even a little each month can be more financially prudent than borrowing money and paying interest on it.

 

The Arkansas 529 app is available for free download in the App Store and Google Play. You can learn more about starting an Arkansas 529 investing plan at www.arkansas529.org.

 

7-27-18 5:25 p.m. kawx.org 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column-Leveling the Economic Playing Field for Women Worldwide

Leveling the Economic Playing Field for Women Worldwide

 

Women make up the majority of the world’s poor. They are often held back by gender-specific constraints to economic empowerment, such as lack of access to financial services and credit. In many corners of the world, these barriers make it difficult for women to start businesses, build savings and make meaningful economic contributions to their communities.

 

I am coordinating a bipartisan effort in the Senate to change this dynamic. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) and I have introduced legislation that aims to eliminate global gender-related barriers and empower female entrepreneurs around the world.

 

The Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment (WEEE) Act is a strong bill that aims to help over one billion women who are left out of the formal financial system and to close the nearly $300 billion credit gap that exists for women-owned small and medium-sized businesses. A companion to the Boozman-Cardin bill has already passed the U.S. House of Representatives by voice vote.

 

The key to our bill is that it taps into the proven abilities of existing United States Agency for International Development (USAID) programs. The WEEE Act would require USAID to ensure that all strategies and projects of the agency are shaped by a gender analysis and that gender equality and female empowerment are integrated throughout its programs.

 

Additionally, it expands USAID’s microenterprise development assistance authority to include small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), with an emphasis on supporting SMEs owned, managed and controlled by women. The Boozman-Cardin bill also modernizes USAID’s development assistance toolkit to include innovative credit scoring models, financial technology, financial literacy, insurance and actions to improve property and inheritance rights.

 

USAID, especially under the leadership of Administrator Mark Green, does an exceptional job of stretching a finite amount of resources into meaningful results in some of the world’s most impoverished nations. I have complete confidence that should our bill become law, Administrator Green and his team would turn our ideas into successful programs that will help advance economies around the globe. 

 

Everyone benefits from this approach. As Senator Cardin—a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee—noted when we introduced the bill, “investment in women creates a positive cycle of change that can lift women, families, communities and entire countries out of poverty, and this legislation will help us make inroads toward that important goal.”

 

Our colleagues who joined Senator Cardin and I in this effort agree. WEEE Act cosponsors touted the larger impact that eliminating gender-related barriers will have on developing economies. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) called a reduction of the impediments women face “critical for economic growth” and Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) said “empowering women around the globe is the key to unlocking the economic and social potential that so many nations strive to reach.”

 

I couldn’t agree more. The goal of this bill reflects U.S. values and promotes real economic opportunities around the globe. It will change lives, as well as communities on the larger scale.

 

In some parts of the world, women are pushed so far to the sidelines that they are denied access to even the most basic of financial services, much less business loans. Leveling the playing field is the right thing to do and the world economy stands to grow substantially if we can achieve that goal.

 

7-27-18 3:28 p.m. kawx.org 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

July 27, 2018  

 

LITTLE ROCK – All 75 counties in the state and 375 Arkansas cities and towns have signed on to a lawsuit against drug manufacturers and distributors of opioids.

 

The historic partnership between cities and counties is an indicator of the severity of the opioid epidemic in Arkansas.

 

City officials heard an update on the opioid crisis during the 84th Convention of the Arkansas Municipal League, held recently at Little Rock.

 

The state Drug Director told convention delegates that the volume of opioids being distributed in Arkansas makes enforcement and treatment extremely difficult.

 

He said that there are108 prescriptions for every 100 people in the state. A couple of years ago the ratio was 114 prescriptions per 100 people, and the proportion has been more than 100 prescriptions per 100 people since 2007.

 

Another way of measuring the availability of the highly addictive drug in Arkansas is that more than 235 million pills were prescribed in a single year, in a state with a population of about three million people.

 

Opioids are painkillers such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, codeine, fentanyl and other prescription drugs.

 

Also during the convention, Municipal League delegates adopted more than 30 resolutions. One supports state legislation for the assessment and collection of local sales taxes on Internet sales.

 

A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling, in a case titled South Dakota v. Wayfair, clears several obstacles that prevented local jurisdictions from collecting the sales tax on purchases made online.

 

The ruling was a victory for “bricks and mortar” retail stores that have been losing market share over the past decade, as Internet sales grow in popularity. Local business groups argued that they are at a competitive disadvantage because they collect sales taxes, which means their products will cost more than the same product sold online.

 

Last year Amazon, the giant online retailer, announced that it would voluntarily collect sales taxes.

 

The delegates adopted a resolution in support of legislation that would classify Internet providers as utilities.

 

Another resolution by Municipal League delegates supports legislation that would allow cities and towns to use electronic devices to enforce traffic laws.

 

Also, the Municipal League delegates endorsed a package of resolutions urging changes to the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act. One change they endorse is to address the problems that arise when a city official receives a request for records that are so voluminous that responding to the request disrupts basic city services and operations.

 

Another change endorsed by the Municipal League would amend the state Child Maltreatment Act so to protect the records of juveniles. Also, the Municipal League will work to strengthen protections of the identities of confidential informers.

 

The Municipal League was formed in 1934, with the support of mayors and local chambers of commerce, to represent the interests of cities and towns before higher levels of government.

 

The Municipal League has successfully pushed for passage of laws to provide local governments with tort immunity from lawsuits, to allow cities to pass local option sales taxes for paying off bonds, and to establish procedures for annexing suburban lands.

 

7-27-18  11:58 a.m.  kawx.org

 

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Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) On The Increase, Deer Hunting Regulations Change To Address Problem

LITTLE ROCK - Arkansas deer hunters will have more ability to help slow the spread of chronic wasting disease this year, thanks to new regulations passed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

 

In response to new positive cases of CWD detected during last deer season’s sampling efforts, five counties have been added to the CWD management zone. The addition of Benton, Crawford, Franklin, Sebastian and Washington counties extends the outer boundary of the zone west to the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line.

Not all of the zone should be treated the same, however.

 

“The highest concentration of the disease appears to be in Boone, Carroll, Madison and Newton counties,” said Cory Gray, Chief of the AGFC’s Research, Evaluation and Compliance Division. “So we’ve established a two-tiered system to prevent movement outside of those counties as well as movement from the entire CWD zone.”

Hunters may not transport whole deer or elk carcasses from animals taken in Tier 1 of the CWD Management Zone (Boone, Carroll, Madison and Newton counties) to any county outside of that four-county tier. Materials like deboned meat, teeth, cleaned skull plates, tanned hides and taxidermy products can still be moved.

 

The remainder of the CWD Management Zone (Benton, Crawford, Franklin, Johnson, Logan, Marion, Pope, Sebastian, Searcy, Van Buren, Washington and Yell counties) is considered Tier 2 of the zone. Intact carcasses from deer and elk harvested in these counties may not leave the outer boundary of the CWD zone but may travel to the four counties comprising Tier 1. Low-risk materials, including deboned meat, teeth, cleaned skull plates, tanned hides and taxidermy products, can still be moved out of the CWD Management Zone to other parts of the state. 

 

The reason for the two-tiered management approach is to help keep the area with the highest rate of CWD contained as much as possible. By preventing intact carcasses from moving outside of the highest risk area, biologists hope to slow the disease’s spread as much as possible in those areas where only one or two cases have been documented. Managing the spread and prevalence of the disease to these areas helps reduce the likelihood of the disease spreading outside of the CWD Management Zone. 

 

“Our goals are still the same for the CWD Management Zone: maintain efforts to flat-line or decrease the percent of animals infected and minimize all possibilities of the disease spreading,” Gray said. “The more sampling we conduct, the clearer the picture becomes of where the disease is located and at what percentage of infection.”

Antler size has been a standard of success for many hunters over the years, with the motto bigger is always better. That may have been true during the years of quality deer management, but managing to slow the spread of CWD must take a different approach. Male deer have a higher prevalence of CWD than females and young bucks tend to move long distances to establish new home ranges. Therefore, protecting males from harvest can increase the spread of CWD. Antler-point restrictions have been removed within the CWD Management Zone, enabling hunters to harvest smaller bucks to help manage the spread.

 

“Our sampling has shown a higher prevalence rate of CWD in males versus females,” Gray said. “This is common with CWD, and to help stabilize CWD prevalence in the herd for the long term we need to devote more focus on harvest of the buck segment.”

 

“We realize this management strategy is a difficult trade-off for hunters who have seen the benefits of quality deer management, but we feel this is a necessary step in continuing a healthy, stable deer population for the future,” Gray said.

 

Other regulations targeted at reducing transmission of the disease that apply only within the CWD management zone include a ban on feeding wildlife and additional deer tags being made available to landowners within the zone who need to reduce deer density on their property.

 

Feeding wildlife through artificial means has the potential to increase the risk of disease transmission, as it unnaturally concentrates animals within close spaces to each other. CWD is spread through direct and indirect contact between infected deer and materials, so reducing the amount of direct exposure to these vectors can help slow transmission of the disease within a deer herd.

 

“We understand that people still want to bait deer for hunting, and there are exceptions for that,” Gray said. “Baiting strictly for hunting purposes is allowed in the CWD zone from September 1-December 31.  We do ask hunters to consider baiting as a tool to assist in removing additional deer, but to be wise on how they place the bait. We encourage placing a limited amount of bait through spin-style or trough-style feeders and never place bait or mineral licks directly on the ground.”

Gray says food plots are always preferred over baiting whenever possible, as they offer better food quality, don’t feed other animals such as nest predators, and lessen the chance of direct contact.

 

“We ask hunters to continue deer hunting, but understand what is known concerning CWD. Deer hunting will continue in northwest Arkansas, deer are not going extinct, but we are asking hunters to modify some of their hunting practices,” Gray said.

 

7-26-18 1:55 p.m. kawx.org 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Fake Military Charities Steal from Arkansans

LITTLE ROCK – Scammers have been stealing money from Arkansans by posing as veteran charities and requesting charitable donations. These scams result in money paid to the pockets of scammers rather than the veterans charities that rely on them. Last week, Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge announced a new donor education campaign partnership with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and all 50 states. Operation Donate with Honor was launched to help consumers recognize charitable solicitation fraud and identify legitimate charities. In addition to the new campaign, the Arkansas Attorney General’s Office also offers advice to distinguish between fake and real charities.
 
“Con artists are savvy and may use names similar to already existing, trustworthy charities,” said Attorney General Rutledge. “If Arkansans know the correct questions to ask, a scam can usually be spotted. This new partnership is one more way to get the word out and ensure that Arkansans’ hard-earned money is actually helping veterans and our brave service men and women.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following tips to help consumers ensure an organization’s legitimacy before giving money:

 

  • Ask questions before giving. Only give when comfortable that the donation will support a trustworthy organization or activity. Refuse high-pressure appeals. Legitimate charities will not rush a donation.
  • Ask for written information or research the organization online. A legitimate charity will send information that provides the organization’s mission and how the donation will be used, along with proof that the contribution is tax deductible.
  • Call the charity directly. To avoid falling victim to sham solicitors, personally contact the charity before giving a donation by email, to the person knocking at the front door or to a telephone solicitor to ensure it is not a scam.
  • Do not send cash. For security and tax records, make donations by check or credit card.
  • Search the Arkansas Charities Database for more information on charities in Arkansas, including those benefiting service members and their families. 
  •  

Rutledge and the FTC have released a video to highlight tips on how to research charities on giving wisely to veterans organizations.
 
In 2015, Rutledge launched the first-ever Military and Veterans Initiative at the Attorney General’s office to assist active duty military service members, reservists, veterans and their families with consumer-related issues and many other collaborative efforts.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

7-25-18 1:44 p.m. kawx.org 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for July 25, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Click on the area below you are interested in.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

7-25-18 1:38 p.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Treasurer Tanya Fretz Releases Sales And Road Improvement Tax Information for July 2018

Polk County Treasurer Tonya K. Fretz released the Sales Tax General and Road Improvement Sales Tax report for July, along with year-to-date figures today. Both taxes are 1%. Other sales taxes collected are state and city.

 

The July 2018 amount for the two county taxes was $131,047.28. Year-to-date the amount for each is $888,107.40.

 

The July 2018 amount is an increase of $4,238.95 over 2017. The year-to-date total for 2018 is an increase of $52,585.32 over the same period in 2017.

 

7-24-18 2:55 p.m. kawx.org 

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Tomato Canning Class To be held Thursday, July 26th

Whether you have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year or want to buy some at the farmer's market and can for use later, like a good, hot soup this winter, you'll benefit from and enjoy a Tomato Canning Class to be held this Thursday, July 26th from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the Polk County Extension Service office, 211 De Queen Street in Mena.

 

The cost to participate in the class is only $15.00 which includes tomatoes, salt, lemmon juice and instruction.

 

You'll need to bring new jars and lids, water bath canner, and any supplies you think you'll need like pot holders and hot pads. 

 

Deadline to register is 9:00 a.m. the day of the class. To register, or for more details, call the Polk County Extention Office at (479) 394-6018. Class size is limited, so call soon to insure your space. 

 

7-24-18 7:48 a.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Sheriff's Report for July 16th thru July 22nd

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 16, 2018 – July 22, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
July 16, 2018
Report from a Mena man of the fraudulent use of a credit card by an acquaintance. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainants on Polk 14 and Polk 16 near Hatton of damage done to several mailboxes. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Highway 370 near Board Camp of an unauthorized person in their residence led to a 14-year-old female being issued Juvenile Citations for Residential Burglary and Theft of Property. The juvenile was released to the custody of a parent/guardian.
 
Arrested was Stephen H. Hobbs, 31, of Mena, on three Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
July 17, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 48 near Potter of an unauthorized person on their property. Investigation continues.
 
Report of a disturbance on Harris Road near Hatfield. Deputies responded. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Polk 252 near Grannis of the theft of $2,681.69 from a bank account. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Arrested was Jeff N. Robinson, 48, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
July 18, 2018
Report from Mena Regional Health System of an assault victim led to the arrest of Zackery A. Pelz, 27, of Mena, on Charges of Domestic Battery 2nd Degree, Resisting Arrest and Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle.
 
Arrested was Clara D. Ferguson, 43, of Mena, on two Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Arrested was Donathan L. Herron, 21, of Oden, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
July 19, 2018
Report from complainant on Rodgers Drive in Cove of being threatened by an acquaintance. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Report from complainant on Polk 68 near Cherry Hill of an individual that refuses to return a welder and helmet, truck, tractor and trailer. The tractor and trailer were recovered. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
July 20, 2018
Report of a disturbance on Polk 176 near Mena. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
July 21, 2018
Report of a disturbance on Polk 18 near Vandervoort led to the arrest of Katie Flood, 19, of Dequeen, on Charges of Disorderly Conduct and Assault 3rd Degree. Additional information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
July 22, 2018
Traffic stop on Polk 16 near Hatton led to the arrest of Devin N. Smith, 20, of Cove, on Charges of DWI and Careless/Prohibited Driving.
 
Traffic stop on Highway 375 West near Mena led to the arrest of Christopher N. Robertson, 24, of Mena, on Charges of DWI and Careless/Prohibited Driving.
 
A Citation for Public Intoxication was issued to James H. Martin of Mena.
 
Report of a one-vehicle accident on Highway 8 East near Big Fork. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Arrested was Joshua D. Lacefield, 27, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked two vehicle accidents this week.
 
Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 21 Incarcerated Inmates, with 5 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00475
 
7-24-18 7:21 a.m. kawx.org 
 

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Mena Police Department Report for week of July 15, 2018 through July 21, 2018

 
Mena Police Department Reports for week of July 15, 2018 through July 21, 2018 
 
July 15, 2018
 
Douglas L. Carney, 50 was arrested on three outstanding warrants from Polk County.
 
Charles Louis Grahn, 49, of Mena was arrested on three warrants from Polk County Sheriff and one from the Mena city police department.
 
Aldeen Quillan, 47, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from Polk County.
 
Brayden Conner Smith, 18, of DeQueen was charged with DWI and driving left of center after a call from a local resident.  Also charged in the incident with possession of liquor by a miner were Robert Wallace, 18, of Cove and Monty Lloyd, 18, of Wickes.
 
July 16, 2018
 
Liberty Poche, 39, of Mena Caitlyn Duncan, 19, both of Mena, were charged with forgery after they attempted to pass counterfeit cash at a local retail store.
 
Tamari Puckett, 29, of Mena was charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after a call to a local retail store.  She was later charged with possession of drug paraphernalia.
 
July 17 & 18, 2018
 
A local man reported the theft of a bicycle from his porch at a local residence. It was later reported that he located the bicycle in his backyard.
 
Report was taken of a dispute between a woman and her daughter.  Case was referred to juvenile authorities.
 
Report was made of an argument between a local couple.  Case is pending interview of all suspects and witnesses and further investigation.
 
July 19 & 20, 2018
 
Daniel Joseph Arceneaux, 24, of Mena was charged with public intoxication, resisting arrest, and second degree battery.  The arrest followed a call regarding a noise complaint.
 
Brian Dickinson, 36, was charged with obstructing governmental operations, resisting arrest, and possession of a controlled substance.  The arrest followed a routine traffic stop.
 
Report was made of someone stealing a bicycle from the yard of a local residence.  After investigation, the bicycle was located and the victim declined to press charges.
 
July 21, 2018
 
John Fagan, 50, of Mena was arrested on a warrant from Mena Police.
 
Althia Viola Shiflett, 43, of Cove was arrested on an outstanding warrant. 
 
David Leon Vaught, 37, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after officers were called to a local retail store.  He was also served an outstanding warrant for contempt of court for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
A local woman reported that she had been assaulted and harassed by her boyfriend.  Case is pending location and interview of suspect.
 
7-23-18 9:14 a.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Bearcats Football Schedule Announced

 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address - Arkansas's Investment in Financial Technology Pays Off

 
LITTLE ROCK – The Venture Center located in Little Rock held its Demo Day this week, which is graduation day for the founders of the ten startup companies who had just finished twelve weeks of intensive work with mentors from the world of financial technology. The Venture Center focuses solely on financial technology, or fintech, as the industry is known.
 
Demo Day was the entrepreneurs’ opportunity to pitch their companies to the leaders of national financial companies in the hopes of finding an investor. 
 
The Venture Center was founded in 2013 to help dreamers with solid business plans accelerate the development of their business. FIS, a national financial company with a campus in west Little Rock, has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars in its partnership with the Venture Center. FIS also lends the best minds in the company to mentor the startups. 
 
Arkansas also is a partner. Since 2016, my administration has shared in the cost of the FinTech Accelerator program at The Venture Center. On Friday, we announced we will continue the partnership with the Venture Center, and FIS, for 2019.
 
The return on our investment will be new technology jobs in Arkansas.
 
The notion that high-tech opportunities will help us retain our homegrown talent is a fact, not wishful thinking. Arkansas already has produced many high-tech companies that have provided satisfying careers for Arkansans who easily could have worked anywhere in the world.
 
The Venture Center champions a couple of concepts that bear some explaining. When the leaders at The Venture Center select startups for its accelerator mentoring program, they look for businesses that will be “disruptive,” a word that has become a watchword in the technology industry.
 
In fintech, a disruptive firm is one that dramatically changes the way people and companies are accustomed to handling their money. While the term fintech isn’t a household word, it has become an industry that has changed the way we run our households and businesses. In many cases, we aren’t even aware that financial technology has changed our life.  The Automated Teller Machine, for instance, is one of the early fintech devices that disrupted our lives by changing the way we interact with banks.
 
Arkansas has been blessed with many high-tech minds who have disrupted our lives for the better. With The Venture Center and its partners opening doors for the next generation in finance technology, Arkansas will be disrupting the status quo for many years to come. 
 
7-20-18 5:53 p.m. kawx.org 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

The impact that teachers have on students is far-reaching and life-changing. If you have ever considered making a difference in the lives of Arkansas children, now is a perfect time.

 

The Education Committee recently reviewed a report on teacher shortages in our state. The Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) now says there is a critical shortage in 15 areas of study.  These include Art, Chemistry, Computer Science, English/Language Arts, and Math.

 

There is also a concern with the number of Arkansans enrolled in teacher preparation programs. The number of students studying to be a teacher has dropped from 6,161 in 2013 to 3,563 in 2018.  That is a 42% decline.

 

And keeping good teachers has also been a challenge.  Since 2009, an average of 10% of new teachers did not return to the classroom after their first year of teaching.  An average of 31% did not return after 5 years.

 

The Education Committee is taking all of this information into consideration as it develops recommendations for the next session. 

 

In the meantime, ADE has implemented several initiatives aimed at recruiting more teachers. 

 

There are currently 60,317 people in Arkansas with an active teaching licenses.  However, during the last school year only 33,228 were employed as teachers.  In an effort to bring more licensed teachers back to the profession, the number of required professional development hours have been reduced to 36 hours. Free online professional development is available through the ArkansasIDEAS portal at http://ideas.aetn.org.

 

There are 58 schools in the state partnering with colleges and universities to recruit more young people to the profession through a program called Teacher Cadets.  Arkansas Teacher Cadets targets students with exemplary interpersonal and leadership skills.  It features a curriculum based, hands-on approach which educates students how to become a successful teacher and enables them to put their knowledge to work through a classroom internship.

 

There are also several financial aid incentives including loan forgiveness and tuition reimbursement for prospective teachers.  Visit arkansased.gov to learn more.

 

7-20-18 5:09 p.m. kawx.org 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Preserving a Piece of Arkansas History

Preserving a Piece of Arkansas History

 

Modern technology affords us the opportunity to communicate with people from all over the world at the touch of a button, but for most of our nation’s history, mail has been the heart and soul of communication. The American entrepreneurial spirit created methods to improve and accelerate the delivery of mail which became more critical as the country expanded westward.

 

It’s important to remember that the early postal routes to the west crossed through Arkansas. These historic trails help tell the story of the development of the Natural State and the settlement of our country.

 

U.S. Mail contracted the Butterfield Overland Mail Company to transport mail and passengers between St. Louis and Memphis to San Francisco on the Butterfield Overland Trail, which was more commonly referred to as the “Ox-Bow Route” due to its curved path that ran approximately 3,553 miles. It was the first overland transcontinental route by stagecoach.

 

The stagecoaches traveled through much of Arkansas, making stops in St. Francis, Prairie, Lonoke, Faulkner, Conway, Pope, Yell, Logan and Franklin counties. The northwestern route included stops in Benton, Washington and Crawford counties. The routes merged in Fort Smith before continuing all the way to the Pacific coast.

 

From 1858 through 1861, the Butterfield Overland Trail served as the connector between the East and West, providing reliable mail service, transportation of goods and a route for settlers to the western frontier. Its significance is evident today. Four segments of the trail in Arkansas have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places in addition to the Potts Inn in Pottsville and the Fitzgerald Station barn in Springdale–two of the original buildings along the trail that are still standing.

 

We are blessed to have a state filled with many areas of historical significance. This piece of our national history is also a tool for educating future generations and an opportunity to attract tourists interested in learning more about the settlement and growth of our country. Preserving these pieces of history is important to our future. We are on our way to recognizing the Butterfield Overland Trail as a national historic trail. 

 

The National Park Service (NPS) recently approved the Butterfield Overland Trail’s designation as a national historic trail. This is the result of more than a decade-long effort. In 2007, as a member of the House of Representatives, I introduced the Butterfield Overland Trail Study Act to study the historical Ox-Bow Route for potential addition to the National Trails System. This was passed by Congress and signed into law in 2009. The NPS thoroughly analyzed its historical relevance and incorporated public meetings along the proposed route including in Fort Smith and Fayetteville.

 

This puts us one step closer to recognizing the Butterfield Overland Trail for what it is, a national historic trail. Now it’s up to Congress to approve the designation. I will be working with my colleagues to ensure this path that our ancestors took to expand our country is appropriately preserved for future generations to visit and learn about, because it will help them gain a better appreciation for and understanding our state’s history and its role in our nation’s development.

 

7-20-18 11:26 a.m. kawx.org 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

July 20, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas will hold its annual sales tax holiday on Saturday, August 4, and Sunday, August 5.

 

Clothing and footwear that cost less than $100 per item will qualify for the exemption. However, if you buy an item that costs more than $100 you must pay the state and local sales taxes on the entire amount.

 

Accessories costing less than $50 qualify for the exemption.  Examples include wallets, watches, jewelry, sunglasses, handbags, cosmetics, briefcases, hair notions, wigs and hair pieces.

 

Here’s an example provided by the Department of Finance and Administration: a person buys two shirts for $50 each, a pair of jeans for $75 and a pair of shoes for $125.  The sales tax will only be collected on the shoes.  Even though the total price of the shirts and the jeans added up to $175, no sales tax will be collected on them because each individual item cost less than $100.

 

School supplies also qualify, including binders, book bags, calculators, tape, paper, pencils, scissors, notebooks, folders and glue.

 

Textbooks, reference books, maps, globes and workbooks will be exempt from sales taxes.  Also exempt from the sales tax will be art supplies needed for art class, such as clay and glazes, paint, brushes and drawing pads.

 

Bathing suits and beach wear will be exempt as long as they cost less than $100 per item. Diapers and disposable diapers will not be taxed.  Boots, including steel-toed boots, slippers, sneakers and sandals will be exempt from the sales tax as well.

 

Not exempt from the sales tax are sporting goods, such as cleats and spikes worn by baseball, soccer and football players.  Recreational items such as skates, shoulder pads, shin guards and ski boots will be taxed. 

 

Computers, software and computer equipment are not exempt and you will have to pay sales taxes if you purchase those items on the holiday.

 

Act 757 provides that the sales tax holiday will be the first weekend of August every year.  All retail stores are required to participate and may not legally collect any state or local sales taxes on qualified items during the tax holiday.

 

The legislature created the sales tax holiday by approving Act 757 of 2011.  One of the goals of the act is to help families with children in school, which is why it is commonly known as the “Back to School” sales tax holiday. 

 

However, everyone benefits from the holiday, whether or not they have children in school.

 

Veterans Nursing Home

 

The Arkansas State Veterans Home at North Little Rock, which opened last year, has 96 beds and about 70 are occupied.

 

At a recent meeting of the Arkansas Veterans Commission, officials discussed the need to fill the remaining beds so that the nursing home’s budget is not under strain.

 

The facility is a residential setting that consists of eight individual homes that each house 12 veterans. Each veteran has a private room and bathroom.

 

The architectural design at North Little Rock is rare for a long term care facility. Only one percent of nursing homes in the country are similarly designed. It is meant to differ from conventional designs that are more institutional, so that residents are encouraged to socialize.

 

7-20-18 10:53 a.m. kawx.org 

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Arkansas Fishing Report

July 18, 2018

Jim Harris

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for July 18, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Click on the area you are interested in below.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

7-18-18 5:10 p.m. kawx.org

 

To listen to Mena NOAA Weather Radio on your PC, click anywhere on this line, or on the weather radio logo below. To listen on your phone, download a free Mena Weather Radio app from Google Play or the App Store, compliments of KAWX.

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POLK COUNTY SHERIFF'S LOG FOR July 9th Thru July 15th

SHERIFF’S LOG

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 9, 2018 – July 15, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

July 9, 2018

Report of a disturbance on Dove Lane near Hatfield. Deputy responded.

Report from complainant on Polk 77 near Mena of an attempted break-in, causing $25.00 in damages to a door knob. Investigation continues.

Report from Montgomery County of a missing individual that was believed to be in Polk County. The person was later located in Polk County.

Report from a Mena woman of problems involving child custody exchange.

Report from complainant on Polk 49 near Shady Grove of suspicious activity. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.

Report from a Glenwood man of problems regarding child custody exchange. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.

Arrested was Lonnie G. Tyler, 49, of Mena, on a Warrant for Harassment

Arrested was Tina M. Richey, 31, of Cove, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.

Arrested was Bobby R. May, 30, of Mena, on Warrants for Leaving the Scene of an Accident and three counts of Failure to Comply with a Court Order.

 

July 10, 2018

Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Hatfield of a scam involving prepaid cash cards, totaling losses at $950.00. Investigation continues.

Report from complainant on Polk 24 near Cove of damage done to a vehicle window. Investigation continues.

Arrested was Taylor Higgins, 23, of Mena, on a Warrant for Disorderly Conduct.

 

July 11, 2018

Arrested was Charles D. Morgan, 41, of Mena, on a Probation Hold.

 

July 12, 2018

Report from complainant of a disturbance that had occurred earlier. Complainant refused to press charges.

 

July 13, 2018

Report of a disturbance on Polk 753 near Mena led to Citations for Disorderly Conduct being issued to Tina R. Green, 48, and Michelle S. Green, 27, both of Perryville.

Report from complainant on Polk 412 near Shady of damage to lights, and the theft of tools and lumber, totaling losses at $450.00. Investigation continues.

Arrested was Robert Castillo, 49, of Mena, on a Charge of Domestic Battery 3rd Degree.

Arrested was Sheila M. Akers, 40, of Cove, on a Warrant for Probation Violation.

 

July 14, 2018

Report of a motorcycle accident on Polk 48 near Potter led to Citations for Public Intoxication, Expired Tags and No Proof of Insurance being issued to Thomas E. Hendershot, 66, of Mena.

Report of a structure fire on Polk 42 near Mena. Deputy responded.

Report from complainant on Anders Avenue in Hatfield of the theft of various items from a rental property. Investigation continues.

Report of a disturbance on Polk 121 near Mena led to the arrest of Matthew P. Owen, 22, of Mena, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.

Report of a structure fire on Polk 58 near Board Camp. Deputy responded.

Arrested was Robert L. Wallis, 37, of Mena, on a Parole Hold.

 

July 15, 2018

Report of a disturbance on Polk 28 near Hatfield. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.

Arrested was Christopher Ortega, 18, of Mena, on a Warrant for Criminal Contempt.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked four vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 30 Incarcerated Inmates, with 6 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

PC18-00459

 

7-17-18 4:43 p.m. kawx.org

 

To listen to the Mena, AR - Polk County, AR Online Police and Fire Radio Scanner, click anywhere on this linem, or on the police scanner below.

 

 

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Mena Police Department Reports For The Week of July 8, 2018 through July 14, 2018

Mena Police Department Reports For The Week of July 8, 2018 through July 14, 2018
 
 
July 8, 2018
 
Travis E. Davis, 48, of Mena was charged with public intoxication.  The arrest followed a call from employees at a local retail store.
 
Report was made of an altercation between two local people.  No charges have been filed at this time.
 
July 9, 2018
 
Kevin Lee Fryar, 32, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from Polk County authorities.
 
Shelly L. Davis, 46, of Hatfield was arrested and charged with public intoxication after a call from a local resident.
 
Report was made of someone trespassing.  The responding party did not wish to press charges.
 
July 10 & 11
 
A local resident reported that a suspicious person was walking back and forth in front of their house.  The person was located and agreed not to come back to the area.
 
A Mena man reported that an individual who had been warned to stay away from the property had been there.  Case is pending further investigation.
 
July 12, 2018
 
John Hunter, 18, of Mena was served two warrants from Polk County.  The arrest was made after a call to a local residence regarding an altercation.
 
Two local women were cited for unlawful burning after officers responded to a call of a possible structure fire in a local neighborhood.  The fire was actually of household goods and rubbish which cannot be burned within the city limits of Mena.
 
Employees at a local store reported that someone had paid for items with a counterfeit $100.00 bill.  Case is pending location and interview of suspect.
 
July 13, 2018
 
Paul James, 35, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from Mena police.  He was booked into the Polk County Detention Center.
 
Jerry Higgins, 43, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant after officers responded to a call at the local probation and parole office.
 
Richard Smiley, 60, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass and criminal mischief after officers were called to a local apartment complex.
 
Report was made of an altercation between a Mena couple.  Case is pending completion of investigation and location and interview of all victims, suspects, and witnesses.
 
July 14, 2018
 
Tialisa Scurlock, 47 of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.
 
Report was made of a juvenile looking into parked cars at a local retail store.  The youth was located and released to his father.  Case is pending.
 
7-16-18 5:25 p.m. kawx.org 
 
 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address Report Is In: Arkansas Economy Is Strong

LITTLE ROCK – The numbers for the state's fiscal year are in, and, I am happy to report, the numbers are strong.
We finished the year with a surplus of more than $40 million, and we set aside additional savings in a long-term reserve fund.
The annual growth was the result of a 4.6 percent increase in individual income and a 3.4 percent increase in the collection of sales tax. In other words, more people in Arkansas are working, wages are up, and consumers are spending. All of this shows we have confidence in the future.
This is also the result of a conservative approach on the spending side of the ledger. As a state, we are spending our money wisely, and reducing the size of government where we can without cutting out essential services.
The numbers tell us that Arkansans are working, and that business in Arkansas is booming.
The latest figures from the Arkansas Economic Development Commission show that 72,500 more Arkansans are employed than in January 2015.
Arkansas’s unemployment rate has remained at or below the national average for 38 consecutive months and currently stands at 3.8 percent.
For several months last year, the unemployment rate was 3.4 percent, which is the lowest in the history of Arkansas.
Since January 2015, the Economic Development Commission has signed incentive agreements with 380 new and expanding companies in the state.
These 380 projects have produced approximately 14,500 new jobs in Arkansas.
These companies have infused our economy with $8 billion in new capital investment.
The average wage for the new jobs is over $20 per hour, which is an annual salary of approximately $43,000.
This is the second year we have had a budget surplus. Last year, the surplus was $15 million.
I also mentioned we have set up a long term reserve fund. This is money we have set aside for a time when the economy might not be as strong as it is today. This is money that can pave the way for future tax cuts, which will make us more competitive with our surrounding states. This is a great opportunity for us to increase the amount of money in our long-term reserve fund, which now has a balance of more than $120 million.
Arkansas’s economy is at a good place, and our budget for next year will continue our trend of careful spending, wise streamlining, and ever-improving efficiency.
7-14-18 9:37 a.m. kawx.org 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

When temperatures in Arkansas rise, it is difficult to imagine that any parent could ever leave their child alone in a vehicle, but it is possible and often fatal.

 

Nationwide, an average of 37 children die each year in hot cars. Even the best of parents or caregivers can unknowingly leave a sleeping baby in a car; and the end result can be injury or even death.

 

 The Arkansas Department of Human Services and Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) has tips for parents to stop this tragedy before it starts.

 

To ensure your child's safety, always check your vehicle for children before you leave, and if parents find themselves in this scenario, "ACT." Before locking the vehicle and leaving it, families must avoid forgetting the child, create reminders and take action, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Safe Kids Worldwide campaigns.

 

— Avoid this event by never leaving a child alone in a vehicle for any amount of time. When the vehicle is unattended, lock the doors so that children cannot enter.

 

— Create reminders. Place a purse, briefcase or phone near the child's car seat to ensure that you will look before leaving your vehicle. Parents or grandparents can also place a stuffed animal in the child's car seat when it is not in use and place the stuffed animal in the passenger seat when the child is riding with them. This will remind adults to check for the child. Be certain of a child's location at all times, and plan ahead with caregivers to call and inform you of whether he or she is present.

 

T — Take action if you see a child left in a vehicle. Call 911 immediately, and if possible, rescue the child from the vehicle after receiving emergency instructions.

 

Though parents may think prior air-conditioning will help to keep their car cool after they exit, they should know that within five minutes on a 90-degree day, the temperature within a vehicle reaches that of the outdoors, and for every nine minutes the interior temperature increases 15 degrees.

 

For more resources visit www.archildrens.org.

 

7-13-18 4:34 p.m. kawx.org 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column-Implementing Reforms at VA Requires Strong Leadership

The Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs continues passing bills to create more efficient programs to serve the needs of our veterans. Since last year, 16 of those bills have been signed into law including measures improving access to healthcare, strengthening benefits and holding Department of Veterans Affairs employees accountable. It’s essential that we have the leadership at the VA to implement these reforms and ensure our veterans get the care they earned.

 

In June, President Donald Trump signed into law landmark legislation that reforms VA’s healthcare delivery system – helping provide veterans with more choices and fewer barriers to care. That same month, the House and Senate both passed legislation to provide strong funding for the VA. Congress has given the VA the tools to provide our veterans with quality care. Now the department needs the leadership to implement and carry out these changes.

 

Earlier this year, President Trump nominated Robert Wilkie to serve as Secretary of the VA to execute this task. Having served our nation in uniform, as well as experiencing military life as the son of a wounded combat soldier, his extensive career in a wide range of defense and veterans’ issues make him uniquely qualified to lead the department. He clearly understands the complexities associated with serving our nation and the importance of taking care of our veterans.

 

Wilkie served as Acting Secretary of the VA, and as such, he is well aware of the challenges facing the department. Accepting responsibility to improve the culture at the agency, implement the reforms passed by Congress, improve access to care through the use of the Electronic Health Records Program and reduce the disability claims backlog is a huge undertaking, but one that he committed to me that he wholeheartedly accepts. The Senate is ready and willing to help him and the VA succeed in its mission.

 

On two occasions during Wilkie’s confirmation process, I expressed the need for him to commit to closely monitor the review process underway at the Fayetteville VA Medical Center. So far, the process has been efficient and effective, but we shouldn’t put our veterans in a position that requires a review of their cases. I urged Wilkie, should he be confirmed to lead the VA, to implement policies to prevent such tragedies from happening at VA facilities in the future.

 

Senate-passed legislation that included funding for veterans’ benefit programs also contained a provision I introduced that requires the VA to submit a departmental response plan to Congress that can be applied in Fayetteville—and all future cases of disclosures—and provide recommendations about changes necessary to prevent such incidents. We will work to include this measure in the final version of the bill.

 

I appreciate Robert Wilkie’s willingness to serve as Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs and look forward to working with him to ensure successful implementation of programs to improve veterans’ services.

 

Senator John Boozman

 

7-13-18 3:18 p.m. kawx.org

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Rutledge Asks Retailers to Remove Unwashed Poppy Seeds from Shelves Says, 'unwashed poppy seeds contain substantial amounts of morphine, codeine and thebaine'

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge today announced she has sent a letter to online retailers, including Amazon, Ebay and Etsy, requesting the removal of unwashed poppy seeds from online products. In May, Attorney General Rutledge released an Attorney General Alert warning of the dangers of unwashed poppy seeds and telling the story of Stephen Hacala, who died from morphine intoxication after consuming so-called poppy seed tea made from unwashed poppy seeds.

 

“This letter outlines the unknown dangers of unwashed poppy seeds,” said Attorney General Rutledge. “Although washed poppy seeds are approved for consumption for use such as baking ingredients, unwashed poppy seeds can contain substantial amounts of morphine, codeine and thebaine, which are harmful Schedule II controlled substances.”

 

Earlier this year, Attorney General Rutledge met with Steve and Betty Hacala to hear the heartbreaking story of their son, Stephen. Stephen had purchased unwashed poppy seeds from Amazon to make so-called poppy seed tea, presumably with the hope of achieving the “trip” that online Amazon reviewers reference. In April 2016, Stephen was found dead in his apartment in Fayetteville with a partially used 5-pound bag of poppy seeds and a water bottle containing some of the wet seeds. An autopsy, performed by Dr. Stephen Erickson at the Arkansas State Crime Lab, revealed that Stephen Hacala died of morphine intoxication.

 

“We want to thank General Rutledge and her office for taking proactive actions to warn consumers and to motivate online and traditional retailers to remove unwashed poppy seeds for sale,” said Steve Hacala. “There is no legitimate use for unwashed poppy seeds, and their sale and distribution needs to be stopped to protect consumers and close another channel for users to obtain opioids. These actions will save lives.”

 

“I have tried to separate myself from the pain of these families for 25 years now,” Dr. Erickson said. “But when a loved one like Stephen Hacala dies, I technically become that family’s doctor. I’m just so tired of seeing the heartbreak. You shouldn’t be able to buy these things off the internet that are so dangerous and can kill you so easily.”

 

Attorney General Rutledge is asking these online retailers to remove all unwashed poppy seeds from their online catalogs and affiliated stores to help prevent the deaths of consumers in the future. Walmart has already taken action to no longer be part of the problem by removing unwashed poppy seeds from their shelves.

 

About Attorney General Leslie Rutledge

 

Leslie Carol Rutledge is the 56th Attorney General of Arkansas. She is the first woman and first Republican in Arkansas history to be elected to the office. Since taking office, she has begun a Mobile Office program, a Military and Veterans Initiative, a Metal Theft Prevention program and a Cooperative Disability Investigations program. She has led efforts to teach internet safety, combat domestic violence and make the office the top law firm for Arkansans. Rutledge serves as Chairwoman of the Republican Attorneys General Association and Chairwoman of the National Association of Attorneys General Southern Region. She also re-established and co-chairs the National Association of Attorneys General Committee on Agriculture.

 

A native of Batesville, she is a graduate of the University of Arkansas and the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law. Rutledge clerked for the Arkansas Court of Appeals, was Deputy Counsel for Gov. Mike Huckabee, served as a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney in Lonoke County and subsequently was an Attorney at the Department of Human Services before serving as Counsel at the Republican National Committee. Rutledge and her husband, Boyce, have a home in Pulaski County and a farm in Crittenden County.

 

 

7-13-18 1:39 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague- The Lottery, Medical Marijuana

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

July 13, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas lottery set a record for ticket sales in the fiscal year that ended on June 30, and will generate almost $92 million for college scholarships.

 

When the Higher Education Department awards Academic Challenge Scholarships in the fall, the number of scholarships provided by lottery ticket sales will exceed 300,000. Since Arkansas voters approved a constitutional amendment to establish a state lottery, $781 million has been generated for the scholarship program.

 

The lottery first began selling tickets in September of 2009. At the end of June, there were 1,926 retailers in Arkansas selling lottery tickets.

 

The funding for scholarships was generated by almost $500 million in ticket sales. The actual amount of $499,704,976 was a record for the Arkansas lottery.

 

Instant ticket sales, such as scratch-offs, were a record total of $407.6 million for the fiscal year. That is a record for instant tickets.

 

Sales of tickets for draw games, such as Powerball and Mega Millions, were $92.1 million. That is the second highest. The record was set in 2016, when sales spiked because of widespread interest in a Powerball prize of more than $1 billion.

 

The lottery paid $342 million in prizes, also a record amount for Arkansas. It was $27 million more than the amount paid to winners in 2012, the year with the second-highest payout in prizes.

 

Since it began, the lottery has sold about $3.9 billion in tickets and paid out more than $2.6 billion in prizes. Retailers that sell lottery tickets have made $224 million in commissions.

 

Last year prizes made up 67.9 percent of the lottery’s distribution of revenue. Scholarships were 19 percent, commissions to retailers was 5.6 percent, gaming costs was 4.2 percent and sales and administration was 3.2 percent.

 

The lottery began a new branding campaign in March, entitled “This Is Winning,” to highlight the various types of games and prizes. It includes 30-second television spots, outdoor ads such as billboards and posters that are placed in retail stores. Also, the promotional campaign has digital advertisements for the lottery on online, such as on social media. The lottery website is more accessible to mobile phones.

 

The campaign features interviews with lottery winners and scholarship recipients, focusing on winning has changed their lives.

 

Medical Marijuana

 

The Medical Marijuana Commission announced the five businesses that will get initial licenses to cultivate marijuana. The announcement came very soon after the state Supreme Court lifted an injunction, issued by a lower court, which had held up the process of awarding licenses.

 

Voters approved a constitutional amendment legalizing medical marijuana and creating the commission to regulate cultivation and retail sales. Five companies were selected from the 98 applicants. One of the unsuccessful applicants filed a legal challenge that brought the process to a halt when a circuit judge ruled that there were flaws in the selection process.

 

The commission also must award licenses to 32 dispensaries, and has received 230 applications. So far, the Health Department has issued more than 5,500 cards to patients certifying that they have one of the 18 qualifying conditions that will allow them to purchase medical marijuana.

 

Observers expect further legal challenges.

 

7-13-18 9:22 a.m. kawx.org 

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President Trump Appoints Governor Hutchinson To Council of Governors

LITTLE ROCK – President Trump today announced his intention to nominate Governor Asa Hutchinson to a two-year term on the 10-member Council of Governors. 

“President Trump’s nomination is an honor for me and for Arkansas,” Governor Hutchinson said. “It will be a privilege for me to represent our state and to serve the nation as a member of the Council of Governors.  With key military installations in Arkansas, it is an important opportunity to serve on the council, which advises on national defense and security issues.”
 
President Trump’s announcement of his intent to appointment Governor Hutchinson to the Council of Governors was included in a press release today that announced several key appointments.

The Council of Governors was created by the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2008 and formally established by Executive Order on January 11, 2010. The Council is intended to serve as a mechanism for governors and key federal officials to address matters pertaining to the National Guard, homeland defense, and defense support to civil authorities.
 
7-12-18 5:57 p.m. kawx.org 

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July Programs at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area near Wickes, Ecology Camp July 24th - 26th

For more information about any of these programs, call the State Park at (870) 385-2201.

 

Friday, July 13

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Nutty Squirrels (1 hour) How nutty are you? Do you have what it takes to be the last squirrel standing? Meet a park interpreter as we test out your aliveness and agility in this interactive game. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Macroinvertebrate Snorkeling Scavenger Relay (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we explore Cossatot River’s water creatures to recognize who is who and if we can organize them by their water tolerance levels in a fun and interact relay activity. Plan to get in the water. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Sandbar Parking Lot.

 

12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Otter Steals Fish (1 hour) Have you ever seen a Great Blue Heron catch a fish? Meet a park interpreter for this flurry of fun, as we uncover animal behaviors and predicaments. Come prepared to make a splash! Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Picture Perfect! (1 hour) It’s winter time and the park is ready for its close up! Meet a park interpreter on a small hike on the River Corridor Trail so we can take some photos with our cameras or eyes. Dress for the weather and no flip-flops or sandals. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

Saturday, July 14

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Tree ID (1 hour) Join a park interpreter to beat the heat and enjoy a short hike on the shaded Brushy Creek Trail. We will discover how trees play an important role in protecting the Cossatot River. We will also learn some tips that will help you identify many of the trees that are found along the trail. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Snorkeling Scavenger Hunt (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we venture out on a section of the Cossatot River and go on a scavenger hunt to find several intriguing objects while enjoying the clean, clear, cool Cossatot River water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Testing the Waters (1 hour) The Cossatot River journeys through Gilliam Lake and meanders all the way down to the Arkansas River. The health of the river determines what life can survive there. Meet Park Interpreter Flanary as we test the waters of Cossatot River to determine how healthy our river is and what type of diversity we can find in the river. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area. 

 

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Banks Alive! (1 hour) Take a walk on the wild side and discover what it takes to survive in the harsh environment along the banks of the Cossatot River. A park interpreter will be your guide on this adventure. Prepare to get a little wet. Meeting Place: Sandbar Parking Lot.

 

Sunday, July 15

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Fishing Frenzy (1 hour) Fish can be found all around you when you are enjoying the Cossatot River. Join a park interpreter to have fun catching fish and discovering what types of fish call the Cossatot River home. Meeting Place: Sandbar Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Water Town Ball (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we venture back in time and learn to play an old-fashioned, friendly game of town ball, but with a twist. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Friday, July 20

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Hiss, Rattle & Roll (1 hour) Meet a park interpreter and a few of the snakes that live in Arkansas. We will discover the characteristics of the dangerous six and be able to tell them apart from harmless snakes. Games and activities will conclude the presentation. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Saturday, July 21

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Focus Factor (1 hour) No fancy zoom lens? No problem! It’s not easy, but you can still get a great wild life photo without new or fancy equipment. Meet a park interpreter who will show you how. Are you up to the challenge? Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Snorkeling Scavenger Hunt (1 hour) Join a park interpreter(s) as we venture out on a section of the Cossatot River and go on a scavenger hunt to find several intriguing objects while enjoying the clean, clear, cool Cossatot River water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:00p.m. Firekeeper (1 hour) Do you like treasure hunting? Do you like sneaking and getting caught? Here is your chance to see how well you can sneak in and sneak out without the Firekeeper hearing you as you take a piece of the fire with you. Meet a park interpreter as we have fun in this interactive game. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area. 

 

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Cossatot Craft Corner (1 hour) Do you enjoy being creative? Would you like to begin earning an explorer badge? Meet a park interpreter to use your creativity, have fun, and discover something special that can be found in the park. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room. 

 

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Pebbles and Rocks (1 hour) Every pebble and rock tells a story of how the earth was formed, shaped, and changed over time. Join a park interpreter as we notice some of the different characteristics, shapes and forms of pebbles and rocks that help make up Cossatot River. We will also take a look at understanding the rock cycle and become familiar with some examples by doing a few activities, hunts and games. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

7:15 p.m. – 8:15 p.m. Do You Speak Frog (1 hour) Many insects “sing” at night, but did you know that most of Cossatot’s nighttime noise comes from frogs? Can you communicate with them? Hop on over to the Visitor Center tonight to find out more about our local frogs and learn fun ways to identify their musical sounds. You’ll even have a chance to join the “Frog Chorus!” Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

Sunday, July 22

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Creating Animals (1 hour) How creative is your mind and your team? Meet a park interpreter in a couple of games like Charades and Pictionary, to see if you can imitate selected Cossatot River State Park creatures. The challenge is on! May the best team win! Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Fishing Frenzy (1 hour) Fish can be found all around you when you are enjoying the Cossatot River. Join a park interpreter to have fun catching fish and discovering what types of fish call the Cossatot River home. Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Water Town Ball (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we venture back in time and learn to play an old-fashioned, friendly game of town ball, but with a twist. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Tuesday, July 24 – Thursday, July 26 Ecology Camp

 

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Ecology Camp (7 hours) Explore the secrets of nature by discovering what an ecosystem is and what ecosystem you are in at Cossatot River State Park. You'll participate in hands-on activities, close-up nature studies, and experience adventure! Enjoy healthy outdoor fun through ecology experiments, wade in or along the Cossatot River and discover the many different types of water life while fostering a deep connection to nature. $50/camper, Fee includes: a gift bag, daily snacks, and lunch the last day.) Reservations are required by calling (870) 385-2201. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

Friday, July 27

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Snorkeling Scavenger Hunt (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we venture out on a section of the Cossatot River and go on a scavenger hunt to find several intriguing objects while enjoying the clean, clear, cool Cossatot River water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Sandbar Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Nutty Squirrels (1 hour) How nutty are you? Do you have what it takes to be the last squirrel standing? Meet a park interpreter as we test out your aliveness and agility in this interactive game. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center Picnic Area.

 

Saturday, July 28

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Testing the Waters (1 hour) The Cossatot River journeys through Gilliam Lake and meanders all the way down to the Arkansas River. The health of the river determines what life can survive there. Meet a park interpreter(s) as we test the waters of Cossatot River to determine how healthy our river is and what type of diversity we can find in the river. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Look at Those Teeth! (1 hour) Looking at an animal’s teeth can tell you a lot about their life! Have you ever wondered why a beaver’s teeth look orange? Do snakes even have teeth!? Join a park interpreter to learn the answers to these questions and many more. Meeting Place: Brushy Creek Picnic Area.

 

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Head Honcho (1 hour) You want a challenge? Meet a park interpreter for this game that challenges everybody to use their Owl Eyes, the sharp wit and awareness of a tracker for the Head Honcho, and a pok-er-face and rhythmic abilities for the Tracker Detective. Plan to be in the river some of the time. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below the Visitor Center.

 

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Blindfold Drum Stalk (1 hour) Meet a park interpreter on this challenging opportunity to put your senses to the test. This exciting game requires silence and listening to navigate through the course. Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

8:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Spider Sniffing (1 hour) Have you ever been spider sniffing? I can’t go into details, as it is a secret society, but if you would like to know what it is all about, meet with a park interpreter at Cossatot River State Park who will introduce you to many enjoyable spider sniffing days. Meeting Place: Cossatot Fall’s Parking Lot.

 

Sunday, July 29

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Fox-Walking (1 hour) How many of you like to see wildlife? Who would like to learn how to get close to wild animals? Meet with a park interpreter as we learn how, then head out to try it out. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Picnic Area.

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Animal Senses (1 hour) Have you ever wondered how well your senses are in the outdoors? Meet with a park interpreter as we explore and expand our senses by imitating different animals here at Cossatot River through interactive games and activities. Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Water Town Ball (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we venture back in time and learn to play an old-fashioned, friendly game of town ball, but with a twist. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Tuesday, July 31

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Lost and Found (1 hour) The program “Lost and Found,” has been developed to help prepare children for a situation we all hope will never happen—becoming lost in the outdoors. Children will become “aware of five basic skills” that will help them to survive and be found should they ever become lost in an outdoor environment. In addition, the program stresses preventative actions children can take to avoid becoming lost in the first place. Meet with a park interpreter to guide you through this program and discover the “five basic skills.” Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Hives & Honey (1 hour) Honeybees are fascinating insects who’s uniquely designed physical and social structures contribute to their survival and success. Join a park interpreter as we discover why honeybees are so special. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. PEAK! (1 hour) How many have been hiking, camping, fishing, boating or on a picnic? Do you have a favorite place you like to visit? If you answered Yes! Join park interpreter(s) to discover how to make your adventures exciting and memorable. Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

For more information about any of these programs, call the State Park at (870) 385-2201.

 

7-12-18 5:46 p.m. kawx.org

 

 

 

 

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Arkansas Wildlife Fishing Report

July 11, 2018

Jim Harris

 

Weekly Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for July 11, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

Central Arkansas

North Arkansas

Northwest Arkansas

Northeast Arkansas

Southeast Arkansas

Southwest Arkansas

South-Central Arkansas

West-Central Arkansas

East Arkansas

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality


CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Craig D. Campbell Lake Conway Reservoir

NOTICE: An irrigation restriction on Lake Conway will be in effect through March 1, 2019. The irrigation restriction will allow the AGFC to apply Environmental Protection Agency-approved aquatic herbicides to treat and reduce the spread of alligator weed, a non-native, invasive aquatic plant. Herbicides used will not cause harm to aquatic organisms, such as fish, and are not harmful to people or wildlife that may come into contact with treated vegetation or water. Herbicides that will be used have up to a 120-day irrigation restriction after application. Therefore, the AGFC strongly recommends adjacent landowners DO NOT irrigate water from Lakes Conway for lawn or garden use during this period.

(updated 7-11-2018) Bates Field and Stream (501-470-1846) says the water level is down about a foot from normal. The clarity is clear and the surface temperature was a whopping 98 degrees. Therefore, what is typically a great crappie lake has no crappie to report this week. They’re hiding from the heat. Bream are fair with worms, particularly nightcrawlers. Bass reports have been fair. Anglers are having best success with spinnerbaits and frogs. Catfishing is fair with nightcrawlers and shrimp. Pretty much, they say, the fishing overall hasn’t changed from last week.


Little Red River

(updated 7-11-2018) Lowell Myers of Sore Lip’em All Guide Service said they continue to see typical summertime generation of early afternoon and evening generation, providing wading opportunities on the upper river in mornings and lower river in afternoons. For fly-fishing, he recommends midges, hare’s ears, sowbugs and streamers. Hot pink and purple bodies on chartreuse jigheads are recommended for Trout Magnet spin fishing. Remember to practice your best boating, canoeing/kayaking and wading etiquette and be safe while enjoying the Little Red River. Always check before heading to the Little Red River by calling the Army Corps of Engineers Little Rock District water data system (501-362-5150) for Greers Ferry Dam water release information or check the Corps of Engineers website (swl-wc.usace.army.mil) for real-time water release and the Southwestern Power Administration website (swpa.gov) to see forecasted generation schedule.

(updated 7-11-2018) Greg Seaton of littleredflyfishingtrips.com (501-690-9166) said Tuesday, “Well, today was one of those days. As a guide, I sometimes think I’ve got these trout all figured out. Wrong!! Just when you think you have it all going your way and you know what the fish want and how they want it, up pops a day when the fish humble you. Gary and Joyce fished with me today and as we were starting Gary saw a ‘mop’ fly in my fly box and asked if I had any luck using the fly. I told him I had tied some but had not had much success using them. As the morning progressed we were having trouble getting the fish to hit any of the flies I had been successfully using the last several days. Gary asked if he might try one of the mop flies and I tied it on. You guessed it! First cast and he caught a fish. The rest of the morning was productive with Gary and Joyce getting strikes and landing several rainbows.
“If all else fails, try something new and different. I learn something new on the river each day. It never hurts to try something out of the ordinary when your standard flies aren’t working. Fish may also be curious about something they don’t see every day. Thanks, Gary, for a suggestion that saved the day!”
Greg says the river remains clear with afternoon generation.

Greers Ferry Lake

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 460.09 feet msl (normal conservation pool: 462.04 feet msl Oct. 1-April 30; 463.04 feet msl May 1-June 1; 462.54 feet msl June 1-Sept. 30).

(updated 7-11-2018) Tommy Cauley of Fishfinder Guide Service (501-940-1318) said the water level at Greers Ferry Lake was at 460.19 feet msl on Tuesday and falling with generation and evaporation. It is 2.35 feet below normal pool of 462.54 feet msl for this time of year. The catching is off as it is all around the South right now dealing with this strong weather pattern of front after front and east and northeast wind blowing all the time. It will break the cycle soon and the catch rate will go up quite a bit. You can catch one or two from an area and then they disappear and or won’t bite anymore. Switching tactics helps sometimes, but it is best to stay with what has always worked – just be patient and move to another area. Timing is a big issue right now catching them on the feed. We also have a late shad spawn and some of the fry they are eating are tiny, very small bait fish. Just stick with what brought ya’ to the dance. The catfishing is steady around the lake with catches coming in on a variety of baits on a variety of methods; that bite has been most consistent of all. The crappie are down about 18-20 feet on down to 40 feet suspended in pole timber or over or around brush piles; use minnows or jigs tipped with minnows for the best bite. The bream are shallow out to about 20 feet eating crawlers and crickets the best. Walleye fishing and catching is not good at the moment. Conditions are not favoring the bite very well, but a few are being caught because they have to eat. They’re biting crawlers in 18-28 feet of water. The bass fishing is going with the windblown shad; try spinnerbaits, chasing the west banks where wind has piled the shad up, or drops off of points, humps, ledges in 15-40 feet of water with a big worm Texas-rigged or a C-rig. The hybrid and white bass are eating on and off all day all around the lake, as catch rates are down right now as well. Some are schooling, some are not. Try spoons, inline spinners and swimbaits for the best success in 28-55 feet.

Harris Brake Lake 

(updated 7-11-2018) Harris Brake Lake Resort (501-889-2745) said the water is clear and the temperature of the water is a hot 94 degrees. The water level is a little low, they say. Bream are fair on worms or crickets. No reports on crappie. Bass are fair, early in the day and late in the evening, on spinnerbaits and plastic worms. Catfishing is fair with worm.

Lake Overcup

NOTICE: An irrigation restriction on Lake Overcup will be in effect through March 1, 2019. The irrigation restriction will allow the AGFC to apply Environmental Protection Agency-approved aquatic herbicides to treat and reduce the spread of alligator weed, a non-native, invasive aquatic plant. Herbicides used will not cause harm to aquatic organisms, such as fish, and are not harmful to people or wildlife that may come into contact with treated vegetation or water. Herbicides that will be used have up to a 120-day irrigation restriction after application. Therefore, the AGFC strongly recommends adjacent landowners DO NOT irrigate water from Lakes Overcup for lawn or garden use during this period.

(updated 7-4-2018) Johnny “Catfish” Banks at Overcup Bait Shop and R.V. Park (501-354-9007) said crappie are being caught in deeper water. Not a lot have been caught, but some really nice ones are being hooked. Bass are doing well around brush tops and structure with topwater baits and plastic worms. They are chasing the new spawn of shad and hitting topwater baits. Catfish are being caught on jugs and trotlines using perch and trotline minnows. Bream are doing well on crickets, but you have to find them and then you will catch some good-sized ones. Water level is about normal and clarity is good. Surface temperature is around 87 degree. “Everyone be safe and have a great 4th of July,” he said.

Brewer Lake

(updated 7-11-2018) Larry Walters at Bones Bait Shop (501-354-9900) said the lake is clear and the surface water temperature is ranging 85-90 degrees. The level is about 4 feet low and they need rain, Larry says. The fishing is good, though, and Larry notes that the parking lots are now paved. Bream reports have been fair. Crappie are fair in about 5-7 feet of water and are biting minnows and jigs. Bass are fair; best bet is to work the shoals with spinnerbaits or crankbaits. Catfish are good. They appear to be spawning and will bite chicken livers or crappie minnows, plus the shad. Look for them close to the bank. Anglers are having fair success catching white bass.

Lake Maumelle

(updated 7-11-2018) Jolly Rogers Marina (501-868-5558) said the largemouth bass bite is excellent. With water temps in the 80s the bass are about 10-20 feet deep. Some are just outside of the grass. Try using Zoom Trick Worms, crankbaits, jerkbaits and jigs in 6-8 and 10-15 feet of water. A few can also be caught in shallow water on Pop-Rs, spinnerbaits and chatterbaits. Largemouths continue to bite more during dusk and dawn. Last Tuesday (July 3) anglers enjoyed a good bass bite, with Matt Hedrick and Brandon Crain hauling in the Big Bass of 4.24 pounds and winning the tournament with an 11.12-pound stringer, edging Lee Brizzo and We Louder with 10.92 pounds. Kentucky bass are off the grass line and also about 8-12 feet deep. Rocky banks or points are best with a crankbait or jig. The bite is good. White bass are excellent. There have been reports of whites schooling near the dam from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Use Rooster Tails, CC Spoons, deep-diving Bandits, and Bombers. Crappie are good. More reports of crappie being found near brush piles and structures anywhere from 12-20 feet deep. Try using spider rigs and minnows early in the morning or later in the evening. Bream are good. Bream are being caught 6-12 feet deep and on brush piles. Try using crickets, worms or jigs anywhere from 3-12 feet depth. Catfish are excellent. More reports this week of the channel cats starting to move out and the blues coming in. Try stink bait and bream around 8-10 feet and 20 feet deep. Had another 40-pound catfish caught last week off the banks.

Sunset Lake

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said people have been hitting Sunset pretty hard because it was stocked twice just last month. One stocking was with tagged catfishranging from 5-40 pounds and somewhere between 10 and 20 tagged ones with prizes for the tags ranging from tackle boxes, to rod-and-reel combos, to gift cards to a water board and a kayak. As for bait, you name it, they have been taking it there, from fresh chicken livers, to nightcrawlers, to various kinds of stink baits. Bream have been doing great on crickets and redworms. Bass have been doing well on brooder minnows and white and chartreuse buzzbaits. Crappie have been slow on crappie minnows. Lisa says she heard that the turtles have been plentiful out there, too.

Bishop Park Ponds

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said that from what she has been hearing it has been pretty slow over there. An occasional small bream or so. We just need some rain to get the levels back up and also to maybe wash some of those out of the creek over into the ponds.

Saline River Access in Benton

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said bass have been doing great on brooder minnows, with small split shot and using a No, 2 plain shank hook. Catfish are being caught on trotlines using black salties and goldfish. Crappie on Kalin's Tennessee Shad Grubs and crappie minnows. Bream are doing great on crickets.
Lisa adds about hot spots outside her usual coverage that Lake Ouachita provided great big crappie for one of my customers and his family using small crappie minnows. And another customer been doing great on catfish at Lake Sylvia using fresh chicken livers. He said his kids love this lake for the swimming area, too.

Lake Norrell

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said crappie have been slow on crappie minnows. Bass have been good on brooder minnows and various crankbaits. Catfish have been hitting bass minnows, nightcrawlers and chicken livers. Bream have been biting deep using a crickets.

Lake Sylvia

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said a customer of hers been doing great on catfish using fresh chicken livers. He said his kids love this lake for the swimming area, too.

Lake Winona

(updated 7-11-2018) Lisa Spencer at Lisa’s Bait Shop (501-778-6944) said crappie have been good on small crappie minnows. Bream are good on crickets. Bass have been hitting brooder minnows and buzzbaits. Catfish are doing well on chicken livers and bait shrimp.

Arkansas River at Morrilton

(updated 7-11-2018) Charley’s Hidden Harbor at Oppelo (501-354-8080) said they’ve had a few kayaks come in. One couple dropped off here and went to Toad Suck. Good to see kayaks using the river. Black bass are biting well early and late when the water is up on the grass line and when down on the wood structure. Lots of shad around. Use shad-colored crankbaits for good results. Catfish are good and are biting early by the grass, too. Use shad. Later during the day, fish with catalpa worms in 8-20 feet depth. White bass are chasing shad schools. Go with shallow-running shad-colored crankbaits. Crappie have been caught in the Petit Jean River. Try floating a jig in 6-12 feet water. Red and chartreuse is the color. Reports are fair. There has been a great shad hatch.

Arkansas River (Cadron Pool)

(updated 7-11-2018) Professional angler Cody Kelley with Best in Bass Guide Service (501-733-5282) had no report.

Little Maumelle River

(updated 7-11-2018) River Valley Marina (501-517-1250) said the clarity is clear and the surface water temperature is 84 degrees as of Monday morning. Water level and current are normal. Crappie are good on minnows or jigs. Bass are fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms, both early in the morning and after the sun sets. Catfish are excellent on trotlines. They’re biting worms and stink baits. No reports on bream.

Arkansas River (Maumelle Pool)

(updated 7-11-2018) Zimmerman’s Exxon (501-944-2527) said the water is clear and the level and current are normal. Surface temperature is in the high 80s. Bream are fair on worms and crickets. Crappiereports are good on minnows or jigs. Black bass are good, with the best bites coming early in the morning before the heat rises and late at night. Catfish are fair.

(updated 7-11-2018) Hatchet Jack’s (501-758-4948) said that near Murray Lock and Dam, the catfishing is fair using skipjack or slicks. No other reports.

Arkansas River (Little Rock Pool)

(updated 7-11-2018) Vince Miller from Fish ’N’ Stuff (501-834-5733) said the water is clearing up from its previous stained look. The temperature is in the mid- to high 80s. Water level and current are normal. Reports on bream catches were good. They’re biting redworms and nightcrawlers. No reports on crappie. Bass are fair. Fish for bass in 6-8 feet of water with crankbaits. Catfishing is fair below the dam using stink bait.

(updated 7-11-2018) Zimmerman’s Exxon (501-944-2527) said the water is clear and the surface temperature has been in the high 80s. The water level and current are normal. Bream are fair on worms or crickets. You’ll find them in the backwater around Willow Beach. Crappie are fair. Use hot pink jigs or minnows, and also try Fin Spins jigheads off the jetties. Look for them in 10-12 feet of water. Bass are good. They’re at a depth of 10-12 feet and are hitting spinnerbaits and crankbaits, as well as plum apple watermelon candy Trick Worms and shaky head worms. Closer to the Terry Lock and Dam, go with spinnerbaits and the Trick Worms or some type of plastic worm. Catfishing reports have been fair.

(updated 7-11-2018) McSwain Sports Center (501-945-2471) said that near the Terry Lock and Dam, water clarity is good the current and level are normal. No temperature was reported, but rest assured it's hot. Bream are fair on worms and crickets. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Bass are fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms. Catfish are good using worms.

(updated 7-11-2018) Hatchet Jack’s (501-758-4948) said that near Murray Lock and Dam, the catfishing is fair using skipjack or slicks. No other reports.

Clear Lake (off Arkansas River-Little Rock Pool)

(updated 7-11-2018) McSwain Sports Center (501-945-2471) said the water clarity is good, though it is hot. Water level and current are normal. Bream are good on worms or crickets. Crappie are fair on minnows or jigs. Bass are fair on spinnerbaits, topwater lures and plastic worms. Nothing reported on catfish.

Peckerwood Lake

(updated 7-11-2018) Herman’s Landing (870-241-3731) reported the water is clear, and while the water is low there are no stumps showing. No temperature was available; it's just hot, Donna said. No reports on bream. Crappie are fair. Anglers are trolling minnows and jigs. Bass are good on spinnerbaits and plastic worms. Catfishing is fair. Overall, she said, things are slow there.


 

NORTH ARKANSAS

White River

(updated 7-11-2018) Cotter Trout Dock (870-435-6525) says, “The Fourth of July holiday brought some longtime friends to the White River and allowed us to introduce some new anglers to the fishery.” Bull Shoals Lake is nearly 2 feet below the seasonal power pool target, so anglers have seen lower water levels throughout most of the day, between 2,500 to 3,100 cfs on average. Heavier generation in the late afternoons requires staying ahead of the rise or turning back on it and running upriver to clearer waters. The quality of rainbows exceeds the quantity, and many days the quantity rises above expectations. River minnows and soft-shell crawdads worked close to the bank captured the attention of more than a score of browns over the past seven days. Rainbows looked for their treat of shrimp and made for lots of happy anglers. Summertime temperatures can be brutal, so bring lots of water and electrolytes to stay hydrated. It's fun to see so much wildlife come to the river to cool off, get a drink and find refreshment in the heat, too. Visitors have shared the river with deer, eagles, foxes, mink, otters, herons, turtles and other animals this week. “We hope to see you there, too.”

(updated 7-11-2018) John Berry of Berry Brothers Guide Service in Cotter (870-435-2169) said late last week that during the past week, they have had no rain, brutally hot temperatures (to include heat advisories) and moderate winds. The lake level at Bull Shoals fell 1.2 feet to rest at 0.8 feet below seasonal power pool of 661.3 feet msl. This is 34.5 feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock fell 0.5 feet to rest at 0.5 feet below seasonal power pool and 14.5 feet below the top of flood pool. Beaver Lake fell 1.2 feet to rest at 0.3 feet below seasonal power pool and 7.9 feet below the top of flood pool. The White River had less generation but no wadable water. Norfork Lake fell 1 foot to rest at 0.4 feet below seasonal power pool of 556 feet msl and 24.4 feet below the top of flood pool. The Norfork had less generation and wadable water every day. Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are now below the top of power pool. With warmer weather and increased power demand for air conditioning, we can expect more generation in the afternoons, but there is a possibility of wadable water in the cooler mornings.
The White has fished well. The hot spot has been Rim Shoals. There are sulphurs coming off. The hot flies were olive Woolly Buggers (sizes 8, 10), Y2Ks (sizes 14, 12), prince nymphs (size 14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead sizes 16, 18), pheasant tails (size 14), ruby midges (size 18), root beer midges (size 18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (size 10) and sowbugs (size 16). Double-fly nymph rigs have been very effective (John’s current favorite is a size 14 bead-head pheasant tail with a size 18 ruby midge suspended below it). Use lead to get your flies down.
John also shares this lesson about equipment, “As a guide, I frequently am called on to provide loaner rods for my clients. Either they are new to the sport and don’t have one yet, they are traveling and did not want to bother with carrying one, or the broke their rod recently. I need to supply good reliable equipment that is durable and doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.
“I have three loaner rigs and my wife, Lori, has two. They are all the same. The rod is a Temple Fork Outfitter Lefty Kreh Professional Series two-piece, five-weight, 9-foot rod. When I bought them, they retailed for around $100 each. They have a lifetime guarantee that I have taken advantage of on several occasions. They are abused on a regular basis.
“The reels are old Orvis Battenkill 5/6 disc-drag reels. They retailed for about $80 when I bought them. They came with a lifetime guarantee and I have sent one back for a major repair. They have been beat up and a lot of the finish is missing. They still perform beautifully. I have an extra spool that is set up for left-handed fly-casters so that, when I have one, I can quickly switch the reel over to right-hand retrieve. I have a top-of-the-line fly line for each rig that retails for about $75. The whole rig cost a bit over $250, but I paid substantially less with my guide discount. I consider this to be the best rig for the money that I have found. When Lori and I fish together from the boat, we generally use our loaner rods because they fish well and are always in the back of my Suburban already rigged from my most recent guide trip.
“They were put to the test (last Thursday) on a guide trip. Lori was guiding Christi, a C.P.A. from Georgia. Christi said that she wanted to catch a lot of fish, so Lori took her to the White River. I was not working so I went along to run the boat and Lori could concentrate on landing trout.
“I got to the river a little early and I fished for a few minutes with a client rod before Lori and Christi arrived. I managed to catch a nice trout. When they got there, I motored over to the ramp and picked them up. Christi brought an Orvis Helios 3 fly rod with a Mirage Reel and a topnotch fly line. It was the same size and weight fly rod as the loaner but cost a bit over $1,500. While Lori rigged the rod, Christi used the loaner so that she could begin fishing sooner. She was into a trout almost immediately. It was a fat 18-inch rainbow. A few minutes later it was another rainbow and then another. It took Lori quite a while to rig the Helios because she was busy netting trout. When she got it rigged, Christi opted to continue fishing with the client rod because it was working well.
“Later in the day she was fighting a really big trout when the fish slipped the hook and the line came back and tangled around the rod. While Lori was dealing with the tangle, Christi took the Helios and began fishing. She wasn’t doing as well casting it and went back to the client rod when Lori got it untangled. She finished the day using the client rod.
“Christi landed 35 trout. The biggest was a 20-inch rainbow. They were all caught on the client rod. It is more important that a rod fish well than be expensive.”

(updated 7-11-2018) Sportsman’s White River Resort (870-453-2424) said the clarity the past week has been wonderful, even it it's hot weather. Two generators are running at the dam. The trout bite is good.Rainbows are biting PowerBait and Power Worms.

 

that with the weather so hot, the fishing has rated only fair of late. The water clarity is clear and there are 2-3 generators running regularly at the dam. The trout bite is fair to good. Rainbows are preferring PowerBait. Not many browns were reported caught.

Bull Shoals Lake

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 659.88 feet msl (normal conservation pool: 659.00 feet msl).

(updated 6-28-2018) Del Colvin at Bull Shoals Lake Boat Dock said lake level Thursday was at 661 feet msl, still about 2½ feet over the normal pool for this time of year. Temperature is about 84 degrees up to 90 depending on where you’re at. It’s been hot; Thursday was the hottest day of the year. The Corps been generating quite a bit of water, running about eight units a day, to get the lake level back down. And it’s summertime, the fishing’s pretty much going to stay the same for a while here. Expect a report every two weeks or so unless something major changes. Early in the morning there’s a good topwater bite still. You can throw a Zara Spook, you can walk the dog, throw a Sammy, Gunfish, anything of that nature. “There’s a small feeding window there, so if you get up really before the sun comes up and get ready beyond the water when it happens, it'll definitely pay off that first hour, hour and a half, sometimes two hours. We've had a lot of fronts come through lately, so if you can get it out before one of those storms come in without getting in trouble you'll do good,” Del said. Now, definitely you want to follow the shad around, he says. If you can find the bait, you're going to find the fish, so pay attention when you're out there. The main lake definitely has been better and it will continue to be as they generate water. The lake still has those fish out on the points, so as the sun comes out you want to fish the main lake points, secondary points, humps, islands, docks and brush piles anywhere in that 20-25 feet range. There is a drop-shot bite that's working, you can spoon them; get up around the docks as the spoon bite’s been pretty good. If you want to go in the back, you can do that if you get some runoff. You can definitely go in the back after one of the storms and get into the fish, but it's going to be hit or miss, that's for sure. Del and other anglers are still catching fish on the Whopper Plopper; they’re catching them in the bushes, those largemouth are relatively shallow early and it's hot out. Del says he’s fishing half-days now, and you can line up a trip with him. “Also if you want to get out and catch some fish you've got other options: the White River, which is right here, we’ve got bowfishing, we got the Fourth (July 4) coming up, the scuba guys have been out on the lake spearfishing for walleye and the walleye guys that are fishing are doing really good dragging bottom-bouncers. The last week was anywhere in the 20- to 28-foot range.”

(updated 6-27-2018) K Dock Marina on the Missouri side of Bull Shoals Lake said lots of fish were caught the last few weeks. Anglers are still doing great on almost all species of game fish. Water is hot and dropping fast, but the bite is still on if you can stand the heat and humidity. (The Army Corps of Engineers has now made this current lake level the new summer power pool after implementing the Minimum Flow Act several years ago.) Unfortunately the boat launch near K Dock will still not be usable at this level. This launch was designed to be used for a power pool of 654 feet msl. This launch was never raised before they changed the lake to the current level. “We believe it’s time to make some noise and tell the Corps that we need a high water boat launch! I will be posting a separate blog on this site about this project very soon.” Scott says the water temperature is ranging 87-90 degrees and the water is stained. Black bass are good on a variety of baits – topwater early morning and evening; jigs on points and steep rock bluffs, peanut butter and jelly are working good; large crankbaits and 8- to 10-inch plumb or blue fleck plastic worms. Walleye are good on trolling medium crankbaits. Keep the boat in about 20-25 feet for suspended walleye in the 12-18 feet range. Some walleye are being caught on larger crankbaits and bottom bouncers in the 20-30 feet range. They will really start to go deep if the surface temperature jumps above 90 degrees. Lots of 5- to 6-pound walleye were caught on white or silver spoons, vertical-jigging, around 20-25 feet of water off the points. Crappie are good to fair on live minnows in brush piles. Also some very large crappie are being caught trolling small to medium crankbaits a few feet from the high bluff sides of the lake.

Norfork Lake

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 555.30 feet msl (normal conservation pool: September-April 552.00 feet msl; April-September, 554.00 feet msl).

(updated 7-11-2018) Lou Gabric at Hummingbird Hideaway Resort said Norfork Lake is in its summer pattern. Fish are going deeper as the thermocline continues to drop. The thermocline appears to be in the 22-30 feet range, depending where you are located on the lake. Striped bass fishing continues to be very good. The best artificial method has been vertical-jigging with a spoon. If you are trolling, use a large swimbait or an umbrella rig with the same swimbaits attached to it. Live bait (threadfin or gizzard shad and large shiners) has been working the best for him, Lou said. “I am catching stripers 40-70 feet deep in 45-100 feet of water. Most of the fish I've caught over the last week that were 40 feet down have been hybrids. The striped bass has been deeper. Locations for the striped bass have not really changed much since my last report. I am finding them on the main lake as well as in some of the creeks. Channel swings where the water drops off to 80-plus feet very close to shore are one of the best areas. Long points where the channel is close are also holding some really good fish. I am finding striped bass from the 62 bridge area all the way down towards and beyond Hudson Point, a little east of the dam.”
Largemouth bass fishing has also been good. There is still some good topwater action right before sun up and as the sun is setting. Other times of the day you need to look for these fish on or slightly below the thermocline. Brush piles near the thermocline are also holding some nice fish. Catfish and walleye have also been biting very well. Lou says he has caught some really nice-sized channel and blue cats on live shad while fishing for striped bass. Most of the catfish came from 60-70 feet deep close to the bottom, especially when he has found deep bait. The same, as above, holds true for the walleye. You will also find nice walleye below the thermocline especially early and late in the day. Crawler harnesses are work very well, as well as live larger minnows.
Norfork Lake level is holding fairly stable and currently sits at 555.28 feet msl. Periodic power generation is occurring to hold the level close to the current normal seasonal pool. The surface water temperature is in the 86-90-degree range. The main lake is clear with some of the coves and creeks slightly stained.

(updated 7-11-2018) Tom Reynolds of STR Outfitters said the striper bite on Norfork Lake is still strong for the first two hours in the morning. “I have yet to find a secondary bite after 7:30 but will spend time this week finding new fish to catch. This week we have multiple days where both Sean and I have limited out in less than two hours. In any given morning we will have enough bite to use over 40 shad apiece. Some bites happen so fast the client cannot react to hook the fish and others are just plain misses.” He says there is still an afternoon bite but most times it really starts at sundown and only lasts for less than an hour. Now that we are in the summer pattern you will find them feeding in 40-120 feet of water. In the 40-foot range they will be on the bottom feeding. In deeper water the fish can be found in the 35-40-foot range feeding on shad. Tom and his anglers are catching stripers using 3- to 5-inch gizzard shad. The lower end of Norfork seems to be where the better bite is. Tom says he’s seeing striper guides from the upper portion of the lake fishing near us. This tells me that the fish are moving south looking for cooler water with more oxygen. Some places to start looking are the channel off Point 2 from Diamond Bay to the Bluffs, Georges Cove, Koso Point, Dam Cove and Thumb Point. “Remember, we now in the summer period of striper fishing so you should stop releasing legal stripers caught on live bait. The slogan for the summer is ‘Grow Trophies, Catch Your Limit and Go Home.’ Catch your limit and quit for the day or change your target species. Save some fish for your next trip and watch them grow into trophies.”

Norfork Tailwater

(updated 7-11-2018) John Berry of Berry Brothers Guide Service in Cotter (870-435-2169) said that last week Norfork Lake fell 1 foot to rest at 0.4 feet below seasonal power pool of 556 feet msl and 24.4 feet below the top of flood pool. The Norfork had less generation and wadable water every day. Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are now below the top of power pool. With warmer weather and increased power demand for air conditioning, we can expect more generation in the afternoons, but there is a possibility of wadable water in the cooler mornings. The Norfork has fished well. There have been some nice midge, caddis and sulphur hatches that have provided some good top water action. Navigate this stream with caution as things have changed a bit during flooding over the past year or more. There has been major gravel recruitment at the bottom of Mill Pond and the dock hole. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (sizes 18, 20, 22) like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (sizes 14, 16) like the Green Butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double-fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead-headed nymph (zebra midge, Copper John or pheasant tail) suspended 18 inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise size 10). The fishing is better in the morning. John’s favorite rig has been a red fox squirrel nymph with a ruby midge dropper. Dry Run Creek has cleared and is fishing much better, though there are fewer fish in the creek. The hot flies have been sowbugs (size 14), Y2Ks (size 12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise size 10).

Buffalo National River/Crooked Creek

(updated 7-11-2018) vJohn Berry of Berry Brothers Guide Service in Cotter (870-435-2169) said the Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are navigable but low. The smallmouths are active. John’s favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.



NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

Beaver Lake

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 1,120.81 feet msl (normal conservation pool: 1,121.00 msl).

(updated 7-11-2018) Bailey’s Beaver Lake Guide Service (479-366-8664) says stripers are making their way north and are scattered throughout the lake. They are still using mouths of coves and tree lines adjacent to the channel. Some stripers are still making their way out of the river to the main lake. For you diehard live baiters, fishing with green lights at night and using weighted lines, balloons and downlines between about 20-40 feet deep during daylight hours should get you some stripers. For the artificial baits you can try trolling umbrella rigs with white or chartreuse jigs/grubs or plugs like Rapala No. 14 husky jerks in black back or purple back colors, and Smithwick Rogues in similar colors in the 5-6-inch model on planer boards to stagger your presentation. Downrigging said baits will be effective, too. Make sure you do not keep striper under 20 inches and not more than three striper, hybrid or combination of the two. Know your species and make sure you identify any fish you keep. There is no limit on white bass. Fish location is greatly influenced by lake level and current flow. Current in the lake from generation will generally position fish on upstream or downstream edges of structure. Check the daily lake level and flow data link on Mike Bailey’s website. Live bait as always is the go-to approach on Beaver Lake when fishing for trophy stripers. Water surface temperatures are in the mid-80s. Mike suggest checking out these hot spots in the mid- and upper sections: Beaver Lake Dam, Point 1, Lost Bridge South, Rocky Branch, Ford and Cedar creeks, Larue, Coppermine, Ventris, Shaddox Hollow. At the Highway 12 bridge and Prairie Creek,pay attention to areas around the islands and Point 10, a lot of fish are coming out of the river late due to high water.

(updated 7-11-2018) Southtown Sporting Goods (479-443-7148) said the clarity of the lake is clear and the surface water temperature is 83 degrees (as of Monday). Bream are fair on worms or crickets. There are lot of ways to get to the crappie, and reports have been good. Some anglers have been trolling. Arrive really early, or wait until just before dark, for the bass bite, which they rate as fair. Spinnerbaits, topwaters and Texas-rigged worms are working best. Catfish are good on prepared bait and live bait.

Beaver Tailwaters

(updated 7-11-2018) Guide Austin Kennedy (479-244-0039) said fishing has been spot-on this past week, and the weather over the weekend was fantastic for fishing. The trout have been hitting the PowerBaits hard. The hot spot has been between Spider Creek and U.S. Highway 62 bridge. Fishing various PowerBaits under light terminal tackle has been the best combination. The trout have also responded well to spoons of various colors in the quarter-ounce range. Smallmouths were hitting on soft plastics and hard jerkbaits fishing structure and chunk rock. Austin says, “We have some rain forecasted in the upcoming week, but it should not be enough to slow things down. Speaking of slowing things down, over the weekend there were some folks in big boats (too big for the tailwaters) who had a complete disregard for the safety of kayakers and fishermen in smaller boats. These bigger boats were speeding past the kayakers and smaller boats, causing them to be swamped. Folks, it is imperative that safe boating operations are practiced. With the conditions in the tailwaters, along with heavy boating and kayaking traffic, very serious injury or death can easily occur. I implore anyone who observes unsafe boating to report that boat to the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department and the Arkansas Fish and Game Commission. As always, were your life jacket, have fun, stay safe and catch some fish.”

(updated 7-6-2018) Beaver Dam Store said bait fisherman are catching numbers of trout using PowerBait, nightcrawlers and waxworms. The Bertrand ramp area has been fishing well. Fish upstream from Parker Bottoms in the Trophy Management Area as well as Campground C, Riverview walk-in areas as well as the turnaround. Always be attentive to rising water conditions. Nymphs and midges are working well along with white or olive PJ Jigs. Typical good lures in this area are gold and silver Colorado spoons, red and gold Bouyant Spoons and Flicker Shad in Pro Series Nos. 4 and 5. Good PowerBait colors are white, red, orange, yellow chartreuse and peach. Good flies are pheasant tails, midges in blue dun, black, olive, hare’s ear, tungsten Copper Johns, WD 40s, Trout Magnets and San Juan worms.

Lake Fayetteville

(updated 7-11-2018) Lake Fayetteville Boat Dock (479-444-3476) said the water clarity remains cloudy. The surface water temperature was deemed HOT. Water level was normal. Bream are good on worms or crickets. Crappie are fair, and anglers are trolling minnows or jigs. Bass are fair on the plastic worms and topwater plugs. Catfishing is fair; no baits were specified.

Lake Sequoyah

(updated 7-11-2018) Lake Sequoyah Boat Dock (479-444-3475) reports that the water lake is about 5 inches low and the water is clear. Surface temperature is 83 degrees as of Monday. Bream are excellent. Catch them in 4 feet of water with worms or crickets. Bass are good early in ithe day. They're hitting spinnerbaits and topwater plugs. Catfish are good on chicken livers, shad and live bait. No reports on crappie. Note: During July, the boat dock will be open all night on Friday nights.


NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

Lake Poinsett

(updated 7-11-2018) Ome Coleman at Lake Poinsett State Park said they are “missing the fisherman traffic and are anxiously looking forward to the time that Lake Poinsett is ready for you all. Meanwhile, we are keeping all you fishing needs in stock. That includes live bait and other supplies.” There are other lakes in the immediate area for anglers to check out, including Lake Hogue and Lake Charles. Also, the AGFC’s Family and Community Fishing Program is now stocking the pond at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro.

Crown Lake

(updated 7-11-2018) Boxhound Marina (870-670-4496) said the water clarity is clear. Water level is a little below normal. The surface water temperature is 90 degrees. Bream are good on worms and crickets. Nothing to report on crappie. Bass are good, but get on them early before the sun gets up or wait until late in the evening. Use topwaters. Catfishing is good with chicken livers or nightcrawlers.

Spring River

(updated 7-4-2018) Mark Crawford with springriverfliesandguides.com (870-955-8300) said water levels are running at 320 cfs and water clarity has been clear. The catching has been great early with the bite tapering off when the heat rises. Olive and black Woollies, El Diablos and Guppies have been hot. Some mornings have had good hatches and a hopper dropper with the dropper being a hare’s ear, pheasant tail or a prince working well. Hot pink and white Trout Magnets are working well. Have to fish them just off the bottom! Adjust float as depth changes.
 

(updated 7-11-2018) John Berry of Berry Brothers Guide Service in Cotter (870-435-2169) said the Spring River is navigable. This is a great place to wade fish when they are running water on the White and Norfork rivers. Canoe season is here and there are many boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive Woolly Buggers with a bit of flash (size 10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (size 10) and Y2Ks (size 10).

White River

(updated 7-4-2018) Triangle Sports (870-793-7122) said the water clarity is clear and the surface water temperature was 88 degrees. The water level is low by 8 feet. No reports on bream. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Bass are fair using spinnerbaits or plastic worms. No reports on catfish. Walleye catches were fair; use jigheads.


SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS

Arkansas River (Pool 2)

No report.

Arkansas River (Pine Bluff Pool)

No reports.

Cane Creek Lake

(updated 7-4-2018) Park Interpreter Houston Wynn at Cane Creek State Park said fishing at Cane Creek has been fairly slow, considering. The water level is low due to the hot conditions, and the bite for most fish is scarce. The bass action hasn’t been great over the past couple weeks. Any reports that have come in have said that the bite is decent in the late evening. You can find these fish chasing schools of shad in the channels along the surface. Try any bait that swims shallow and resembles shad. Crappie can be found if you can map out structure on the bottom. These fish are holding up on brush piles in deeper water. If you find them, pretty decent-sized fish are being reported. The catfish bite has been fairly consistent throughout the summer. They can be found in deeper waters during the heat of the day, and the bite turns up during the night in shallow waters. Stink baits, large minnows, cut bait or liver will work great for bait. One fish that you will not struggle to find is bream. They’re biting in full swing and can be found along the banks at all times of the day! They will bite almost anything you put in front of them.

Lake Chicot

No report.

Lake Monticello

No report.


SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

Millwood Lake

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 259.54 feet msl (normal conservation pool: 259.20 msl).

(updated 7-11-2018) Mike Siefert at Millwood Lake Guide Service said, “It’s middle of July now, and southwest Arkansas is still HOT, folks.” Millwood Lake is about 3.5 inches above normal conservation pool and steady as of Monday at 259.5 feet msl; the discharge was near 650 cfs for Little River, according to the Army Corps of Engineers The tailwater below the dam and gates as of Monday remains very low, about 225 feet msl. Water temps continued climbing over the past week. Surface temps as of Monday ranged near 86 degrees early to 94 later under full sun, depending on location. Be sure and check the most recent lake level of Millwood Lake on the guide service’s website, or at the Army Corps of Engineers website for updated gate release changes and inflow rates with rising and falling lake levels and conditions. No-wake zones are in effect at White Cliffs Campground on Little River and marked with buoys. Continue to use caution in navigation on Little River and Millwood watching for random, broken, or floating timber. Clarity and visibility continue improving over the past week, but remain stained in places, especially upriver. Mike says that all this mid-summer heat, the best bite of the day for largemouth bass continues to be from dawn to around 10 a.m.; during mid-day until dusk the bass are dropping off the flats into the depths of Little River where the thermocline resides between 12-18 feet. Largemouth bass over the past couple weeks have been good early up to 3-5 pounds on topwaters (and cloud-cover mornings are seeing best activity) early at dawn. Feeding activity levels have slowed during the heat of the day with the increase of surface temperatures in the mid to upper 80s and low 90 range over the past couple weeks. Best baits over the past couple weeks have been buzzbaits, plastic frogs and Bass Assassin Shads on a light wire hook working in new lily pad growth. Best color of frogs have been black or June Bug in new lily pads. Buzzbait colors drawing best reactions lately are Hot Firecracker Chartreuse, Cotton Candy, Bleeding Bream and black. A good spinnerbait bite is working on shallow flats early, near lily pads and vegetation like pond weed and alligator grass, randomly, near stumps and laydowns close to creek channel swings. Slow-rolling the spinnerbaits off points, ditches and creek mouths dumping into Little River from 8-12 feet will yield a few random bass. The buzzbaits are also working across flats with stumps and laydowns near creek channels, and around lily pads. StutterSteps, Cordell Crazy Shads, Arbogast Jitterbugs, Heddon Crazy Crawlers and Moss Bosses in the slop are all getting fair to good reactions from largemouths in creek channels near stumps. Topwater activity levels slow considerably after 11 a.m., with very little topwater activity until dusk. Once the topwater bite subsides, go with a big, bulky, 10-12-inch worm around stumps on points and deeper in the creeks, and on points dumping into Little River and secondary points along Little River. Berkley Power Worms and Zoom Ol’ Monster 10-12-inch worms in June-Bug/Red, Black, Blue Fleck, Red Shad and June Bug colors are drawing random reactions from largemouths along steeper vertical washouts, ledges and stairsteps along Little River and near creek mouth junctions, points and intersecting feeder creeks dumping into Little River. Vertical-jigging spoons will connect with a few Kentucky (spotted) bass and schools of largemouths in Little River behind points and washouts. Schools of Kentuckies and largemouths feeding on river shad will hit vertical-jigged spoons with abandon once the topwater bite subsides late in the morning. Mike says they have been using Cotton Cordell hammered spoons over the past week or two, with added bucktails. Some mornings a white bucktail is best, and seems like cloudy mornings that a red bucktail works better. Between Jack's Isle and Hurricane Creek along Little River, in 10-15 foot of depth where broken timber and stumps are located, you’ll find the most aggressive spoon-bass feeders. Also, the mouth of Snake Creek gave up a few spoon bass over the past week.
White bass were biting vertical-jigging 1-ounce slab spoons in Little River under the U.S. Highway 71 bridge next to bridge pilings. No reports on crappie. As for catfish, blues and channel Cats have been biting minnows and cut bait on yo-yos set around 8-10 feet deep and hung from cypress limbs in very back of Mud Lake oxbow, along Little River, over the past few weeks.
 

Lake Columbia

(updated 7-11-2018) Sportsman’s One Stop in El Dorado (870-863-7248) report that a few bass being caught. Crappie are being caught at night. No report on bream and catfish.


Lake Greeson Tailwater (Little Missouri River)
Visit www.littlemissouriflyfishing.com for a daily update on fishing conditions.

Lake Greeson

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation was 544.17 feet msl (full pool: 548.00 feet msl).

(updated 7-11-2018) Jason Lenderman with JL Guide Service (870-490-0804) said the lake level is almost 4 feet below full pool of 548 feet msl and holding pretty steady. Water temps have made it to the upper 80s. The bass have transitioned to their summertime patterns and have slowed down considerably. Super Spook Jr’s and Booyah Hard Knockers are seeing some action on main lake points early and late. Shaky head Yum finesse Worms and drop-shots rigged with Yum Kill Shots or Sharpshooters are working OK on main lake points as well. Night fishing has been decent lately using black Booyah Spinnerbaits or Yum Ribbontail worms. Crappie are slowing down, but still good. They can be caught in 15-25 foot brush with minnows.

DeGray Lake
As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation was 403.90 feet msl (flood pool: 408.00 feet msl).

(updated 7-11-2018) John Duncan of yoyoguideservice.com at Iron Mountain Marina said, “I think it is gonna get hot. Great Fourth, thanks to everyone on DeGray for being safe for the holidays.” The water level on Tuesday was 403.91 feet msl. Water temperature is in the high 80s. Water is clear throughout. The heat has really slowed down the fishing. White bass and black bass are breaking throughout the lake from Piney to Iron Mountain. They don’t stay up long. Be ready and get there early with spoons, Whopper Ploppers, Zara Spook Jrs and get them. It has been pretty windy for a while and that makes surfacing fish less likely and harder to see. Hybrids are spotty at best. Spoons still are working. You have to use your electronics to find them and then count your spoons down to that depth. They move like cattle, so stay with them. Be early! Trolling deep-diving crankbaits is a good bet after early morning. Crappie fishing is slow. Fish deep, 15 feet or more. Minnows are best. Like all of the other fish, be early. Deep brush piles around Alpine and Shouse Ford are good areas. Black bass are in their summer pattern except for the surfacing ones. No bream report. Stay hydrated and be early again.

(updated 7-11-2018) Local angler George Graves said surface water temperature is in the mid-80s and the lake is clear throughout. Overall fishing is pretty good providing you get out there early – that means even before sunup. Bass fishing is fair with quite a few small fish reported but the big ones are hard to come by. Look for surface-feeding fish in the lower end in the big coves between points 2 and 4. Also try around the state park, especially at the marina. Use most any topwater lure or soft plastics such as Zoom Flukes and 3-inch swimbaits. There’s a little activity at mid-lake between Edgewood and Caddo Drive. Try working a Texas-rigged worm across main lake points where there is some cover. Also try a medium-running crankbait in a natural shad pattern. Crappie fishing is fair with the fish holding tight to cover on attractors in 20-25 feet of water. Drop a 2-inch Kalin's Curly Gail Grub to the thickest part of the brush down about 15 feet. Tennessee Shad on a 1/16-ounce jighead is the best rig. Be sure to cover the entire attractor because the fish will be only in one spot. Once again, early morning is best. Hybrid fishing remains slow with a few fish showing in the lower end at DeRoche Ridge and the big coves between points 2 and 6. Look for surface-feeding fish and throw most any small topwater lure. When the surface activity subsides, try a jigging spoon because the fish are probably still present, just down deeper. White and chartreuse are best colors for the spoon. Lots of white bass reported coming from the same areas. In fact white bass and hybrids will schoo

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For July 2nd - July 8th

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 2, 2018 – July 8, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
July 2, 2018
Arrested was Fernando Diaz-Deleon, 36, of Cove, on two Body Attachment Warrants.
 
Report from a Vandervoort woman that her 17-year-old granddaughter had ran away. The juvenile was later located and returned to the custody of a parent/guardian.
 
Arrested was Nicole C. Renard, 38, of Mena, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.
 
Report from complainant on Polk 227 near Cove of the theft of $76.00 in cash. Investigation continues.
 
July 3, 2018
Report of an abandoned vehicle on Polk 44 near Mena, having caused damage to a fence. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Far Away Lane near Wickes of the theft of an ATV. Investigation continues.
 
Arrested was Jack A. Curry, 38, of Mena, on three Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Traffic stop on East Barton Street in Cove led to the arrest of David M. Fraser, 50, of Vandervoort, on two Warrants for Failure to Appear.
 
Report from complainant of vandalism done to a vehicle while in Mena. The investigation has been turned over to the Mena Police Department.
 
Arrested was Jeremy K. McKinney, 41, of Watson, OK, on Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order and four counts of Delivery of Meth/Cocaine.
 
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Steven R. Johnson, 28, of Dequeen, on two Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
July 4, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 46 near Shady Grove of a break-in that caused damage to a door. Investigation continues.
 
July 5, 2018
Report from a Mena woman of being threatened by an acquaintance. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainants on Polk 61 near Board Camp of damage done to several mailboxes. Investigation continues.
 
Report from a business on Highway 71 South in Cove of an attempted scam regarding the purchase of prepaid cash cards.
 
Report from complainant on Highway 246 West near Hatfield of being harassed by an acquaintance. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Report of a disturbance on Polk 189 near Mena led to the arrest of John K. Robertson, 43, of Mena, on a Charge of Battery 3rd Degree. Additional information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Report from complainant on Strider Lane near Mena of receiving a citation in the mail from another state that they had not been to. Investigation continues.
 
July 6, 2018
Report of a structure fire on Polk 97 near Acorn. Investigation continues into the origin of the fire.
 
Report from a Mena woman of inappropriate discipline concerning a juvenile. Investigation determined the incident happened in another jurisdiction. The case was forwarded to the proper authorities.
 
Report of an unauthorized person at a campground on Highway 71 South near Hatfield. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Polk 710 near Potter of a fraudulent charge on their credit card. The amount was refunded to their account.
 
Report from a business on Highway 71 South in Cove of a scam involving prepaid cash cards, totaling losses at $2,400.00. Investigation continues.
 
July 7, 2018
Traffic stop on Polk 38 near Potter led to the arrest of Charles D. Morgan, II, 41, of Mena, on Charges of DWI, Driving Left of Center and Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License. Also arrested was Julian L. Craig, 35, of Hatfield, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.
 
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Angel M. Holloway, 26, of Horatio, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Arrested was Jesse L. Zamora, 35, of Mena, on a Body Attachment Warrant.
 
July 8, 2018
Report from complainants on Polk 20 West near Cove of damage done to several mailboxes.
 
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Cove of the theft of a cell phone, valued at $500.00. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Bunyard Lane near Ink of the theft of a vehicle, tools and a safe, all valued at $1,405.00. Investigation continues.
 
Report of a structure fire on Highway 8 East near Mena.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked one vehicle accident this week. Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 28 Incarcerated Inmates, with 6 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
PC18-00438
 
7-10-18 10:08 p.m. kawx.org 
 

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"OBEY THE SIGN OR PAY THE FINE" CONCERTED STATEWIDE SPEED ENFORCEMENT PATROLS SCHEDULED

July 9, 2018
  (LITTLE ROCK) – Arkansas law enforcement officers will launch a concentrated week-long speed enforcement plan next week.  The operation will be promoted across the state using the message headline, “Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine”.
  The intensified enforcement effort will begin Monday, July 16th and continue through the following Sunday, July 22nd.  The enforcement plan involves law enforcement departments across the state
  “Speeding leads to death on our roadways,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police and the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative.  “Higher speeds reduce a driver’s ability to steer safely around other vehicles, roadway hazards and unexpected highway exits or directions."
   Drivers who ignore the speed limit put themselves, their passengers and other drivers at tremendous risk.  During calendar year 2015, speeding was a contributing factor in 27 percent of all fatal crashes in the U.S. and more than 9,500 lives were lost in such crashes, according to the latest data available from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  “Driving above the posted speed limit or speeding in bad weather conditions dramatically increases the probability that a motorist will be involved in a crash,” Colonel Bryant said.  “State troopers and other law enforcement officers will be on the lookout for speeding drivers.”
  The goal of the operation is to save lives and make drivers aware that no excuses are acceptable.  When it comes to speeding; Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.
  For more information on the “Obey the Sign, or Pay the Fine” mobilization, please visit www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov or contact the Arkansas Highway Safety Office at (501) 618-8136. For more on Arkansas’ ongoing Toward Zero Deaths campaign to eliminate preventable traffic fatalities, visit www.TZDarkansas.org.
7-9-18 1:08 p.m. kawx.org 

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Rutledge Announces #MissingPersonMondays Outreach

LITTLE ROCK – Attorney General Leslie Rutledge announced the launch of #MissingPersonMondays in coordination with stakeholders and law enforcement agencies from throughout Arkansas. The social media campaign will highlight one individual listed on the NeverForgotten.ar.gov site every Monday throughout the year using various social media platforms.

 

“Missing Person Mondays is a direct result of last year’s Never Forgotten event,” said Attorney General Rutledge. “Last year, I hosted a listening session for families of missing persons to provide input and guidance on how the law enforcement community could better work with families as they deal with the difficult and emotional process of searching for their loved ones. In collaboration with many stakeholders, this social media campaign will uniformly highlight one missing person every Monday and drive traffic to the NeverForgotten.ar.gov site, where there are over 500 of our state’s missing persons listed. I strongly believe that someone, somewhere knows something about each of these missing persons cases, and this is just one of many ways we can shine light on these cases to bring information and hope to the families and law enforcement.”

 

Each weekly announcement will be posted on the Arkansas Attorney General’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages, in addition to each of the stakeholder sites. The post will include a photograph of the missing person, the date they went missing, place last seen and the social media handle for the law enforcement agencies investigating the case. To launch the program, Anthony (Tony) Allen, the longest listed missing person from Arkansas, will be the first featured by the program and the following weeks will include other individuals in chronological order by date last seen.

 

In addition to the Attorney General’s Office, committee stakeholders include: Arkansas Crime Information Center, Arkansas Governor’s Office, Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy, Arkansas State Crime Lab, Arkansas State Police, Criminal Justice Institute, FBI, Morgan Nick Foundation, NamUs, David Clark and Henry La Mar.

 

For more information on missing persons in Arkansas, please visit NeverForgotten.ar.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7-9-18 10:19 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Mena Police Department Reports for days of June 30, 2018 through July 7

Mena Police Department Reports for days of June 30, 2018 through July 7, 2018 follows:
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
A local landlord reported that a former tenant had taken several items from his property.  Case is under investigation.
 
A Mena man reported the theft of a tiller from his carport.  Case is pending.
 
Ina Elizabeth Lewis, 31, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to pay fines and court costs. She was taken into custody in Pike County, and Mena city officers drove there to bring her to Polk County.
 
July 1, 2018
 
A Mena woman reported that several items had been stolen from her residence. Case is pending location of suspect.
 
July 2, 2018
 
Report was taken of a counterfeit $100.00 bill being taken at a local convenience store.  Case pending.
 
Three separate reports were taken of individuals being harassed by various people.  Cases are pending.
 
Hailey Breseman, 21, of Hatfield was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
July 3, 2018
 
A Polk County woman reported that her former boyfriend has been harassing her at her place of employment.  Case pending.
 
A local man reported that his wallet had been stolen from a local business.  Case is pending review of surveillance tapes and identity and interview of any suspects.
 
Jeffery McAllister, 49, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.
 
July 4, 2018
 
A local woman made a report regarding interference with child custody.  Case pending.
 
July 5, 2018
 
Michael Wayne Creel, 31, of Mena was charged with DWI, driving on a suspended license, and careless driving.  The arrest after officers responded to a call regarding a car in a ditch.
 
July 6 & 7, 2018
 
Report was made of an altercation between a woman and her son.  Case is pending.
 
Report was taken of an attempted theft of a bicycle.  Case is pending further investigation.
 
It was reported that a woman had become agitated while in a local office and was causing a disturbance.  No charges have been filed at this time.
 
7-9-18 8:46 a.m. kawx.org
 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address-The First Report of the School Safety Commission

 
LITTLE ROCK – After four months of study and travel to schools all over the state, the Arkansas School Safety Commission has released its preliminary report with 19 recommendations for improving security at our public schools.
 
I created the commission in March, two weeks after the mass killing at the high school in Parkland, Florida, and asked to see the initial report the first week of July so that we would have time to consider the commission’s findings before school starts in the fall. The commission will submit its final report on November 30, in time to prepare for next session of the General Assembly.
The commission produced a thorough report that gives us plenty to consider.
 
Of all that we can do to protect our children in school, the most significant thing we can do, which perhaps is also the most difficult, is to notice those often silent pleas for help or warning signs that a teen is troubled. In many of the recent shootings at schools, investigators discovered that suspects had displayed symptoms of mental-health issues or a potential for violence. Counselors and teachers either failed to notice or didn’t know how to proceed if they did.
 
In Arkansas, we have addressed the role of school counselors, but it is time to revisit and update. The Public School Student Services Act, passed in 1991, requires school counselors to spend at least 75 percent of their time at work in direct counseling and no more than 25 percent of their time on administrative duties.
 
Our counselors are having to spend too much time on paperwork rather than counseling. With proper training and sufficient time, counselors are more likely to pick up on signs of trouble and intervene before a crisis.
 
We must make mental-health counselors more readily available to students. We must have threat-assessment teams that coordinate with counselors when a student’s behavior suggests a potential for violence.
 
Based on the recommendations of the School Safety Commission, I’m directing Johnny Key, Commissioner of the Department of Education, to review that 1991 law and to work with members of the General Assembly to increase mental-health services for our students.
 
Some of the commission’s other important recommendations include (having) an armed resource officer on each campus at all times. When that is not possible, we must give schools the option of using an armed staff person who has trained for this role.
 
I do want to emphasize that no teacher or member of a school staff will ever be required to carry a firearm.
 
Another idea is to provide space for local law-enforcement officers to perform some of their official work on school grounds in order to have a police presence on campus.
Another suggestion is to establish a process for anonymous reporting of potential threats.
 
And each school district should conduct a security assessment at least every three years.
 
The Commission still has much work to do to meet the November 30 deadline, and I am grateful for all the time and energy the members have sacrificed already. Their first report is a solid foundation, and I am eager to see the final report so that we can move quickly to shore up security at our schools.
 
7-8-18 5:43 p.m. kawx.org 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column-Providing the Best Constituent Service in Congress

Providing the Best Constituent Service in Congress

 

Patty Bateman’s husband, Richard, served in the Vietnam War. She has seen the pain he carried home from the war and has fought with him to navigate the Department of Veterans Affairs to get the benefits he earned. When they ran into hurdles getting care and benefits, the Batemans called my office for assistance.

 

The Batemans are one of the thousands of Arkansas families who have reached out to my office for help navigating the federal bureaucracy and resolving issues with government agencies. We do our best to get answers, find solutions or just cut through the red tape that Arkansans face.

 

One of the mottos I live by as an elected official is “to use the power of the office for good.” I’ve used this phrase to help foster a culture among my staff about the importance of serving Arkansans and being a resource for constituents who need assistance.

 

As a public servant, I aim to achieve the standard set by longtime Arkansas Congressman John Paul Hammerschmidt who consistently managed to help an enormous number of people when they encountered problems involving the federal government. It’s an honor and privilege to carry on this legacy of service and I’m proud of the work my staff and I do to help Arkansans who have run into roadblocks with government agencies. 

 

For these efforts, the Congressional Management Foundation (CMF) recently recognized the work my office does providing the best constituent service in Congress. CMF awarded my team and I with its Democracy Award in the Constituent Service category based on our consistent record of helping Natural State residents. My staff and I are proud of this recognition and pleased to offer unmatched assistance to Arkansans who reach out for help.

 

CMF President and CEO Bradford Fitch called the office a “model” for my fellow members of Congress and applauded our work to “restore trust and faith that our democratic institutions can work.”

 

Helping Natural State residents is one of my most important responsibilities. It doesn’t matter where you’re from or what candidate or party you vote for – we’re here to help you however we can.

 

There are a lot of ways to reach my office so I can help. You can visit our updated website at www.boozman.senate.gov that we designed to make it easier to submit requests for assistance via mobile devices and keep Arkansans updated about the work we’re doing for you.

 

Constituent service often gets little attention, but it makes a real difference in the lives of people across the state – just like the Batemans. Please don’t hesitate to reach out so we can help you.

 

7-6-18 4:43 p.m.

 

7-6-18 4:49 p.m. kawx.org

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