KAWX News Archives for 2018-08

State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Arkansas has a great deal to celebrate this Labor Day.  Our unemployment level now stands at 3.7%.  The national level is 3.9%. The state’s unemployment rate has been at or below 4% since March of this year.

 

Every year, the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services issues the Arkansas Labor Market and Economic Report.  This report not only tells us what industries are growing or decreasing, it also projects what our labor market will look like in the coming years.

 

All major occupational groups are estimated to see net gains in employment. Food preparation and serving workers, including fast food, is predicted to lead the state in net growth with new jobs. Other top growing industries include forging and stamping, education, and health services. Service unit operators, oil, gas, and mining are occupations projected to see a decrease. 

 

When it comes to the highest paid professions in our state, internal medical physicians topped the list with an annual average salary of $266,980. Surgeons ranked second on the list. The top 5 highest paying occupations also include orthodontists, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists.

 

Retail salespersons is the category estimated to have the most employees across the state with more than 37,000. Cashiers is the second largest occupation with more than 34,000 Arkansans.

 

The average wages of the top 5 largest occupations in Arkansas are as follows:

 

Retail salesperson                $24,640

Cashiers                               $19,540

Truck Drivers                        $39,430

Food Prep/Serving Workers $18,820

Office Clerks                         $26,380

 

The report also indicates that occupations for every level of education is projected to see growth. Educational attainment of the state’s population aged 25 years and over shows that 84.7 percent have earned at least a high school diploma or equivalent. 

 

There are more than 1.3 million Arkansans who make up our workforce.  Working Arkansans are the foundation of our state’s success.  We thank you for your hard work and hope you enjoy a well-deserved holiday.

 

8-31-18 4:21 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson Weekly Radio Address: Eliminating Unnecessary Rules and Regulations


LITTLE ROCK – Bills and laws that our legislators pass are assigned a number, which tells you nothing about the subject of the law. 
 
But sometimes when legislation moves through the general assembly, it will pick up a nickname that describes its purpose.
 
The tradition of nicknames is a helpful shorthand for voters who try to keep track of legislation.
 
In keeping with that tradition, maybe we should call Act 781 of 2017 The Housecleaning Bill.
 
The Act, which I enthusiastically supported and signed into law, requires my directors in each state agency to inventory every rule and to get rid of all unnecessary rules that are outdated and serve no useful purpose.
 
To use a budgeting term, think of it as a line-item examination of state rules and regulations.
 
Basically, Act 781, sponsored by Representative Jim Dotson, requires agencies to sort through all their rules and to get rid of all unnecessary rules that are outdated and serve no purpose. Under The Housecleaning Bill, December 1 of last year was the deadline for each agency to file a preliminary report; and July 1 of this year was the deadline for the final list. All of my agency directors met that deadline.
 
This week, various legislative committees have been meeting with agency representatives, whose task was to defend the decision about every rule.
 
When you consider that we have nearly 3,400 rules and regulations in place, some of them dating back a hundred years, you understand that this housecleaning was long overdue.
 
Our agency directors recommended repeal of 830 outdated and unnecessary rules and regulations. In other words, 25 percent of all of our rules have been eliminated.
 
This has been a lot of work for our agencies, and much work lies ahead for our legislators. But when the work is done, our house will be cleaner, our government leaner.
 
8-31-18 2:17 p.m. kawx.org 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Update from the Southwest Border

 

Our country’s porous southwest border is a national security liability. It leaves us vulnerable to threats from avowed enemies who seek to harm us at home and is easily exploited by drug smugglers and human traffickers.

 

The severity of the crisis at the border calls for a serious legislative solution. In order for that response to be effective, it must be based off an understanding of the challenges we face along the border and include input from those on the ground who are responsible for protecting and securing it.

 

That’s why I recently traveled with Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), chair of the Senate Appropriations Homeland Security Subcommittee, to several sites along the Pacific coast and U.S.-Mexico border. Getting a first-hand view of the challenges that we face in controlling illegal immigration, human trafficking and drug smuggling will help us create and promote policies and provide resources to fight these crimes.

 

Our Border Patrol and air interdiction agents, ICE officers, field operations officers and Coast Guard men and women are on the frontline of this battle. During our visit, we were accompanied by U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Commandant Admiral Karl L. Schultz—as well as Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) personnel—who all helped shine a light on the security strategies that are working.

 

Over the course of three days, we participated in river patrols, toured processing and detention centers, learned about the USCG’s off-shore interdiction capabilities and more. It was a very insightful look into the ever-evolving and often dangerous challenges presented to those working to secure our borders and protect our waterways.

 

The need for more infrastructure—including roads for access, electronic devices for surveillance and fencing for deterrence—was a common refrain at each border stop. Crossings are down significantly in the areas where we have good infrastructure in place. However, the areas along the border most highly traveled by drug smugglers and human traffickers are the very same areas where our infrastructure is lacking. 

 

We are working in Washington to make resources available to build that infrastructure. Earlier this year, I supported the bipartisan Homeland Security subcommittee funding bill which included an increase in funding to better meet these needs. Constructing a wall where feasible, and coupling that with fencing, manpower and electronic surveillance, will provide a strong deterrent to those who seek to illegally enter our country. 

 

Along with a renewed commitment to border security, Congress must work to expedite the legal proceedings for those accused of entering the U.S. illegally. The agents at the processing and detention centers we visited are working very hard to ensure those apprehended or who voluntarily surrender to authorities are treated in a dignified, humane manner. It’s important for the system to work fairly and efficiently, which is why a significant increase in judges is necessary to tackle the backlog of 750,000 cases that remain to be adjudicated.

 

The men and women working on the front lines of the fight to secure our borders are handling a very difficult situation in a manner in which all Americans can be proud. Congress needs to give them all the resources they need to safely execute their mission. That must remain a top priority for lawmakers in Washington; it certainly is for me.

 

8-31-18 1:31 p.m. kawx.org 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: The IRS Scam Picks Up Speed Again

 

LITTLE ROCK – Scammers are dusting off the IRS scam and intimidating Arkansans once again by trying to convince innocent consumers that they owe back taxes that must be paid immediately. Consumers have recently been contacting the Attorney General’s office reporting that the scammers are spoofing phone numbers and posing as the IRS.
 
“Scammers continually use new strategies to frighten Arkansans,” said Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “There are various versions of this scam. Consumers should know that the IRS may send multiple letters, but will never make threatening phone calls.”
 
The IRS continues to remind consumers that these scam calls are recognizable and that the agency will not do the following:

 

  • Call demanding immediate payment. The IRS will not call if taxes are owed without first sending a bill in the mail.
  • Demand that taxes are paid without providing the individual the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.
  • Require a specific form of tax payment. For example, the IRS will not demand payment by prepaid debit card.
  • Ask consumers for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in police or other agencies to make an arrest for not paying taxes.

 

The IRS encourages Arkansans to not to give out personal information during any unsolicited phone call from the IRS and to hang up immediately, contact the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at (800) 366-4484 to report the call and file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. The agency also requests that any scam emails be forwarded to phishing@irs.gov.
 
The IRS encourages Arkansans with any questions about owed taxes to contact their office directly at (800) 829-1040.


For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-31-18 9:48 a.m. kawx.org 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

 

LITTLE ROCK – The state Constitution was adopted in 1874, but since then it has been amended 98 times.

 

Arkansas is one of 18 states that allow citizens to amend the constitution through a process that requires approval of the ballot title of the proposed amendment, followed by gathering signatures to have proposed amendments placed on the ballot. An amendment becomes part of the Constitution if voters approve it in a statewide election.

 

This year, two citizens’ groups have gained approval of ballot titles from the state attorney general’s office, and have turned in signatures to have proposed amendments placed on the November ballot. However, state officials are still verifying the signatures submitted with one of the proposals, to make sure that there are enough signatures of registered voters.

 

Also, a third group has turned in enough signatures to have an initiated act placed on the November ballot. Even though both must be approved by voters to take effect, there is a significant difference between a constitutional amendment and an initiated act. The difference is in how they can be altered in the future.

 

After an amendment is approved by voters, it becomes part of the Constitution and the only way to change it would be for voters to approve a new amendment in a future statewide election. Examples are the several amendments that have changed and updated the state’s authority to issue revenue bonds and economic development bonds. Over the years, voters have approved amendments 62, 65, 78, 89, 90 and 97 to change the government’s authority to incur debt.

 

A simpler example would be the evolution of how libraries are funded. Amendment 72, adopted by voters in 1992, is known as the city and county library amendment. It changed amendments 30 and 38, two previous measures that authorized local taxes for libraries.

 

An initiated act does not become part of the Constitution. It can be amended, meaning that its provisions may be changed, by the legislature. It can even be repealed by the legislature.

 

Any change to an initiated act requires an extraordinary majority of 67 percent of legislators. An example is the act approved by voters in 1990 that created the state Ethics Commission.

 

Over time, the Ethics Commission’s jurisdiction over campaign finance laws has steadily grown, due to passage of new laws by the legislature. For example, the legislature approved Act 1287 of 2015 to add new definitions of conflict of interest that state officials must avoid. The act empowers the Ethics Commission to regulate and enforce the laws on conflicts of interest.

 

Between now and November, the ballot issues may be stricken because of legal challenges filed by opponents. If they remain on the ballot, there will be two proposed amendments and one proposed initiated act. The act would increase the minimum wage. One proposed amendment would allow casino gambling and the other would limit the number of terms that a legislator could serve.

 

State officials are still verifying the signatures submitted by supporters of the casino amendment.

 

In addition to the three proposals submitted by citizens’ groups, there will be two proposed amendments referred by the legislature. One would require voters to present a photo ID in order to cast a ballot, the other would limit punitive damages and attorneys’ fees in civil lawsuits.

 

8-31-18 9:31 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Arkansas Highway Commission Releases Statement Regarding the Proposed Casino Gambling Amendment

 

LITTLE ROCK (8-29) – A proposed Constitutional amendment regarding casino gambling in Arkansas is currently in the process of obtaining certification that would allow it to appear on the ballot in the November 2018 general election. The proposed amendment would allow additional casinos to be opened in Arkansas.

 

The Highway Commission has no position on gambling in Arkansas – that is up to the people to decide should the issue be certified for the ballot. However, the Commission believes the citizens need to have a clear understanding of the proposal. Specifically, citizens need to understand that the proposal does not direct any of the revenue to be generated from the casinos to our state’s highways, despite what some of the promotional ads are implying.

 

This proposal is being promoted by a group calling itself Driving Arkansas Forward. They continue to use language and promotional materials that are leading people to believe that the proposed amendment would provide much needed new funding for our state’s highways. That is simply not the case. Of the tax revenue estimated to be generated from the casinos, more than half (55%) is being directed to the state’s General Fund. None is being directed to the state’s highway fund.

 

Again, the Highway Commission has no position on gambling in Arkansas. But the citizens who will decide need to make their decision based on facts. The fact is, the proposed Constitutional amendment regarding casino gambling is not a highway funding proposal.

 

8-29-18 3:41 p.m. kawx.org

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 29, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-29-18 3:33 p.m. kawx.org

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CORPS REOPENS SWIM BEACHES ON CORPS ON DIERKS, DEQUEEN, GILLHAM LAKES

 

ASHDOWN, Ark. - The Corps of Engineers, Millwood Project Office announces that Blue Ridge and Jefferson Ridge Park West Swim Beach on Dierks Lake, Coon Creek Swim Beach on Gillham Lake and Story Creek Swim Beach on DeQueen Lake have been retested and officials have determined that it is safe for public use. 


Two acceptable water samples from each beach are required by the Health Department prior to reopening a swim beach. The swim beach was temporarily closed because of higher than acceptable E. coli levels that were found during routine testing conducted by the Arkansas Department of Health.  


For more information call the Millwood Tri-Lakes Project Office at 870-898-3343, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Recreation information can be found on the Internet at www.swl.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/littlerockusace, and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/usacelittlerock.   

 

8-29-18 3:21 p.m. kawx.org

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HAVE FUN BUT BE SAFE DURING LABOR DAY WEEKEND, DON'T BE NUMBER 23

 

Labor Day weekend for many families means one last outing at the lake.  Army Corps of Engineers officials urge people to have fun, but be safe and courteous.  


Twenty-two people have died from accidents in Little Rock District waters since October.  They ranged in age from 1 to 73.  No one is immune.  Don’t be number 23.  Follow these simple but crucial rules. 

When swimming:  


* Don’t drink alcohol if you plan to be in or on the water. 
* Never rely on toys to stay afloat.
* Don’t take chances by overestimating your swimming skills. 
* Swim only in designated areas. 
* Never swim alone. 
* Watch your children at all times. 
* Diving into lakes and rivers can be dangerous.  Paralyzing injuries or death too often result.  If you do dive, first be sure there are no hidden underwater obstacles.

When boating: 


* Wear a life jacket, and don't drink alcohol and drive the boat.
* Use your kill switch.
* Follow the navigation rules of the road, buoys and other aids to navigation. 
* Always post a sharp lookout.
* Carry a navigation chart and know your waterway. 
* Before setting out, take a safe boating course.
* Check the weather forecast. 
* File a float plan with a friend. 
* Check your boat for required safety equipment and use it. 
* Know your state boating laws.

 

8-29-18 7:55 a.m. kawx.org

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Hunter Education Class To Be Offered In Mena, Registration Link In Article

 

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission will have a Hunter Education Class in Mena on September 10th, 11th, and 12th from 5:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the first two nights and 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. on the last night. The class will be held at UARM, 1100 College Drive, in Room 107 (Maddox Building), and the instructor will be Tims Edwards. 

 

Anyone born after 1968 must complete a hunter education course and carry a valid hunter education card to hunt in Arkansas. Children under 16 may hunt without hunter education as long as they are under the direct supervision of an adult who is 21 years old and has a valid hunting license. There is no specific age requirement to enroll in hunter education. However, the educational material is based on a sixth-grade reading level. Arkansas recognizes hunter education cards from other states. Arkansas’s hunter education program is recognized in all states, as well as in Canada and Mexico.

 

To register for the class in Mena, click anywhere on this line.

 

For more about Hunter Education in Arkasnas, click here.

 

8-27-18 5:33 p.m. kawx.org

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Presidential Proclamation on the Death of Senator John Sidney McCain III, Flags To Half Staff

 
As a mark of respect for the memory and longstanding service of Senator John Sidney McCain III, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, on the day of interment.  I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same period at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-third.

 

DONALD J. TRUMP
 
* Senator McCain will be laid to rest Sunday September 2, 2018 at the cemetery of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.
 
8-27-18 4:40 p.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For August 20th - 26th

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of August 20, 2018 – August 26, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the
cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they
have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
August 20, 2018
Traffic stop on Highway 71 South in Cove led to the arrest of Ricky T. Robinson, 29, of Oden, on Charges of Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Defective Equipment, a Body Attachment Warrant and a Pike County Warrant.
 
Report of an unattended death on Polk 74 near Mena. Deputies responded.
 
Report from complainant on Polk 412 near Potter of the break-in and theft of several household items, musical items, radios, cash and coins, tools, and a firearm and accessories. Investigation
continues.
 
Arrested was Daniel A. Chaney, 22, of Mena, on Warrants for Battery 3 rd Degree and two counts of Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Rebecca L. Hamilton, 34, of Cove, on a Charge of Possession of a Controlled Substance.
 
Arrested was Shannon L. McCormick, 46, of Vandervoort, on a Warrant for Possession of Meth/Cocaine.
 
Arrested was Allen D. Phillips, 49, of Mena, on a Warrant for Theft of Property and Commercial Burglary.
 
August 21, 2018
Report from Mena Regional Health System of an accidental gun shot victim. Deputies responded. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Strawberry Lane near Hatfield of the violation of an Order of Protection. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further
consideration.
 
Arrested was Adam W. Smith, 32, of Cove, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Arrested by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and the Drug Task Force was James E. Pike, 64, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of Meth/Cocaine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia,
Simultaneous Possession of Drugs & Firearms, Maintaining a Drug Premise and Forgery 1st Degree.
 
August 22, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 189 near Mena of the break-in and theft of electronics and antiques. Investigation continues.
 
Report from complainant on Rushing Lane near Mena of two vehicles that were on fire. Deputy responded.
 
Arrested was Jessica R. McDonald, 18, of Heavener, OK, on a Warrant for Interference with Custody.
 
Arrested was Betty S. Diedrich, 67, of Heavener, OK, on a Warrant for Interference with Custody.
 
August 23, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 72 near Yocana of the break-in and theft of tool boxes and several tools. Investigation continues.
 
August 24, 2018
Report of a disturbance on Polk 46 near Potter. Deputies responded. Investigation continues. Arrested was Oscar P. Garcia, 38, of Wickes, on Charges of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s
License and Faulty Equipment.
 
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Jeffery M. Crane, 22, of Cove, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 25, 2018
Report from complainant on Heritage Lane near Hatfield of the theft of four security cameras, all valued at $135.00. Investigation continues.
 
August 26, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Cove of an unauthorized person on their property. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Arrested was Dana M. Anderson, 58, of Spokane, WA, on a Warrant for Littering.
 
Arrested was Rosie R. Arthur, 44, of Cove, on a Warrant for Theft of Property and Fraudulent Use of a Credit Card.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked two vehicle accidents this week. Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 19 Incarcerated Inmates, with 10 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00567
 
8-27-18 3:21 p.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Police Department Reports For August 19, 2018 through August 25, 2018

 
 
August 19, 2018
 
Linda F. Stuart, 55, and Harvey L. Stuart, 57, both of Boles, were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.
 
Report was made of an altercation between two men at a local residence.  Officers responded, but no arrests were made.  Neither individual wished to press charges.
 
Angelica Cabello, 28, and Nathan Gastineau, 36, both of Mena, were cited for theft of property (shoplifting) after a call to a local retail store.
 
Matthew Morrison, 28, of Hope, was arrested and charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after employees at a local retail store contacted authorities.
 
August 20, 2018
 
Edward Huber, 58, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding felony warrant from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.
 
August 21, 2018
 
David S. Green, 41, of Mena was served two outstanding warrants from the Polk County Sheriff and Mena Police.
 
Kristine Wootton, 34, of Mena was charged with arrested and charged with disorderly conduct after officers responded to a call regarding a woman approaching people and asking for money as they exited a business.
 
David Sinyard, 42, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant for failure to appear from the Mena Police.
 
Bobby Huber, 25, of Mena was arrested on a warrant from Mena Police for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
August 22, 2018
 
Report was made by a property owner of someone possibly living in a house that is supposed to be vacant.  Case is pending.
 
August 23, 2018
 
Officers responded to two separate incidents involving issues between individuals.  No charges were filed in either case.
 
August 24 & 25, 2018
 
Robert Castillo, 49, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.
 
Patrick John Bates, 45, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police.
 
8-27-18 9:25 a.m. kawx.org 
 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Google Tracking Locations

Simply turning off the Location History for Google accounts does not stop the tech company from tracking a user’s location. According to an investigation published this week by the Associated Press, Google can track time-stamped location data from devices when the maps feature, browser or even the weather app is opened. But there is a way to stop the company from tracking locations.
 
“Google is a popular web browser and email provider across the country,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “While we often expect privacy from these companies, in reality we must take extra steps to turn off location functions to prevent the company from peering into our daily schedules.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following information about Google’s location tracking:

 

  • Location tracking is necessary to use some phone apps such as Google Maps.
  • Location tracking can be helpful when searching for information like the weather, shopping, restaurants and lodging.
  • For most apps, location setting options such as “always,” “while using the app” or “never” are available.  An explanation of these terms can be found in the app settings.
  • Changes need to be made to the Google account to turn off location tracking.
  • To turn off location tracking, Google users can open the account, access account information from the drop down menu at the top right corner. iPhone users may click on Personal Info & Privacy, go to My Activity, open Activity Controls and turn off the toggle at Web & App Activity. (Android users can find this under Data & Personalization.)

 

For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-27-18 8:30 a.m. kawx.org

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US, Arkansas Flags Should Be Lowered To Half-Staff In Tribute To The Memory Of Senator John McCain

The United States flag and the state flag of Arkansas are hereby lowered to half-staff in tribute to the memory of Arizona Senator John McCain. Flags will remain at half-staff until sunset on the day of interment.

 

Governor Asa Hutchinson released the following statement:

 

"John McCain reflected in every breath of his life the American character and American idealism. As a war hero, a political maverick and leader he personified sacrifice and courage. I witnessed his strength of character both in Congress and as a campaigner. We will miss him."

 

8-26-18 6:05 p.m. kawx.org 

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Weekly Fishing Report

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 22, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas (this report not available this week)

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

8-25-18 1:27 p.m. kawx.org 

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AGFC Accepting Applications For Wildlife Officers

LITTLE ROCK – Looking for the opportunity to work in specialized fields of law enforcement and have the outdoors as your office? The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission could be just the place for you.

 

The AGFC is taking applications for its next class of wildlife officer cadets. Applications will be accepted until Sept. 7, 2018. 

 

Becoming a wildlife officer is much more than just checking hunting and fishing licenses. Wildlife officers are the face of the AGFC in many communities. They respond to calls for help during natural disasters, search-and-rescue efforts and even assist other agencies in manhunts, drug enforcement and other high-profile law enforcement activities. Top that off with their undying devotion to teaching the next generation about the wonders of the outdoors and passing on our hunting heritage and you begin to see exactly what today’s wildlife officer looks like.

 

“People usually just think of wildlife officers as men and women writing citations for wildlife violations or trying to catch someone over the limit on fish,” said Maj. Jason Parker, assistant chief of the AGFC’s Enforcement Division. “Sure we do that, but there’s so much more to the job. Today’s wildlife officer has full police power and is often called on to assist many other law enforcement agencies as well as the many other divisions of the AGFC.”

 

Parker says competition is strong for these jobs, and he’s always impressed with the caliber of applicants. 

 

“We have state troopers, former Sheriffs, military police and many other law enforcement professionals apply to be a part of our family,” Parker said. “But I understand why. I can’t think of another job more fulfilling than ensuring that our natural resources and traditions of outdoors enjoyment continue long into the future.” 

 

Visit https://jobs.agfc.com/ for a list of requirements, preferred skills and abilities and an electronic application form.

 

8-25-18 1:22 p.m. kawx.org 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Student Loan Forgiveness Scams

Many college students take out loans to help pay for higher education, but scammers prey on those in debt with student loan forgiveness “programs.” Scammers will pose as government agencies offering to help with complicated federal student loan debt or claim to be independent organizations that are aware of new changes in repayment programs. But offers that do not come from an assigned federal loan servicer are a scam.
 
“Student loan debt can be intimidating,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “Con artists often make unrealistic promises, such as drastically reducing or doing away with monthly payments altogether. While this may seem attractive at first, it can be detrimental in the long run, accumulating interest and potentially sliding into default. Some of these scammers will even charge for their assistance.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following red flags of a student loan forgiveness scam:

  • Borrowers are instructed to stop paying on the loans
  • Borrowers are offered a promise of guaranteed reduced payments and/or loan forgiveness
  • The scammer requests Federal Student Aid username or passwords (FSA ID)
  • Borrowers are instructed to ignore letters or emails from a federal loan servicer
  • The scammer stressed the difficulty for the average person to navigate the Federal Student Aid system

If Arkansans believe they have been a victim of one of these companies, they should contact the federal loan service and update account information by changing all passwords and cancel any automatic withdrawal payments.
 
Financial aid basics and student loan repayment questions can be answered at StudentLoans.gov. The National Student Loan Data System is the Department of Education’s central database and has information for the specific federal loan servicer assigned to collect student loan payments.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-25-18 1:11 p.m. kawx.org 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

During the next two weeks, the legislature will be meeting in committees to review hundreds of rules from state agencies, commissions, and constitutional offices.

 

Often times after the legislature passes a law, agencies must make rules to determine how those laws will be carried out or enforced.

 

The procedures that agencies follow is typically known as the “rule making process.”  It is designed to ensure the public has an opportunity to review and comment before it is adopted.

 

Rules flesh out details not written in legislation but are needed to administer a program.

 

For example, in 2013 the General Assembly passed a law allowing certain counties to establish a vote center which would allow voters from any precinct to cast a ballot at that center on Election Day.  To ensure the law is correctly applied, the Secretary of State’s Office drafted rules that established standards for the maintenance and testing of equipment.  The office also needed to establish procedures for vote centers to follow if the electronic system failed.

 

With more than a thousand laws passed every session, some rules become outdated over time.  That is why during the last session we passed Act 781.  This allows agencies to present rules they wish to repeal before legislative committees.  Agencies will also present a list of rules that will continue to be enforced.

 

The committees will then make recommendations to Legislative Council which will meet before the end of the year to vote on the changes.

 

These meetings will begin August 27 and continue through September 7.  We will not be meeting on Labor Day.

 

More than 100 agencies are scheduled to present their rules.

 

On our website you will find a list of the daily schedule and the rules that will be presented to the committees on that day.  Visit www.arkansashouse.org

 

8-24-18 5:59 p.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Quorum Court To Meet August 28th

 

The Polk County Quorum Court will meet Tuesday, August 28th, at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Quorum Court Board Room of the Polk County Office Complex (old hospital) on Pine Street in Mena.

 

On the agenda is an ordinance to adopt an interlocal agreement between the cities and counties in the Sebastian County Mental Health Catchment Area concerning the operations of the Sebastian County regional Crisis Stabilization Unit which serves a five county area, including Polk County.

 

There is also rountine business for the court to deal with.

 

The meeting is open to the public as required by law. Anyone may attend.

 

8-24-18 3:13 p.m. kawx.org

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Arkansans at the White House: A Dialogue with the Administration

 

No matter where they call home, there is one thing leaders across Arkansas share in common – wanting to help our state and its citizens. As I travel around the state, I hear many of the same issues and concerns from community leaders who are finding solutions to problems and laying the groundwork for future development. Resources for improvements to roads, bridges, railways and water infrastructure are key components to economic growth. These are common themes in every corner of our state. Arkansans recently traveled to Washington to deliver that message directly to the Trump administration.

 

The White House invited community leaders from across the state to talk about issues important to Arkansas. It’s great to see this outreach by the White House to connect with local leaders who provide the essential services we all rely on from education, roads and utilities. Making this connection helps develop relationships with federal agencies and advance shared priorities. The meeting is part of a two-year initiative to welcome elected officials and community leaders from each state for a personalized briefing with federal officials. 

 

As infrastructure is an issue that I often hear about from Arkansans, I’m pleased that this topic was a focus of discussions. Administration officials also talked about workforce development, trade policies and agriculture. Together with Congress, we have made progress on these issues.

 

This summer, Congress passed, and the president reauthorized legislation to support workforce development and train students and workers to learn technical skills to meet the needs of 21st century jobs. We are making progress on important infrastructure priorities like the America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 while also funding important infrastructure needs through the appropriations process. The Senate and the House of Representatives each passed a version of the Farm Bill. Now, I’m working with my colleagues to create a bill that will provide Arkansas farmers and ranchers with the certainty and predictability they need to feed and clothe the world.

 

Agriculture is our state’s largest industry, which makes it important for Arkansans to have an opportunity to share their ideas with U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. The secretary spoke about his support for rural communities including policies like the Farm Bill, trade and expanded broadband access.

 

Closing the rural broadband gap has been a priority for me. That’s why I helped launch the Senate Broadband Caucus. Working together at the local, state and federal level, we can improve access to broadband. This connectivity is just as essential today as having roads and bridges. I’m pleased the administration is joining us to accomplish this.

 

While I was able to participate in the forum at the White House, I visited with many of the elected leaders in advance of their meeting and visited with them after the discussion. It’s always great having friendly Arkansans in Washington.

 

Launching a dialogue between community leaders and the administration develops a working relationship with federal agencies and offers another voice to share the priorities of our state. Having the support of the administration will go a long way to achieve our goals.

 

8-24-18 2:45 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address Reminder: Flashing Red Means Kids Ahead

 
LITTLE ROCK – The protection of our children from armed attackers at school has been a matter of great concern this year. Fortunately, those events are rare, and the work of the Arkansas School Safety Commission will further reduce the risk.
 
But our students who ride a bus to school face danger every day from drivers who ignore the flashing red lights on a bus that has stopped to allow students on or off.
 
The Arkansas Department of Education has made great effort to educate drivers that state law requires all drivers to stop for a stopped school bus. In spite of that effort, a one-day survey of school bus drivers indicates the number of violators increased by more than 100 this year over last. And this year’s total is 250 more than three years ago when bus drivers reported over 600 violations.
 
Bus drivers reported over 850 violations on April 24, the day the Department of Education took this year’s survey.
 
Jerry Owens is the senior transportation manager in the Department of Education. He said the results from this year’s survey “are alarming. One incident is one too many.”
 
In its ongoing effort to drive the message home, the education department once again is promoting the “Flashing Red. Kids Ahead” campaign. Approximately 350,000 young Arkansans board one of about 7,000 school buses every day. That’s a lot of possibility for injury.
 
Leaders in our state take the issue seriously. In 2005, the General Assembly passed a bill known as “Isaac’s Law.” This law greatly increased the penalties for passing a stopped school bus.
Legislators passed the law after a driver illegally passed a bus and killed 9-year-old Isaac Brian.
 
Kimberly Friedman, director of communications for the education department, points out that drivers approaching a bus from either direction must stop for the flashing red lights.
 
The law places responsibility on bus drivers as well. It requires a bus driver to ensure that the bus is properly marked, to regularly inspect the warning system, and to activate the warning system, including the flashing red lights, at every stop to take on or drop off a student.
 
Last year, the number of violations was 726. This year, the number was 857. The total since 2014 is over 3,400. That’s more than 3,000 miracles – the number of children who safely completed their trip to school and back home in spite of careless drivers.
 
Our children look to the adults to keep them safe. Let’s work together to see that our children arrive at school safely and remain safe while they are there.
 
8-24-18 1:26 p.m. kawx.org

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 24, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK –Usually, the busiest times of the year at the state Capitol are during regular or special sessions.

 

During the interim between sessions there are regular meetings, and each year there is a mock sessions held by Arkansas Boys State and Girls State and the Silver Haired Legislature.

 

This year, a unique gathering of legislators is scheduled for the last week of August and the first week of September. The standing committees are scheduled to meet, so every lawmaker has business at the Capitol.

 

We will be enforcing the provisions of Act 781, a law passed last year that requires all state agencies to justify the continuation of rules and regulations. Some rules have been in effect for decades, and a premise of Act 781 is that it is in the state’s best interest to evaluate the need for rules periodically.

 

If the governor or the legislature do not renew a rule, it will expire within a certain period of time unless the affected state agency justifies its renewal.

 

The Senate and House Judiciary Committees will evaluate long-standing regulations governing the training of police officers and public defenders. They also will evaluate rules governing detention facilities and parole officers.

 

The Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committees will review a long list of rules affecting the licensure of health professionals, workers’ compensation and waste management.

 

The Education Committees will go over rules that affect schools and colleges, as well as libraries and job training centers.

 

The Committees on City, County and Local Affairs will review regulations of local emergency management departments and telephone services.

 

Several agencies work in rural areas of Arkansas, including the Livestock and Poultry Commission, the Forestry Commission, the Plant Board, the Natural Resources Commission, the Game and Fish Commission, the Oil and Gas Commission and the Waterways Commission. They all have rules up for review by the Senate and House Committees on Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development.

 

The Insurance and Commerce Committees will evaluate the need for continued rules governing banks, insurance companies, securities dealers, utilities, funeral homes and burial associations.

Numerous regulatory commissions will have their rules evaluated by legislators on the State Agencies and Governmental Affairs Committees. They include commissions that oversee real estate licensing, fair housing, contractors, home inspectors, accountants and collection agencies.

 

Lawmakers on the State Agencies Committees also will review regulations governing elections, ethics, fire departments, zoning and appraisals.

 

Rules governing the assessments of real and personal property will be evaluated by legislators on the Revenue and Taxation Committees.

 

Highway Matching Funds

 

The Legislative Council, which meets in the interim between sessions, approved the use of $21.9 million in surplus funds to match federal highway funds.

 

The decision means that the Arkansas Transportation Department will qualify for about $200 million in federal funding for highway and bridge maintenance.

 

8-24-18 9:48 a.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Treasurer Tanya Fretz Releases Sales And Road Improvement Tax Information for August 2018


Polk County Treasurer Tanya K. Fretz released the Polk County Sales Tax and Polk County Road Improvement Sales Tax report for August, 2018 today. Both taxes are 1%. The taxes have shown increases for each month this year compared to the same months in 2017, and to date are up $61,877 each this year, suggesting improved retail sales in the county.

 

The total received in August (collections for July) for both taxes was $265,590.36, and the year-to-date total is $2,041,805.00.

 

8-23-18 11:39 a.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Election Commission Holds Drawing For November 6th Ballot Places

 

The Polk County Election Commission met August 23rd at the Polk County Courthose to draw ballot places or positions for the November 6th General Election. The commission, in conjuction with Polk County Clerk Terri Harrioson, witnessed by a number of candidates, drew numbers or allowed candidates to draw numbers to determine the order names will appear on the ballot. In addition to the local races listed below, ballot places were also drawn for statewide races. The Polk County Election Commission is made up of Chairman Bernie Mize, David Ray, and Ladon Copelin. The Commission will meet again at 9:00 a.m. on October 5th to approve poll workers and test voting machines. The October meeting will be held at the Polk County Office Complex on Pine Street in Mena and is open to the public. 

 

Ballot Place Office       Candidate   Party Affiliation
1 Polk County Justice of the Peace District #1       Chris Daniel   I
2 Polk County Justice of the Peace District #1       Ben Finley   R
               
1 Polk County Justice of the Peace District #11       Landon Rowe   I
2 Polk County Justice of the Peace District #1       Tawana Gilbert   I
               
1 Polk County Coroner       Richard Allen Walker   I
2 Polk County Coroner       Brian Bowser   R
               
1 Mena Mayor       Brandon Martin   I
2 Mena Mayor       Seth Smith    
3 Mena Mayor       Ron Tilley    
               
1 Mena Alderman, Ward 3, Position 1       Ed Gibson   I
2 Mena Alderman, Ward 3, Position 1       Craig Cohen   I
               
1 Hatfield Alderman, Position 1       Cecil Fairless   I
2 Hatfield Alderman, Position 1       Diane Osborne   I
               
1 Hatfield Alderman, Position 4       John Gordon   I
2 Hatfield Alderman, Position 1       Riley Johnson   I
               
1 Hatfield Alderman, Position 5       Roger Marney   I
2 Hatfield Alderman, Position 1       Jay “Gator” Gisclair   I

 

8-23-18 10:33 a.m. kawx.org 

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CORPS CLOSES SWIM BEACHES ON DIERKS, DEQUEEN, GILLIAM LAKES UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

 

ASHDOWN, Ark. - The Corps of Engineers, Millwood Project Office has closed Blue Ridge and Jefferson Ridge Park West Swim Beach on Dierks Lake, Coon Creek Swim Beach on Gilliam Lake and Storey Creek Swim Beach on DeQueen Lake until further notice.  The temporary closure is the result of higher than acceptable E. coli levels that were found during routine testing conducted by the Arkansas Department of Health.  


According to Arkansas Department of Health officials, the high bacteria levels could be from a heavy amount of goose droppings. A continual challenge in dealing with residential geese is the fact that people are feeding them. As a result, the geese become more used to human activity and start expecting to be fed every time someone walks or drives into an area. This time of year, the geese are in the molting period so they can't fly which also contributes to the higher concentration of geese in particular areas. Officials ask visitors to not feed the geese.


For more information on the status of other recreation areas in the DeQueen, Dierks and Gilliam lakes area call the Millwood Tri-Lakes Project Office at 870-898-3343, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Recreation information can be found on the Internet at www.swl.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/littlerockusace, and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/usacelittlerock.   

 

8-21-18 3:07 p.m. kawx.org 

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POLK COUNTY SHERIFF'S LOG FOR AUGUST 13TH - 19TH

 
POLK COUNTY SHERIFF’S LOG FOR AUGUST 13TH - 19TH
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of August 13, 2018 – August 19, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
August 13, 2018
Request from a Cove woman for assistance with her 17-year-old daughter. Deputies responded.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Rocky of an individual attempting to vandalize a building. Deputies responded.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Rocky of the theft of appliances from a rental property, totaling losses at $928.00. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from a Grannis man of a missing family member. A Silver Alert was issued.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Tisha Samuels, 37, of Gillham, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 14, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 418 near Potter of being harassed by an acquaintance. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from a Mena man of an individual with suspicious behavior led to the arrest of Dennis R. Stinson, 40, of Mena, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.
Arrested was Stephanie E. Thomas, 42, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 15, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 28 near Hatfield of the theft of a mower, valued at $900.00. Investigation continues.
Report of a disturbance on Highway 71 South near Grannis led to the arrest of Shannon L. House, 51, of Grannis, on Charges of Public Intoxication and Disorderly Conduct.
Report from complainant on School Street in Cove of damage done to a vehicle. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was William H. Hinkle, 45, of Cove, on a Warrant for Possession of a Controlled Substance and a Little Rock PD Warrant.
Arrested by an officer with Arkansas Probation/Parole was Steven W. Bryant, 48, of Mena, on a Parole Hold.
 
August 16, 2018
Report from a Mena woman of an altercation that had occurred the previous evening. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 44 near Mena led to the arrest of Eric T. Cannon, 26, of Mena, on Charges of Disorderly Conduct and a Parole Hold.
Report from complainant on Polk 63 near Yocana of the theft of a chainsaw, valued at $265.00. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Chadwick J. Terrell, 32, of Grannis, on a Warrant for Violation of the Arkansas Hot Check Law.
 
August 17, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 614 near Mena of the violation of an Order of Protection led to the arrest of Robert Castillo, 49, of Mena, on a Warrant for Harrassment.
Report from complainant on Vanna Lane near Cove of the break-in and vandalism done to a vacant residence. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Isaac T. Counts, 19, of Wickes, on two Warrants for Failure to Appear and two Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Charlie B. Tadlock, 31, of Grannis, on five Warrants for Violation of the Arkansas Hot Check Law.
Arrested by an officer with the Drug Task Force was Jaime N. Odom, 20, of Mena, on a Warrant for Delivery of Meth/Cocaine and Fraudulent Use of a Communication Device.
 
August 18, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 35 near Hatfield of the theft of a vehicle. Investigation continues.
 
August 19, 2018
Arrested was Whitney D. Martin, 30, of Mena, on a Warrant for Disorderly Conduct and Terroristic Threatening 2nd Degree.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked three vehicle accidents this week. Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 24 Incarcerated Inmates, with 4 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00554
 
8-21-18 2:18 p.m. kawx.org 

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Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer Announces New Partnership With Polk County School Officials As Reserve Deputies, Trained and Armed

 

In July of 2018, Governor Hutchinson's School Safety Commission released their recommendations on improving the safety of our students. One of their recommendations was putting more officers (full-time and reserves) in the schools.

 

Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer is proud to announce a new partnership with Ouachita River School District, Mena School District, and the Cossatot River School District. Throughout the summer, select school officials from the area school districts attended a Reserve Officer/Part-time Officer training course put on by the Polk County Sheriff's Office.

 

The 120 hour course covered topics including constitutional law, defensive tactics, use of force, investigations, narcotics, Arkansas law, juvenile law, active shooter response, firearms safety, and tactical/combat shooting. Participants were also required to undergo a physical and psychological examination.

 

"While we covered all the topics mandates by the Commission in Law Enforcement Standards and Training, a special emphasis was placed on firearms. We spent a lot of time at the gun range. We shot in the rain, in the heat, at night. These school officials spent much more time at the range than your standard Reserve Officers. They shot more rounds than a full-time certified officer will shoot at the police academy. They worked extremely hard and we are really proud of them". 

 

The class graduated on Thursday, August 9, 2018. Upon graduation, 10 local school officials were sworn in as Reserve Deputies at the Polk County Sheriff's Office. Sheriff Sawyer stated that completion of the Reserve Class is just the beginning of their training. These new Reserve Deputies will be required to re-certify with their firearms every 6 months and will receive updated training throughout the year.

 

The purpose of the class and this program is to help keep our children safe. These Reserve Deputies are now authorized to to be armed on campus. They are trained and authorized to respond to an active shooter and they will do whatever is necessary to protect our children. 

 

8-21-18 1:18 p.m. kawx.org 

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Final Candidate Filings For Polk County Municipal Offices Released, Election November 6th

Polk County Clerk Terri Harrison has released the final list of candiate filings for municipal officies in Polk County for the upcoming general election November 6th. Contested races include the the Mena Mayor's office, one Mena alderman position, and three Hatfiled alderman positions. The remainder of the municipal offices are uncontested. 

 

 

NAME

 

 

 

POSITION

 

 

DATE OF FILING

 

 

 

CITY OF MENA

     
RON TILLEY MAYOR 8/8/2018  
SETH SMITH MAYOR 8/13/2018  
BRANDON MARTIN MAYOR 8/15/2018  
LINDA REXROAD CITY CLERK 8/17/2018  
PATRICK MCDANIEL CITY ATTORNEY 7/30/2018  
JAMES EARL TURNER ALDERMAN WARD 1, POSITION 1 8/15/2018  
TERRI NEUGENT ALDERMAN WARD 1, POSITION 2 7/27/2018  
DWIGHT DOUGLAS ALDERMAN WARD 2, POSITION 1 7/27/2018  
MARY ALICE HEAD ALDERMAN WARD 2, POSITION 2 8/6/2018  
ANDY BROWN ALDERMAN WARD 3, POSITION 1 8/15/2018  
ED GIBSON ALDERMAN WARD 3, POSITION 2 8/13/2018  
CRAIG L. COHEN ALDERMAN WARD 3, POSITION 2

8/15/2018

 

 

 

TOWN OF HATFIELD

     
LINDA E. DENTON MAYOR 8/7/2018  
MICHAEL CALLAHAN RECORDER/CLERK 8/15/2018  
DIANE OSBORNE ALDERMAN, POSITION 1 8/1/2018  
CECIL FAIRLESS ALDERMAN, POSITION 1 7/30/2018  
LARRY D. DENTON ALDERMAN, POSITION 2 8/7/2018  
LAWANA D. CALLAHAN ALDERMAN, POSITION 3 8/14/2018  
RILEY JOHNSON ALDERMAN, POSITION 4 8/7/2018  
JOHN GORDON ALDERMAN, POSITION 4 7/27/2018  
JAY "GATOR" GISCLAIR ALDERMAN, POSITION 5 7/30/2018  
ROGER MARNEY ALDERMAN, POSITION 5 7/27/2018  

 

 

TOWN OF COVE

     
JOAN HEADLEY MAYOR 8/2/2018  
BARBARA VALLEE RECORDER/TREASURER 8/2/2018  
JOHN SLAUGHTER ALDERMAN POSITION 1 8/2/2018  
CHARLOTTE CRUMP ALDERMAN POSITION 2 8/13/2018  
BOYD S. SMITH ALDERMAN POSITION 3 8/9/2018  
DANKER MIZE ALDERMAN POSITION 4 8/2/2018  
DARRIS BURK ALDERMAN POSITION 5 8/2/2018  

 

 

TOWN OF VANDERVOORT

     
TERESIA HARTLEY MAYOR 8/14/2018  
SAMANTHA BOYETTE CLERK 8/14/2018  
ROBERT A. HARTLEY ALDERMAN, POSITION 1 8/14/2018  
JASON BOYETTE ALDERMAN, POSITION 2 8/14/2018  
BRITTANY PHILLIPS ALDERMAN, POSITION 3 8/15/2018  
JACKIE TURNER ALDERMAN, POSITION 4 8/14/2018  
RICKY L. McKENZIE ALDERMAN, POSITION 5 8/14/2018  

 

 

TOWN OF WICKES

     
SANDRA WILCHER MAYOR 8/15/2018  
TRACY MORRIS RECORDER/TREASURER 8/15/2018  
LARRY WATKINS ALDERMAN POSTION 1 8/15/2018  
LINDA GILLASPY ALDERMAN POSITION 2 8/15/2018  
MARY FERGUSON ALDERMAN POSITION 3 8/15/2018  
NEAL JENKINS ALDERMAN POSITION 4 8/15/2018  
MELINDA K. KIGHT ALDERMAN POSITION 5 8/15/2018  

 

 

TOWN OF GRANNIS

     
DWIGHT W. BILLINGS MAYOR 8/9/2018  
BARBARA FRACHISEUR RECORDER/TREASURER 8/9/2018  
DONNIE APPLE ALDERMAN, POSITION 1 8/9/2018  
BILLY RICHARDSON ALDERMAN, POSITION 2 8/9/2018  
TAMERA D. HINSON ALDERMAN, POSITION 3 8/9/2018  
CHRIS FRACHISEUR ALDERMAN, POSITION 4 8/9/2018  
JIMMY HUNTER ALDERMAN, POSITION 5 8/9/2018  

 

8-21-18 11:45 a.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Police Report for August 5th through August 18th, 2018

 
Mena Police Report for August 5th through August 18th, 2018
 
August 5 & 6, 2018
 
Thomas Hargroves, 38, of Houma, LA, was arrested and charged with theft of property regarding an incident at a local restaurant and theft of property (shoplifting) after a call to a local retail store.
 
Report was made of an altercation between a woman and her son-in-law regarding visitation.  No charges have been filed.
 
August 7, 2018
 
A missing person case was instigated, but the individual contacted the reporting party so no report was necessary.
 
August 8, 2018
 
A local man reported that he was harassed by an acquaintance regarding his driving and parking skills.  No charges filed.
 
August 9, 2018
 
Report was made of a local residents being harassed by an acquaintance.  No charges have been filed.
 
Owner of a local business reported that someone had made an unsuccessful attempt to break into her building.  Case is under investigation.
 
A local property owner reported that someone had damaged the front door to a house he owns.  Case pending.
 
August 10, 2018
 
Kristen Wootton, 34, of Mena was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct after officers responded to a call regarding a fight.
 
Report was made of a missing person.  The individual was located in Tyler, Texas and relatives were dispatched to bring them back to Mena.
 
August 11, 2018
 
Report was made of someone stealing a license plate from a vehicle.  The glove box had been ransacked as well.  Case under investigation.
Heather Robinson, 43, of Mena was arrested on two outstanding warrants for violation of Arkansas’ Hot Check Law.
 
August 12, 2018
 
Report was made of someone harassing a local woman on the telephone.  Case pending.
 
August 13, 2018
 
A local woman reported the theft of a show rabbit from a pen in her yard.  She later called to say that the animal had been located under a nearby house.
 
August 14, 2018
 
Report was made of an unknown party attempting to scam a local resident.  Case is pending.
 
August 15, 2018
 
Leo Yuspeh, 67, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct after a call to a local neighborhood.
 
August 16, 2018
 
Jennifer Pierce, 36, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct after an incident on a local street.
 
August 17, 2018
 
A Mena woman reported that her purse had been stolen from her vehicle while she was in a local laundromat.  Case is pending.
 
Jeremy Burns, 41, of Mena was arrested on a warrant from the Mena Police Department.
 
Jamie Odom, 20, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.
 
August 18, 2018
 
Report was made of a dog running-at-large in a local neighborhood.  Case referred to animal control.
 
A local man was warned about burning rubbish on a parking lot.
 
8-20-18 1:15 p.m. kawx.org 

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Forest Inventory and Analysis Report Provides Updated Arkansas Forest Data

 

Little Rock, AR. – According to the 2017 Forest Inventory and Analysis report, Arkansas’s forests continue to thrive with forested acreage remaining steady at 19 million acres, 56% of the state’s total land area.  Data for the report is collected through the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, a collaborative partnership of the U. S. Forest Service Southern Research Station and state forestry agencies. FIA foresters with the Arkansas Agriculture Department’s Forestry Commission (AFC) conduct measurements that provide valuable data including updates to forest growth, damage, mortality, health, biomass, ownership trends, timber availability, and land use trends. The 2017 Arkansas FIA report is available, here.

 

Arkansas forest highlights included in the annual FIA report include:

·         Arkansas is home to approximately 11.9 billion trees.

·         69% of Arkansas forestland is owned by private, non-industrial landowners

·         Since 1978, Arkansas forestland has increased by more than one million acres.

·         In terms of forest composition, the two largest forest types are a hardwood mixture of oak and hickory species (41%); and pine species (31%).

·         Pine accounts for 42% of the state’s total tree volume.

·         Hardwood accounts for 58% of the state’s total tree volume.

·         Arkansas contains the largest National Forest area in the South with 2.5 million acres within the Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests.

·         The most heavily forested county in Arkansas remains Dallas County.

·         The least forested county in Arkansas remains Mississippi County.

·         The growth rate for hardwood and pine trees continues to be greater than the removal rate.

 

“This data is the only statewide forestry-specific information of its kind.  It is paramount to forestry and conservation agencies who monitor forest health and protect us from wildfires, and to forest industry partners seeking locations for growth based on the availability of high quality timber,” says State Forester Joe Fox. “This data proves that Arkansas forests are healthy, productive, and fast-growing, which makes us the prime location for new investments, partnerships, and products for the forest industry in the south.”

 

FIA data is obtained from more than 4,000 permanent inventory plots across the state. FIA foresters collect measurements on 20% of the plots annually and generate state-specific forest data that is reported to the U. S. Forest Service Southern Research Station. Compare FIA reports dating back to 2009, and see full forest inventory reports as far back as 1970 through the Southern Research Station, here.

 

The AAD is dedicated to the development and implementation of policies and programs for Arkansas agriculture and forestry to keep its farmers and ranchers competitive in national and international markets while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of the state and nation.  Visit www.agriculture.arkansas.gov.

 

8-20-18 12:58 p.m. kawx.org 

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ARKANSAS LAW ENFORCEMENT WARN DRIVERS TO 'DRIVE SOBER OR GET PULLED OVER'-Labor Day Holiday Enforcement Ramped Up

 
Over the next few weeks, Arkansas law enforcement officers will participate in the national campaign to prevent impaired driving. The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over operation is underway now and will continue until Monday, Spetember 3rd.

  The intensified enforcement campaign coincides with the Labor Day holiday weekend, which is one of the deadliest times of the year for drunk-driving fatalities. According to the latest data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10,497 lives were lost in drunk-driving crashes during 2016. Statistically, that means one person is killed every 50 minutes by a drunk driver on our nation’s roads. Over the Labor Day holiday period in 2016 there were 433 traffic crash fatalities nationwide. Of the fatal crashes, more than one-third (36 percent) involved drivers who were drunk. 

  “We need motorists to understand that they must make the smart decision to drive sober - Labor Day and every day,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police and the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative. “Drunk driving is a crime that is totally preventable.” 

  During this period, law enforcement officers in Arkansas will reinforce their patrol assignments aimed at drastically reducing the number of impaired drivers who endanger themselves and others. The public will also notice an increase in state and national media messages designed to educate everyone about the dangers of drunk driving. 

  As you head out to Labor Day festivities, remember: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. The Arkansas State Police Highway Safety Office recommends the following:

    - Always plan ahead whenever you expect to drive and consume alcohol.
    - Designate a sober driver before leaving and give that person your keys.
    - If you have been drinking, call a taxi, take the bus or call a sober friend or family member to get you to your destination safely.
    - Promptly contact law enforcement to report drunk drivers you see on the roadways.
    - Always wear your seat belt.
    - If you’re on a motorcycle, use protective safety equipment.

  For more information on the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign, visit TrafficSafetyMarketing.gov or contact the Arkansas Highway Safety Office at (501) 618-8136.  For more on the ongoing “Toward Zero Deaths” campaign, visit TZDarkansas.org.
 
8-19-18 12:49 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Address: Helping Children Get a Head Start in Life

 
 
LITTLE ROCK – Experts in academic success generally agree that access to high-quality learning programs for preschool children greatly improves the potential for success in high school and beyond.
But there are families who struggle financially, and for them, the options are limited because of the cost of child care.
 
In Arkansas, low-income families can apply through the Department of Human Services for vouchers that will pay for the care of children while their parents work or attend school.
 
Employees in the division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education help families navigate the challenges and help them to find financial aid. The money for assistance programs often has been hard to come by, which means that some families must wait for help.
 
By spring of this year, Arkansas’s list of those waiting for vouchers that would pay for child care had grown to 1,400 families with more than 2,000 children. Some of those families had been waiting for more than a year.
 
I am happy to report that with a block grant of $26 million from the federal Child Care Development Fund, we have eliminated the waiting list, and we even have money left over.
 
I announced in May that we would receive the money after President Trump signed off on the grant, which increased the Child Care Development Block Grant by $5.8 billion. The Department of Human Services immediately began contacting families on the list.
 
There were 2,056 children on the list, and 1,683 of those are receiving help. The parents of the other 373 declined assistance or had moved.
 
As of today, the number of children on the list is zero. We have enough money remaining to assist others
 
The additional money from the block grant increased the number of children we can serve from about 5,300 children to more than 9,000 infants, toddlers, and children who are in pre-kindergarten or in after-school and summer break programs.
 
This is a big moment for the families of Arkansas because it gives their children a head start on life. Many of these children will join our workforce and make it stronger because of the opportunity this block grant has provided.
 
This makes this a big moment in Arkansas.
 
8-18-18   11:40 a.m.   kawx.org

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Listening to Arkansas Farmers and Ranchers

 

One of my summer traditions is traveling across Arkansas talking with agricultural producers and seeing the great work being done in our state to feed and clothe the nation and the world. The Ag Tour is a cornerstone of my work during the August in-state work period. I spend several days crossing the state to visit farms, ranches and agri-businesses to see firsthand how Washington’s decision-making is impacting their operations.

 

From Fayetteville to Dermott, the 2018 Ag Tour covered hundreds of miles to visit diverse operations such as livestock ranches, ag research stations, row crop farms, orchards and more.

 

Agriculture is an economic driver for our state. It accounts for nearly one-quarter of our state’s economic activity, making it Arkansas’s largest industry. This is one of the reasons I am proud to serve on the Senate Agriculture Committee, and why I am committed to traveling across the state to listen to people involved in the industry.

 

With many issues that directly affect the agriculture community front and center in Washington right now, the tour was very timely.

 

We are in the process of reconciling the differences between the versions of the Farm Bill passed in the Senate and the House of Representatives. As a member of the conference committee that will determine the final bill, it is vital that I have input directly from producers to ensure it meets the needs of Arkansas’s agriculture community.

 

The farm economy and rural America have been struggling for the past few years. Passage of a Farm Bill would protect key risk management tools and provide certainty for our agricultural producers. I look forward to delivering this certainty and predictability to our farmers and ranchers.

 

The current trade environment was also heavily discussed. There is an understandable anxiety amongst farmers and producers over the rising tensions between the U.S. and some of our trading partners. 

 

No one wants a trade war. However, the producers I spoke with agreed action was needed to push back on unfair trading partners like China. While every farmer we met with said they appreciate President Trump’s efforts to support the producers caught up in the standoff, they stressed that “trade over aid” is what is needed for a long-term solution. Farmers want Washington to protect the markets they have and work to open new ones. Given a level playing field, our agricultural producers can compete with anyone.

 

The farmers and ranchers I visited with were also very supportive of our efforts to reduce the regulatory burdens family farmers and producers were saddled with by the previous administration. Sensible regulations benefit every American, but excessive rules that defy commonsense hurt the agriculture industry. More work remains to rollback unnecessary regulation, but the progress we have made is having a positive effect.

 

As we continue our work in Washington to help create an environment that allows our farmers and ranchers to succeed, it is important that we take direction from those whose livelihoods are directly impacted. There simply is no substitute for visiting with the hardworking Arkansans who work the land. I look forward to taking what I learned from them during my agriculture tour to craft smart and effective policies that will benefit them and help our entire state.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-17-18 6:07 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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Polk County Election Commission Sets Meeting - November Ballot Positions Drawing

 

The Polk County Election Commission will meet next Thursday, August 23rd, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. in the courthouse basement conference room, according to Polk County Clerk Terri Harrison. The purpose of this meeting is to draw for ballot positions for the November General Election.  All meetings are open to the public and all candidates are invited to attend.  

 

8-17-18 6:01 p.m. kawx.org 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Do you know what goals your child should be setting for this school year?  Do you know what mental health services are available at your child’s school?

 

These are just a couple of topics that parents and teachers should be discussing in the first weeks of school.  But remembering to approach every topic while finding classrooms and gathering school supplies can be overwhelming.

 

That is part of the reason why the Department of Education began the “My Child/My Student” campaign. 

 

The goal of this campaign, in its fifth year, is to encourage positive and productive communication between parents and teachers. Ongoing communication builds a support network that encourages student learning and success.

 

The campaign highlights a college and career readiness topic and student safety topic each month during the campaign, which begins in August and ends in May. Resources and links to helpful information for parents and teachers are posted at www.arkansased.gov and ADE's social media throughout the school year. The 2018-2019 Topics List is available and provides questions for parents and teachers to consider when communicating with each other.  

 

The topics for August include setting goals and school bus safety.

 

Parents and teachers are encouraged to discuss answers to the following:

 

·      What goals should my child/my student set for this school year?

·      What resources are available to help my child/my student if he/she is struggling to reach goals? 

·      How will progress be measured, communicated and celebrated?

·      What school bus safety tips should I share with my child/my student?

 

Recommended topics for September include Reading Initiative for Student Excellence (RISE) and Mental Health Awareness.

 

Research is clear: grades and attendance are directly impacted by a parent’s involvement. We encourage parents to take advantage of the resources available from ADE to help make guide your participation.

 

8-17-18 5:50 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 17, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Last year the Arkansas Economic Development Commission agreed to offer financial incentives for 133 new projects.

 

They will create an estimated 3,460 jobs with average salaries of $21.81 an hour. The companies that received financial incentives from the state will invest about $3.184 billion in Arkansas.

 

Legislation approved in 2001 requires the AEDC to submit regular reports to lawmakers detailing the effectiveness of the numerous tax incentives and financial assistance programs that state government uses to recruit industry. Also, the AEDC reports on the economic climate in Arkansas compared to neighboring states.

 

After AEDC officials signed agreements in 2017 to provide assistance for 133 new projects, it increased the total of AEDC projects to 256. That compares to a total of 206 projects in 2015 and 210 projects in 2016.

 

Signing 133 agreements last year represents a tremendous improvement over recent years. In 2015, the AEDC signed offers with 118 companies and in 2016 it finalized agreements with 88 companies.

 

The total investment value of the 256 projects in Arkansas that received AEDC assistance is more than $7 billion. The total number of jobs added to the Arkansas economy since 2015, with help from AEDC programs, is 12,805. Their average salary is $20.81 an hour.

 

According to U.S. Commerce Department figures, jobs created with the assistance of AEDC incentives pay higher average salaries than other Arkansas jobs.

 

The unemployment rate in Arkansas in May was 3.8 percent, near to historic lows.

 

The legislature has approved numerous incentives to help the AEDC recruit new industries, and to encourage existing industries in the state to expand.

 

Some incentives are based on payroll, so a company that creates high-paying jobs will qualify for more tax breaks.

 

Other incentives, particularly in the manufacturing sector, offer sales tax exemptions for equipment and machinery, and for electricity and natural gas costs. Other incentives specifically target high-tech firms, and offer tax incentives for their research and development costs.

 

The state also offers help with job training and infrastructure, such as rail spurs, water and drainage systems, preparation of land and access roads.

 

Two years ago, Arkansas voters greatly expanded the state’s capacity to issue economic development bonds when they approved Issue 3, which had been placed on the ballot by the legislature.

 

The constitutional amendment removed the former cap of 5 percent of general revenue that limited the amount of general obligation bonds the state could issue at one time. Removal of the cap allows the state to finance more than one large project at a time, if the legislature approves.

 

The amendment also granted local governments more flexibility to issue economic development bonds, by allowing them to work with local chambers of commerce and in collaboration with neighboring cities and counties.

 

The AEDC has programs specifically designed to promote small businesses, innovative technology businesses and firms owned by minorities and women. Also, it has an office that works to promote the filming of movies in Arkansas, and an office that works to expand and strengthen military installations.

 

8-17-18 5:46 p.m. kawx.org 

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Bear Hunting Seminar Slated For Fort Smith Nature Center

 

FORT SMITH - Myron Means, large carnivore program coordinator for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, will host a seminar dedicated to hunting black bears at the Janet Huckabee Arkansas River Valley Nature Center from 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday Aug. 30.

 

Means will present every aspect of hunting Natural State bears from scouting and bear behavior, to field preparation for the hunt and care of harvested bears should a hunter score.

 

“This will basically be like Bear Hunting 101,” Means said. “If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears, I’ll try to give you every bit of knowledge you need, but success will still hinge on how much effort you put into the hunt itself.”

 

Participants will get a crash course in bear physiology and what motivates bears during hunting season.

 

“Bear hunting really is all about finding food,” Means said. “They don’t have a rut during the fall like deer, but are about to go into their den cycle so they’re focused on one thing - eating.”

 

Means will help hunters use this knowledge to increase their chances of harvesting a bear, with tactics developed for private and public land hunters.

 

“We’ll cover baiting sites and how to pattern bears on private land,” Means said. “But we’ll also cover public land hunting, where baiting is not allowed.”

 

Finding bears on public land still revolves around finding food sources, but it requires much more work in scouting. Means says if acorns and other foods are plentiful, the bears will not need to move much to eat. During low mast years, they’ll move more and focus harder on particular trees that may still be producing acorns. 

 

“The secret is finding these ‘natural bait sites’ and scouting them without disturbing bears that may be feeding,” Means said. “Bears are much less forgiving than deer. If you bust them out scouting, they won’t be back. On private land bait sites, you can get away with a little more, but on public land you have to really minimize your presence.”

 

Means says focusing your scouting on late morning and early afternoon improves the chances of not running into a bear before hunting season. Hunters should look for areas with good mast crop and telltale signs of bears visiting, such as bear droppings or scat and bear trails. Bear trails are easily distinguished from deer and other game trails by the presence of small, dished out impressions from repeated footsteps in the same spot.

 

“Bears will step in nearly the exact same spot every time they travel a trail,” Means said. “So it will literally look like you went and put down a bunch of saucers in alternating patterns on each side of the trail.”

 

The seminar also will address what to do if your new knowledge pays off. Hunters can be intimidated by the idea of having this massive bear down and not knowing what to do with it to take care of their trophy. 

 

“Bears are much different than deer and can spoil quickly if not cared for properly,” Means said. “The fat layer they are putting on when gorging themselves can be very oily. Combined with them putting on their winter coats, a downed bear’s fat layer can begin rendering itself from the animal’s trapped body heat. That oil can saturate the meat and taint it with an unpleasant flavor.”

 

Means says hunters after bears should prepare for success and have coolers, plenty of sharp knives and rope waiting in the truck should they hit their mark. Acting quickly to skin, quarter and cool the bear is the key to great meals later.

 

“You also want to get as much of that extrastitial (outer) fat layer off as you can before storage,” Means said. “There’s enough marbling in a bear’s muscles to give the meat flavor and prevent it from drying out while cooking. That outer layer just adds too much and has an unpleasant taste.”

 

“Proper field care and processing of a bear can make it the best wild game you’ve ever eaten, but it’s definitely more work than a whitetail,” Means said. “We want everyone interested in these amazing animals to have the knowledge they need to succeed.”

 

8-15-18 3:33 p.m. kawx.org

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Weekly Fishing Report

Click on the area below that you are interested in.

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 15, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-15-18 3:20 p.m. kawx.org 

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The Notice of Intent Deadline Is Almost Here

 

 

Tomorrow is the deadline to file you annual Notice of Intent to Home School.

Arkansas law requires home schoolers to give their local school districts written notice of their intent to home school every year. The deadline to file your Notice of Intent to Home School is August 15.

There are two ways to file your Notice of Intent:

1. You can file the Notice of Intent form electronically via the Department of Education's website by clicking here. You can find helpful instructions for filing the Notice of Intent online by clicking here.

2. You can download and print a paper copy of the Notice of Intent to Home School by clicking here. Paper forms must be sent to your local public school district superintendent's office. You can hand-deliver the form to your superintendent's office, or you can mail it.

If you have questions about filing the Notice of Intent, contact our office via email or at 501-978-5503.

 

8-14-18      11:35 a.m.      kawx.org

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ARKANSAS STATE TROOPERS LOOKING FOR RECRUITS TO FILL 2019 ACADEMY CLASS

 
 
AUGUST 14, 2018
  The Arkansas State Police is looking for eligible recruits to fill the 2019 academy class. Qualified individuals will be selected to enter the Arkansas State Police Recruit Academy, with a start date of February 24, 2019.

   “If you have what it takes to become an Arkansas State Trooper, we want to meet you,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police.  “If you are selected, you will find yourself on the path of one of the most rewarding careers imaginable.” 

   The expectations placed on Arkansas State Troopers are extraordinary, and that is why the Arkansas State Police has the highest required standards for applicants. Minimum qualifications to be considered are:  

    - Must be a United States citizen and at least 21 years of age.
   - Must possess a medical release to participate in a physical fitness test.
   - Must possess a current and valid driver license.
   - Must be a certified high school graduate or possess a GED equivalency.
   - Must meet visual acuity requirements. 
   - Never convicted of a felony criminal charge.
   - Never convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence charge.
   - Pass a comprehensive background check.
   - No tattoos shall be visible on an applicant’s body that could be seen if wearing the uniform of  an Arkansas State Trooper.  

  The Arkansas State Police Recruit Academy is a 21 week intense training environment, designed to teach our recruits the job skills necessary to perform the duties of a trooper. Those selected to attend our academy will receive more than 1,000 hours of training covering all aspects of law enforcement. 

   Recruits begin earning a salary after being offered a position by the Director of the Arkansas State Police and reporting to the academy.  The entry salary for an Arkansas State Trooper Recruit is $40,340.  Following four and ½ years of service, a trooper becomes eligible for promotion to the rank of Trooper First Class, receiving a salary increase of 10% or an increase to the entry pay level of $45,010, whichever is greater.  Upon seven and ½ years of service a trooper is promoted to the rank of corporal, awarded a 10% raise or an increase to the entry pay level of $50,222, or whichever is greater.  

   Benefits include:  
    - Healthcare insurance is paid by the state for a trooper (recruit) and family
   - Certificate pay up to $1,200 annually (*state police director discretion)
   - Retirement contributions are paid by the state.
   - Uniforms and equipment are furnished.
   - Eligible for career service pay following ten years of state service.

  Interested applicants are encouraged to visit the Arkansas State Police web site at www.asp.arkansas.gov, where they can find all the forms necessary to start the hiring process. The recruiting page also provides applicants a means to directly contact a recruiter. 
 
8-14-18   10:52 a.m.   kawx.org

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For August 6th - 12th

SHERIFF’S LOG FOR AUGUST 6th - 12th
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of August 6, 2018 – August 12, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
August 6, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 8 East in Board Camp of the theft of $200.00 in cash. Investigation continues.
Report of a disturbance that had occurred earlier on Highway 71 South in
Cove. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 270 near Eagleton of the break-in and theft of equipment, valued at $30,000.00. Investigation continues.
Report of a possible violation of an Order of Protection. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Polk 295 near Hatfield of damage done to a rental property. Deputy responded.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Rita D. Labbe, 57, of Wickes, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Crystal D.
Morgan, 30, of Wickes, on Charges of DWI, Driving Left of Center, No Driver’s License and Refusal to Submit.
 
August 7, 2018
Report from a Hatfield woman of a missing family member. The individualwas later located.
Report from a Mena woman of child custody issues. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on North Lewis Street in Cove of possible identity theft. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Bobby E. Hedrick, 47, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 8, 2018
Report from complainant on School Street in Cove of vandalism done to a camper and a vehicle. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 277 near Vandervoort of the break-in and theft of a computer and three firearms. Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Harris Road near Hatfield of identity fraud, totaling losses at $664.37. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
August 9, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 93 near Rocky of the theft of a vehicle, valued at $2,000.00. Arrested was Allen D. Phillips, 49, of Mena, on a Charge of Theft of Property.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Levi A. Wilson, 22, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 10, 2018
Report from complainant on Polk 114 in Acorn of damage done to two water meters. Investigation continues.
Report from a Mena man of a possible violation of an Order of Protection. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Hatfield of a scam on social media, totaling losses at $400.00.
Arrested was Matthew E. Cannon, 38, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 11, 2018
Report from complainant on Fretz Lane near Mena of the theft of 16 garden plants.
Report from complainant on Highway 246 West in Hatfield of the theft of jewelry, valued at $2,000.00. Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Alissha A. Jamieson, 26, of Fort Smith, on a Charge of Obstructing Governmental Operations.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Joshua C. Stephenson, 26, of Shreveport, LA, on Charges of Following too Close, Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Violation of a Protection Order.
 
August 12, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Potter of vandalism done to a vehicle, totaling losses at $50.00. Investigation continues.
Report from a Waldron woman of issues with child visitation regarding children residing in Polk County.
Report from complainant on Polk 655 near Yocana of the theft of a tractor. Investigation continues.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Dylan G. Morgan, 26, of Mena, on Charges of DWI, Speeding, No Driver’s License, Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance and Refusal to Submit.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Teiona Kimbrough, 39, of Mena, on Charges of Public Intoxication, Disorderly Conduct and Obstructing Governmental Operations.
Arrested was Steven L. Stroud, 54, of Mena, on three Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 22 Incarcerated Inmates, with 4 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00536
 
8-13-18 4:50 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson Weekly Radio Address: Listening to AR Farmers

 
 
LITTLE ROCK – I’m fresh off a two-day road trip through southwest Arkansas. This is the second year for my Ag Tour, which allows me to pull off my tie and listen to the concerns of our farmers. I also hear many stories of their success as stewards of Arkansas’s biggest industry.
 
Farmers and agriculture are the backbone of our economy. They work long hours seven days a week. In addition to talking about the normal risks and challenges of farming, we discussed a different challenge that has been in the news lately – tariffs, which pose a real risk of retaliatory action against agriculture.
 
Our farmers are rightly concerned about the effect of tariffs on the export of their crops. But what I heard from them during my Ag Tour is that they are willing to give the strategy some time to work. Farmers understand that President Trump is trying to achieve more fairness in our trading relationships.
 
The effect of the administration’s position is cause for optimism. In regard to NAFTA, we appear close to a modernized agreement that acknowledges the importance of continued North American Trade.  We’ve worked with the EU to set mutual goals to reduce tariffs. And even in the midst of the escalating trade war with China, its leaders have softened and agreed to rebalance trade and to buy more of our agricultural commodities.
 
These negotiations are encouraging, but our patient farmers know that a prolonged trade war will take a significant toll by diminishing their foreign sales and by discouraging direct foreign investment. We support the president, but we hope he can declare victory soon.
 
Closer to home, Ag Tour 2018 happened to coincide with the Farmers Market Week in Arkansas. If you want to talk to a farmer, you don’t have to tour the state. There are farmers as close as your nearest Farmer’s Market, where you can buy corn, squash, watermelons, purple hulls, and peaches without paying a tariff.
 
Arkansas agriculture produces everything from the meat and vegetables we put on our supper tables, the wood we build our tables with, and the cotton we weave into the clothes we wear to the table. Thank you for your hard work and your willingness to face the risks such as the destruction of your crops by extreme weather to the perils of international political tiffs over tariffs.
 
8-13-18 6:59 a.m. kawx.org

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

A recent survey conducted with 1,400 adults found that only one-third could name all three branches of government.  Only 37% of those surveyed can name rights guaranteed under the First Amendment.

 

This is not the only study that shows a need for more civics education.  Studies also tell us that there is a clear relationship between informed citizens and active participation in government. That is just one of the reasons why we take the month of September to visit with schools in our district.

 

In the 2015 Regular Session, the Arkansas General Assembly passed a resolution designating September as annual “Take Your Legislator to School Month”.   In addition to helping students learn more about the legislative process, this bipartisan initiative was also motivated by a need for members to fully understand the issues and challenges facing public schools.  It also gives districts an opportunity to showcase innovative solutions developed by our educators.

 

The resolution encourages public school districts to plan special events with their local legislators.  Examples could include allowing legislators to visit classrooms, reading to students, or present guest lectures. Districts could also sponsor panel discussions in which administrators and teachers discuss issues facing their schools. 

 

The information we learn from this face to face interaction becomes invaluable during the legislative session. Our education committee hears testimony on hundreds of bills every session. Knowing the needs of our schools in advance helps guide our decision making process in a fast-paced environment.

 

On our website, www.arkansashouse.org, we have a section titled “Kids in the House”.  There you will find all the materials your local school district will need to take advantage of this opportunity.  In the materials, we have included a spreadsheet listing the members who represent all 257 districts in our state.

 

We hope all of you have a great first week back to school. 

 

8-10-18 4:54 p.m. kawx.org 

 

 

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Schools Cannot Prevent Student Prayer: State Commissioner of Education's Memo

 

This week Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key issued an annual memo to public school superintendents statewide reminding them that schools that receive federal funds cannot stop students from engaging in “constitutionally protected prayer in public schools.”

Public schools must file paperwork verifying that the school has no policy in place that would prevent students from praying at school.

While courts have ruled that teachers cannot lead students in prayer in the classroom, the Constitution and federal law generally protect students’ rights to pray, read scripture, and form religious groups or clubs on campus, provided that they do not disrupt school activities. Students also are free to talk about religion or their religious beliefs as part of a relevant class assignment or with their friends during lunch or other free times at school.

That is why Family Council supports activities like Bring Your Bible to School Day, and it’s why we have said students are free to talk about Jesus or their church if a teacher asks them to write a paper about what’s important to them.

Commissioner Key’s memo is a good reminder that students do not check their religious liberties at the door when they walk into a schoolhouse.

8-10-18  2:08p.m.  kawx.org

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FDA Contracts With Company to Use Aborted Fetal Remains in Research

 

In August of 2016 the National Institutes of Health announced it wanted to use public funds for research to create human-animal hybrids or “chimeras.” The goal was to inject human stem cells into modified animal embryos in hopes of discovering new cures or “growing” human organs for transplant patients.

 

At the time the news sounded like nothing less than something out of a supermarket tabloid. Two years later, however, we’ve learned the Food and Drug Administration is apparently contracting with a group in California to inject mice with tissue obtained from aborted babies.

 

In June the FDA announced it was awarding a contract to Advanced Bioscience Resources, Inc., “to acquire Tissue for Humanized Mice.”

 

The announcement went on to say “[Advanced Bioscience Resources, Inc.] is the only company that can provide the human fetal tissue needed to continue the ongoing research being led by the FDA. Fresh human tissues are required for implantation into severely immune-compromised mice to create chimeric animals that have a human immune system.”

In other words, Advanced Bioscience Resources will be providing the FDA with fetal tissue that it can use in research — and the fetal tissue almost certainly is being harvested from aborted babies.

 

8-10-18  2:06 p.m.  kawx.org

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 
Helping Student Veterans Learn and Succeed
 
Student veterans will have new education benefits to use this school year as they pursue their career goals. This investment in our veterans provides them with more tools and resources to prepare them for civilian life.
 
In 2017, Congress approved and the president signed the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act (Forever GI Bill). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) continues to implement these education benefit improvements designed to better serve veterans’ needs today.
 
Several provisions took effect at the beginning of August, including making post-9/11 Purple Heart recipients eligible for full education benefits for up to three years, updating eligibility requirements for Guard and Reservist service and reallocating education benefits to surviving family members.
 
We’ve worked to modernize the education benefit and equip members of the workforce with the skills they need for 21st century jobs. That’s why the Forever GI Bill updates include opportunities to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs, computer programming and career technical training.
 
I was pleased to author a provision in the legislation to open doors to training and jobs for veterans reentering the workforce. Promoting technical skills such as computer coding and programming is a win-win for veterans and employers.
 
As a member of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, I am monitoring the VA’s implementation of the Forever GI Bill and I will continue to provide oversight to ensure veterans have access to the lifetime education benefits they earned.
 
We know that there is still work to do to break down barriers standing between veterans and their education benefits. Delays in the processing of tuition payments - by the VA’s unintentionally slow processing or errors by school certifying officials - have caused some student veterans to endure financial hardship and be denied access to higher education. That’s why I introduced the Servicemembers Improved Transition through Reforms for Ensuring Progress (SIT-REP) Act.
 
Our veterans deserve certainty when it comes to their education benefits. Eliminating financial burdens and ensuring access to school facilities is a commonsense step in supporting our student veterans. This bipartisan legislation will prevent veterans from being held responsible for fees and penalties associated with delays in the processing of tuition payments and allow them to focus on their education rather than financial obligations.
 
This is especially important given that the implementation of the Forever GI Bill may result in a higher volume of claims that must be processed by the VA and schools. 
 
Similar legislation passed the House of Representatives in May. I am hopeful that we can continue that momentum by passing this legislation in the Senate.
 
We have a responsibility to honor our promise to those who stood in defense of our nation. Updates to veterans’ education benefits help empower these men and women in their transition to civilian life. I look forward to working with my colleagues to continue our commitment to improve veteran resources.
 
8-10-18   12:41p.m.   kawx.org
 
 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague-911 System Upgrades

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 10, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Every day in Arkansas more than 6,500 calls are made to 911.

 

Legislators heard a request for upgrades to the 911 system at a recent meeting, from a coalition of state, city and county officials who work in emergency management.  The name of the new system is New Generation 911, or simply NG 911.

 

The rapid growth in cell phone use is an example of how 911 systems are constantly adapting to new technologies.

 

More than 90 percent of the emergency calls made today are from cell phones. It seems as if every day, new phones expand our capacity to transmit images, videos, charts and graphs. Telephones became cell phones, which became mobile devices.

 

The innovations are driven by consumer demand and by marketing on the part of telephone companies. They’re possible because of advances in digital technology.

 

Yet most 911 calls made in Arkansas must travel along an analog circuit at least once before they reach an emergency dispatcher and the equipment that can locate the geographic source of the calls.

In states like Arkansas, which are trying to upgrade their 911 call systems, emergency responders point to an incident that occurred in North Carolina in 2016. Outdated technology was a factor when it took 11 minutes for responders to arrive, even though they were less than a mile away when the man called 911.

 

When the infrastructure of our 911 systems was created, landlines were the norm. Emergency dispatchers could pinpoint the source of a call from a landline, but not calls made with cell phones.

After the nationwide boom in cell phone use in the 1990s, federal regulations and upgrades by telephone companies allowed 911 dispatchers to trace the location of calls from cell phones.

But new technologies are becoming popular, such as messaging over social media and the Internet. The ability of current 911 systems in Arkansas has almost come to the point where it can no longer adapt to the flood of new technologies.

 

The response times of emergency dispatchers varies across Arkansas. The 6,500 emergency calls made in the state each day are routed to 127 call centers, officially known as Public Safety Answering Points. For example, in Craighead County in 2015, the county’s only PSAP handled more than 70,000 emergency calls. That same year, one of the six PSAPs in Lonoke County handled fewer than 3,000 calls.

 

Next Generation 911 will speed the routing of calls between the various local call centers.

 

Supporters of a new Next Generation 911 would like the legislature to authorize a single state agency to coordinate new technologies into a statewide network, so that the numerous separate local systems can connect more effectively.

 

They also would like an additional funding source. Phone users pay a charge on their monthly bills to support 911 services, but they generate only about half of the revenue needed to pay for the operating costs of the various systems in Arkansas. City and county governments pay for the remainder from local tax funds.

 

According to its supporters, other states are designating a state agency to implement Next Generation 911. They have saved money and increased efficiency by making a single state agency responsible, rather than waiting for numerous local systems to pay for adaptations to their systems.

 

8-10-18 9:32 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 8, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-8-18   1:20 p.m.     kawx.org

 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Don't Get Schooled by Credit Card Debt

ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Don’t Get Schooled by Credit Card Debt

 
LITTLE ROCK – Many young adults entering college or the workforce feel the pressure of looming bills and turn to credit cards to cover the initial costs but end up paying exorbitant rates long-term. Understanding that credit cards are not free and will only alleviate temporary financial burdens is an important concept for newly independent students. Accumulating credit card debt is avoidable; unfortunately, new users often fall victim to debt that hurts their ability to invest in personal pursuits like obtaining home loans and other financing in later years.
 
“Credit cards can be helpful but new users may not be fully aware of the costly terms and conditions,” says Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “Forgetting to make a payment or exceeding a card’s limit can be devastating to a consumer’s credit score, having a detrimental impact on long-term plans to buy a house or car.” 
 
As preventative strategies to young adults interested in applying for a credit card, Rutledge offers this advice when using a card:

  • Submit payments on time. Making regular payments is the best way to improve a credit score and qualify for less expensive credit.
  • Pay the whole balance owed if possible. Although it may seem easier to pay the minimum, doing so costs more in the long run, and it will take much longer to pay off the debt.
  • Do not “max out” a credit card. Charging the full credit limit is risky, and it will affect a consumer’s credit score.
  • Do not respond to every tempting credit card offer. Using too much credit could lead to having uncontrollable debt.
  • Read the fine print as some credit cards include expensive annual fees and higher interest rates in exchange for incentives like airline miles and bonus points. Some credit cards offer other services such as lower annual percentage rates, insurance and other items at no cost.

To protect college students from coercive credit card companies and debt, the Arkansas General Assembly enacted legislation in 1999 that restricts the practice of marketing credit cards on college campuses.
 
College students are further protected by the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act, which restricts the marketing of credit cards on campuses nationwide. The advertisement of credit card within 1,000 feet of a college campus or university event is prohibited. In addition, consumers under the age of 21 are required to include a parent’s signature, further binding the parent or guardian to repay debt incurred by the account. Credit card companies are also forbidden from using gifts as a form of persuasion to bribe younger consumers into applying for a card.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-8-18  1:12 p.m.  kawx.org

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Mena Schools To Give Away Gas Grill At Polk County Fair

 

Mena Schools is gearing up for the upcoming Polk County Fair for the week of August 27-September 1, 2018.  Vicky Maye, Parent/Family Engagement Coordinator for Mena Public Schools is pictured with Wal-Mart Associate, Etta Cottman with the gas grill that will be the big door prize for Mena Schools fair booth this year.  Maye states, "A big shout out to Wal-Mart for their continued support for this big event.  It's an exciting time of year for our community!  I love the ole saying that nothing makes you feel more like a kid than the county fair!  Our theme for our booth this year is focusing on the importance of schools, families and community being engaged as a team to educating the whole child as we strive to stay connected in keeping the heart in our homes, schools and community! We look forward to seeing you at our booth at the Polk County Fair!" 

 

8-8-18 10:46 a.m. kawx.org 

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Prayer Walk At Mena and Acorn Schools Sunday, August 12th

8-8-18 8:18 a.m. kawx.org 

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Mena Business, 113 Year Old Mena Landmark Destroyed By Fire

 

Mena Fire Department was paged out just after noon today to a structure fire on De Queen Street in Mena. Someone attempting to return shipping blankets to Sanders Moving and Storage noticed smoke coming from the two story building and reported it. When firemen first arrived there was only occasional smoke coming from the building. Entry was made through the front of the building, which was locked, and soon afterward large plumes of smoke started coming out of the structure, and eventually large flames consumed it. Firemen prevented the spread to nearby structures, but as a precaution a number of downtown businesses were evacuated. Several firemen were treated on the scene when they became overheated, one was taken to the local hospital for treatment. The heat index in Mena at 3:00 p.m. was 103°. Mena, Potter, Cherry Hill, Ink and Dallas Valley Fire Departments responded, as well as the Mena Police Department, Polk County Sheriff's Department, and Southwest EMS. The structure is a total loss and the cause of the fire is unknown and will be investigated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-7-18 8:18 p.m. kawx.org 

 

 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For July 30th thru August 5th

SHERIFF’S LOG
 
The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of July 30, 2018 – August 5, 2018. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.
 
July 30, 2018
Report from a Mena man of problems regarding child custody exchange. Report from complainant on Highway 375 East near Mena of a vehicle that was on fire. Deputy responded.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Jordan E. Hunter, 25, of Mena, on a Charge of DWI.
 
July 31, 2018
Report from complainant on Cemetary Road in Hatfield of a break-in and vandalism done to a building, totaling losses at $500.00. Investigation continues.
 
August 1, 2018
Report from complainant on Highway 8 East in Board Camp of the theft of a tow dolly, valued at $1,500.00. Investigation continues.
Arrested was James P. Obrien, 57, of Hatfield, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.
 
August 2, 2018
Report from complainant on Penny Lane near Mena of being scammed via social media, totaling losses at $1,235.41. The money was refunded by an internet pay service.
Arrested was Jonathan R. Spurkosky, 35, of Mena, on a Warrant for Rape.
 
August 3, 2018
Report from Polk County Road Department of a tractor that had been moved by an unauthorized person, causing damage to several road signs. Investigation continues.
Arrested was Jonathan M. Tidwell, 39, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Domestic Battery 3rd Degree.
Arrested was Kerry D. Johnson, 28, of Booneville, on Warrants for Probation Violation and Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Kymberlie A. Chaney, 21, of Mena, on Warrants for Probation Violation and Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
 
August 4, 2018
Report of trash being dumped along Polk 32 near Vandervoort. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a disturbance in the Polk County Detention Center. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Stone Lane near Acorn of being harassed by acquaintances. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Carissa A. Dowdy, 21, of Wickes, on a Warrant for Assault 3rd Degree.
 
August 5, 2018
Report from a Mena woman of problems regarding child custody exchange.
Report of a disturbance on Dover Street in Hatfield. Deputies responded. Complainant refused to press charges.
Report from complainant on James Gang Lane near Board Camp of an unauthorized person on their property. Deputy responded.
Report from complainant on Highway 375 East near Mena of an assault that had occurred in Oklahoma. All information was forwarded to the proper authorities.
Report of an assault on Polk 76 East near Mena. Deputies responded. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
 
Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked four vehicle accidents this week.
 
Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 19 Incarcerated Inmates, with 3 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.
 
PC18-00513
 
8-6-18 3:47 p.m. kawx.org 

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Arkansas Agriculture Department to Provide Livestock Market News Reporting

 

Arkansas Agriculture Department to Provide Livestock Market News Reporting

 

LITTLE ROCK, AR – The Arkansas Agriculture Department (AAD) has signed a cooperative agreement with the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) to serve as the state partner  for the Livestock Market News reporting program. Beginning August 1, AAD employees will collect data at livestock auctions across the state to be used by AMS to create daily and weekly reports for the cattle industry to measure local, state, and regional market trends. 

 

“The Arkansas Agriculture Department is proud to partner with the AMS to provide information that will help Arkansas cattlemen make informed marketing decisions based on reliable data,” says Arkansas Agriculture Secretary Wes Ward. “Livestock market news reporting is another way that we can equip our farmers and ranchers with the best available tools to help make their operations as competitive and profitable as possible.”

 

Daily and weekly market reports will be listed at the USDA website, here, and at the AAD website, here.   A voicemail update of the report will be available on August 1, 2018 by calling 501-823-1728.   An overview of the Arkansas Livestock Market News reporting program is available, here.

 

Livestock market news reporters will collect industry-specific data from five Arkansas livestock auctions in August and will add three additional auctions in September. The eight Arkansas livestock auctions with market reporters include Arkansas Cattle Auction Company, Searcy; Ash Flat Livestock Auctions, Ashflat; Benton County Sale Barn, Siloam Springs; County Line Sale Barn, Ratcliff; Hope Livestock Auction, Hope; North Arkansas Livestock Auction, Green Forest; and Ouachita Livestock Market, Ola; I-40 Livestock Auction, Ozark. Find a full list of all Arkansas livestock auctions, here.

 

“Livestock Auction Reports have been referenced for years by Arkansas cattlemen as a dependable, consistent source of information for local, regional, and state cattle prices,” said Cody Burkham, Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President. This is one of the most valuable resources of industry-specific information to our cattle families for herd growth and management, and we are pleased to see it continue in circulation through the partnership with the Arkansas Agriculture Department.”

 

The AAD previously hosted the Livestock Market News reporting program until the mid-1970s when the duties were transferred to the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service (UAEX). “The Cooperative Extension Service was glad to host it for the last 40 years as a service to our clients and it’s good to have it return to its original home,” said Dr. Vic Ford, Interim Associate Director-Agriculture and Natural Resources-Extension with UAEX.

 

With questions about the Livestock Market News reporting program, call James Ward at 501-823-1711.

 

8-6-18 2:58 p.m. kawx.org

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Lee Olin Cauthron Obituary

Lee Olin Cauthron

March 9, 1943 - August 4, 2018

 

Lee Olin Cauthron, age 75, of Mena, died Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the Mena Regional Health System. He was born on Tuesday, March 9, 1943 to Olin and Lela Beatrice Jordan Cauthron in Hatton, Arkansas.

Lee was a man of God, always willing to share his faith and reach the lost and point them to Christ. Lee was a Baptist by faith and loved the Lord. During Lee's working years he was a manager for Safeway Grocery Stores, Wal-Mart and Dollar General Stores over 30 plus years. Some of his hobbies were farming and raising his Mastiff and Yorkies. Lee will be missed by all who knew him.

He is preceded in death by his parents and his twin brother, James Cauthron.

Lee is survived by his son and daughter in law, Jeffrey and Dawn Cauthron of Augusta, Georgia; his daughter and son in law, Sherri and Dr. Bill McCourtney of Mena; two sisters, Margaret Qayyum of Glendale Heights, Illinois and Susan Morrison of Chicago, Illinois; nine grandchildren, Tabithia Cauthron of Grovetown, Georgia, Steven Cauthron of Camp Humphreys, South Korea; Logan and Emily McCourtney of Success, Arkansas, Blake McCourtney of Jonesboro, Arkansas, Dalton McCourtney, Nicholas McCourtney, Harlei McCourtney, Kolbi McCourtney and Raegan McCourtney all of Mena; three great grandchildren, Cadence Cauthron, Riley and Zoey McCourtney; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

Graveside services will be Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. at the Daniel Cemetery in Wickes with Brother Logan McCourtney officiating. Visitation will be Tuesday, August 7, 2018 from 6-8 P.M. at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena. Funeral Arrangements are entrusted to Bowser Family Funeral Home in Mena.

In lieu of flowers memorials can be made to The Oaks, 1341 Mena Street, Mena, AR 71953.

Online Guestbook: www.bowserffh.com

 

8-6-18 9:51 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Mena Police Department Report For July 29th - August 4th

 
Mena Police Department Reports for week of July 29, 2018 through August 4, 2018
 
July 29, 2018
Mikos Pierce, 18, of Mena was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct following a call to a local residence.
 
Joseph Cunningham, 32, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct and breaking or entering.  The arrest followed a follow-up investigation from information received regarding a vehicle stolen in Montgomery County.
 
July 30, 2018
Kristine Nichole Wootton, 34, of Mena was charged with prostitution and assault after officers investigated information received from multiple individuals concerning activities in which Ms. Wootton was involved.
 
Two 16-year-old Mena youths were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.  The case was referred to juvenile authorities.
 
July 31, 2018
A Mena woman reported the attempted break-in of a storage building on her property.  Case is under investigation.
 
Report was made of a purse being stolen from a local fast food restaurant.  Case is currently being investigated.
 
August 1, 2018
A local man reported that his dog had been attacked and injured by a neighbor’s dog.  Case is being investigated.
 
August 2, 2018
A Mena woman reported that someone had vandalized her vehicle by “keying” it.  No charges have been filed at this time.
 
Nick Kesterson, 19, of Cove was arrested on two outstanding warrants for failure to pay fines and court costs.
 
Randi Hall, 23, of Mena was arrested on a body attachment warrant from Polk County.
 
 
August 3, 2018
Daniel P. Schmidt, 53, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass, theft of property, resisting arrest, and fleeing.  The arrest followed a call to a local retail store.
 
Caleb John Chaquica, 36, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance.
 
Ashley Gail Smith, 26, Jim Justin Pearce, 40, both of Mena were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) after officers responded to a call from employees at a local retail store.
 
A former Mena resident reported that someone had gotten a telephone account in her name without her consent.  Case is pending.
 
David Sinyard, 42, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass and introducing prohibited articles.  The arrest followed a call to a local business.
 
Michael Wayne Creel, 31, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.
 
Gerald Todd Davis, 42, of Mena was charged with DWI and refusal to submit to chemical testing.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.
 
Derrick P. Lester, 43, of Mena was arrested on a warrant.
 
August 4, 2018
Report was made of a Mena resident being harassed and threatened by an acquaintance.  Case is pending location and interview of suspect.
 
Report was made of a missing teenage girl.  She was later located and returned to her parents' custody.
 
8-6-18 9:35 a.m. kawx.org 

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2018 Sales Tax Holiday This Weekend

 

Beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday August 4, 2018, and ending at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday August 5, 2018, the State of Arkansas will hold its sales tax holiday allowing shoppers the opportunity to

purchase certain School Supplies, School Art Supplies, School Instructional Materials, and clothing free of state and local sales or use tax.    

 

For more information, click anywhere on this line.

 

8-3-18 8:48 p.m. kawx.org 

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Term Limits Amendment Certified for the November Ballot

Today, Secretary of State Mark Martin certified petition signatures from a citizen’s group for term limits. The measure is slated for the November 2018 General Election ballot as Issue 3.  
 
In a letter last March, I said that the term limits amendment being proposed for the ballot this November would put Arkansas’ term limits law back to the way things were prior to the passage of a law that extended legislative terms in 2014.  I wrote that letter when my understanding of the current proposed term limits amendment was incomplete.  Here is what I have learned about the proposed term limits amendment.
 
This year’s term limits amendment differs from the term limits law that was in place from 1992 to 2014 in the following ways.

 

  1. Similar to the old term limits law, it allows people to serve 6 years in the Arkansas House or 8 years in the Arkansas Senate.  It differs from the old law, because it limits a person’s total years of service in the legislature to no more than 10 years.  This means that a person could serve 6 years in the House and 4 years in the Senate.  They could serve 8 years in the Senate and 2 years in the House.  They could serve any combination that totaled 10 years or less.  
     
  2. The amendment also adds a provision prohibiting the legislature from doing what they did in 2014, which was to propose legislation giving themselves more years in office.  Under the new amendment, the legislature is prohibited from making any changes to the term limits amendment or referring any changes to a vote of the people.  The people would still be able to circulate petitions and place any change or repeal of the amendment on the ballot.

 
In 2014, the Arkansas Legislature proposed a constitutional amendment extending the total number of years they could serve to 16 years, with the possibility of serving all of that time in one house. That same amendment contained ethics provisions designed to prohibit gifts from lobbyists, and it established processes for setting lawmakers' salaries. 
 
The measure was widely criticized because many voters did not understand the nature of the amendment based on its popular name that appeared on the ballot.  It was listed on the ballot as “The Arkansas Elected Officials Ethics, Transparency, and Financial Reform Amendment of 2014.” Many voters did not know that the measure increased the number of terms lawmakers could serve or that it would affect lawmakers' salaries.  The 2014 measure passed with 53% of the vote.  This year’s proposed term limits amendment does not affect lawmaker’s salaries or the provisions regarding gifts to lawmakers. 
 
After proposed ballot measures are certified by the Secretary of State, they can be challenged in court for deficiencies in the ballot title or improper gathering of signatures.  If enough deficiencies are found, the Arkansas Supreme Court could order the measure removed from the ballot or issue an order that votes on the measure not be counted.  So far, no challenges have been filed in court.

 

 

Jerry Cox

Family Council

414 S. Pulaski
Suite 2
Little RockAR 72201
(501) 375-7000
 
8-3-18 8:16 p.m. kawx.org 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address - Two Big Events for One Important Topic

 
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – This week, two events in my schedule overlapped in a way that we didn’t plan but presented me the opportunity to emphasize the importance of job skill training centers in Arkansas.
 
On Wednesday, I was in Springdale to announce that the state is allocating one million dollars over two years to the Northwest Technical Institute, a two-year technical school in Springdale. The money is to cover one-third of the cost for Northwest Technical Institute to expand its training program in ammonia refrigeration, industrial maintenance, and boiler operation.
 
Ammonia refrigeration is a high-demand occupation in Northwest Arkansas and across the state, where many companies use large-scale refrigeration systems. NWTI is expanding its program after Tyson executives asked the school for help to address its shortage of certified technicians to handle the work in their plants.
 
Tyson was having to send its employees out of state to train because we did not have the capacity in Arkansas to train enough technicians in the maintenance and repair of ammonia refrigerators.
A shortage of qualified employees isn’t limited to the poultry industry. Leaders in other industries have sought help in finding welders, HVAC technicians, diesel-engine mechanics and other occupations that require certification or a license. Our technical training centers and our high schools across Arkansas are helping to fill that gap.
 
The technical training is an essential opportunity in our education system. College may not be the best option for everyone. At technical centers, high school graduates and even students still in high school can learn a trade. A high school student may be ready to test and go to work as soon as he or she graduates.
 
When I took office, 54 school districts didn’t have a technical training center. When school opens this fall, the number of unserved districts will be down to 17.
 
My trip to NWTI to announce the assistance for ammonia refrigeration had been on the schedule for a long time.
 
The overlapping event I mentioned came as an unexpected invitation from President Trump to join him at the White House on Tuesday. The president was going to sign a bill that allocates money to states to support technical-education programs, such as the ones at NWTI.
 
In the private ceremony, the president signed a bill reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, which increases access to high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE) programs.
 
So two days in a row, in ceremonies in Washington and in Springdale, I had the unplanned privilege of participating in two ceremonies that gave me back-to-back opportunities to deliver the message that technical and job skill training is necessary to build a skilled workforce across our nation.
 
Ammonia refrigeration, by the way, is different than cooling systems that use Freon. Ammonia is more efficient and cools faster, but it is less stable and requires careful handling. Not just any refrigerator expert can work on an ammonia system, which partly explains why the industry has come up short on technicians.
 
But private industry has partnered with the state, and next summer, a class of newly certified technicians will show up to fill the jobs.
 
8-3-18 8:02 p.m. kawx.org

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

Out of every 100,000 Arkansans, 14 will die from a drug overdose. If this trend continues, the drug overdose death rate may surpass the motor vehicle death rate, which was 20 per 100,000 in 2016.

 

In short, drug overdoses are killing us. Nearly 116 Americans die each day from an overdose of a legal opioid prescription pain killer or a lethal dose of illegal heroin.

 

The young age at which many drug overdoses occur increases the burden these deaths place on our communities. Between 2014 and 2016, the average age of a drug overdose decedent was 43 years. During the same time period, the average age at death from all causes was 71, which means that overdoses shortened many people’s lives by close to three decades The issue is complex, baffling, and heart-breaking.

 

In the 2019 Drug Threat Assessment Report from the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), methamphetamine is cited as our state’s most significant drug threat.  The use of pharmaceutical drugs like Oxycontin and Hydrocodone continues to increase posing another significant threat.  And now heroin use is slowly but inexorably increasing.

 

According to the report, the continued growth of heroin appears to be a direct result of the abuse of pharmaceutical drugs, whose abusers transition to the drug due to the price and availability.  Adding to the already increasing concerns of the drugs dangers, law enforcement is finding that half of all heroin confiscated in the state is laced with fentanyl.

 

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid. It is 30-50 times more potent than heroin and 50-100 times more potent than morphine.

 

Arkansas is certainly not alone in this struggle.  In fact, just this week at the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), legislators from around the country shared what their government is doing to combat this growing epidemic.  We will continue to study effective policies in other states to determine what legislation may be needed in 2019.

 

In the last session, we passed Act 284. This allows pharmacists in Arkansas to order, dispense and/or administer naloxone without a prescription. It provides greater access to more Arkansans and first responders in the event of a drug overdose.

 

In 2018 alone, law enforcement agencies have administered naloxone 68 times to overdose patients.

 

There are positive developments when it comes to our state’s battle with drug use.  In the last 5 years, drug abuse rates among our youth has declined every year.  We look forward to seeing this rate decline.

 

If you or a family member is struggling with addiction, we encourage you to visit www.artakeback.org.  This site has valuable information on opioid addiction and links to treatment centers across the state.

 

8-3-18 3:39 p.m. kawx.org 

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Help End Abortion in Arkansas

 

This September pro-life Arkansans will gather for peaceful prayer outside abortion facilities.

 

The prayer vigils are part of the 40 Days for Life campaign.

 

All across the country, Americans will join together praying that abortion will end.

 

40 Days for Life will begin in less than two months on September 26, and it will last until November 4. Volunteers will take turns praying outside abortion facilities from 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM throughout the day.

 

Leaders are looking for churches who will each recruit enough volunteers to cover one or more days during the 40 days. Typically, a volunteer will pray for only one hour outside the abortion facility, so it takes at least 12 volunteers to cover an entire day.

 

These gatherings are not rallies or protests. They are peaceful assemblies for prayer and reflection — and they work.

 

Every year we hear stories from other states of abortion clinics shut down and abortion workers coming to Christ in the wake of a 40 Days for Life prayer campaign. We want Arkansas to be next.

 

This is your opportunity to help us end abortion, and all you have to do is pray.

 

People in central Arkansas can learn more about 40 Days for Life by contacting Toni Blackwell at 501-650-2993 or 40DaysForLifeLittleRock@gmail.com.

 

In Northwest Arkansas, you can learn more about 40 Days for Life by contacting Sheila Pursell at 469-231-1959 or 40DaysNWA@gmail.com.

 

8-3-18 9:41 a.m. kawx.org

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague - "Flashing Red. Kids Ahead."

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

August 3, 2018

 

LITTLE ROCK – Educators and traffic safety officials have expanded their annual campaign to alert motorists that students are returning to school, so everyone should be more careful driving because children are again getting on and off school buses every day.

 

This is the sixth year of the campaign, called “Flashing Red. Kids Ahead.” In the past it has lasted three weeks, and this year school officials, police departments and civic leaders will promote school bus safety for the entire month of August.

 

It’s little wonder that commuters notice the absence of students in summer and their reappearance in August. In Arkansas 350,000 students ride 7,000 buses every school day.

 

Transportation officials at the state Education Department promote school bus safety all through the year.

 

As part of their continuing efforts to enhance school bus safety, they conducted a survey of 3,200 bus drivers in April. On a single day, they reported 850 instances of a motor vehicle illegally passing a bus that was stopped to pick up or drop off children.

 

In 2005 the legislature strengthened the penalties for passing a stopped school bus that has its red lights flashing to indicate children are getting on or off. The enhanced penalties are in Act 2128 of 2005, which is titled Isaac’s Law in memory of a nine-year-old from Benton who was killed by a passing motorist after he had got off a school bus.

 

Since 2011, after the legislature approved Act 37, it has been illegal to use a cell phone while driving through a school zone. Act 37 also prohibits the use of a cell phone while driving through a construction zone while workers are present.

 

In 2009 Arkansas joined a long list of states that prohibit text messaging while behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. Previous laws had prohibited teenaged drivers from texting, but Act 181 of 2009 prohibits all drivers from texting.

 

That year the State Police worked 787 traffic accidents in which drivers were distracted by cell phones. Federal transportation officials say driver distraction is a factor in 16 percent of fatal crashes.

 

The State Police joined a nationwide safety campaign in April meant to prevent driving while distracted. It was called “"U Drive – U Text – U Pay."

 

In 2016, distracted drivers caused traffic accidents that killed 3,450 people in the United States.

 

Reading and sending text messages are not the only distractions that endanger motorists. Talking on a phone or using it to search the Internet is a distraction. So is eating, drinking or smoking. Talking to other people in your vehicle can create distractions. Adjusting the navigation system, turning on music or changing radio stations are also common distractions.

 

In September, police and traffic safety officials will conduct a child safety campaign, aimed at teaching adults to make sure that children in the car are always properly buckled up in an appropriate booster seat. That will be followed by Teen Driver Safety Week in October.

 

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for American teens aged 15 to 18. The discouraging news is that in 2016, when the most recent statistics were compiled, the number of teen deaths from car crashes went up by six percent over 2015.

 

8-3-18 9:32 a.m. kawx.org 

 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column - Delivering Resources to Prepare Arkansas's Workforce for 21st Century Jobs

Delivering Resources to Prepare Arkansas’s Workforce for 21st Century Jobs

 

As the summer draws to a close, students and workers alike will experience a renewed focus on the development of workforce-readiness skills with teachers and industry leaders working to create a job-ready and career-bound workforce. Arkansas is eager to continue building a strong foundation to meet the needs of modern businesses. Recent efforts in Congress will help advance this effort even further.  

 

Communities across Arkansas have been ready to welcome new workers to meet the demands of local manufacturers and industry. In recent years, Arkansas has implemented measures to identify the skills necessary to fill these roles. It has become clear that tailored educational programs and occupational skills training are essential to hardworking Arkansans’ ability to thrive. 

 

This is happening in the classroom where traditional coursework like computer science equips students with the skills needed to meet the demands of 21st century employers. Universities, along with vocational and technical schools across Arkansas, are collaborating with local businesses to advance local economic interests and help create innovative curricula to match the needs in the community and region. Initiatives like the Associated Industries of Arkansas Foundation’s Be Pro Be Proud were launched in response to the need for highly-skilled labor for businesses and manufacturers across the state that require specialized training, not a traditional four-year degree.

 

Career and technical education is increasingly important to Arkansas. State officials say it is part of the key to prosperity in the Natural State’s future. A wide range of interests from education to industry have repeatedly requested for Congress to modernize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act to help support students and adults going back to school to gain the education and training they need to find high-skill, high-wage or in-demand jobs. In July, with my support, Congress passed the reauthorization of CTE funding and the president signed it into law.

 

This is the first reauthorization of Perkins CTE in more than a decade. It makes important updates to the law that funds career and technical education programs. We made reforms to limit the role of the federal Department of Education, an important step that will provide states with greater authority to determine the best ways to help their students learn and workers remain competitive. This flexibility strengthens Arkansas’s control over its goals and programs to best prepare and develop its workforce.

 

States and local school districts will have more freedom to spend the limited program dollars they receive to benefit students rather than on complying with expensive and burdensome federal reporting requirements. 

 

Providing resources for workforce education is vital to the economic growth and prosperity of Arkansas. Training students and workers to learn technical skills or a trade will help fill well-paying jobs today and in the future.

 

8-3-18 9:26 a.m. kawx.org 

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Arkansas Highway Police Searching for Officers to Fill Ranks

LITTLE ROCK– Arkansas Highway Police began accepting applications for law enforcement officers and will fill vacancies throughout the State.

 

Arkansas Highway Police (AHP) is a Division of the Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT). AHP is a nationally recognized leader in the fields of drug interdiction, motor carrier safety and hazardous materials enforcement, and training. Officers serve as instructors for the Criminal Justice Institute, National Training Center, Transportation Safety Institute, and the Drug Interdiction Assistance Program.

 

Arkansas Highway Police are responsible for the enforcement of state laws regulating the use of public highways with special emphasis on commercial vehicles and private non-passenger transportation vehicles. Officers maintain expertise in size, weight, hazardous materials, license, tax, traffic and criminal law enforcement, and motor carrier safety.

 

The annual starting salary is $40,300. Officers already certified through the Arkansas Commission on Law Enforcement Standards and Training (ACLEST) begin at $42,328, annually. Benefits of working for AHP include annual and sick leave, group healthcare and life insurance plans, Arkansas State Highway Employees Retirement System, and uniform and special expense allowances.

Applications can be submitted by visiting www.ardot.gov. Select the “Employment” tab and then choose, “All Other Applicants.”

 

ARDOT complies with all civil rights provisions of federal statutes and related authorities that prohibit discrimination in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. Therefore, the Department does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, age, national origin, religion (not applicable as a protected group under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Title VI Program), disability, Limited English Proficiency (LEP), or low-income status in the admission, access to and treatment in the Department's programs and activities, as well as the Department's hiring or employment practices.

 

8-2-18 9:23 a.m. kawx.org

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Preparation can Lower the Cost of Expensive Back-to-School Shopping

LITTLE ROCK – Parents across Arkansas have been gearing up and saving money for back-to-school shopping, but supplies and clothes can be expensive, especially if parents do not take the time to price shop. From school supplies, to new gadgets and clothes, money quickly adds up.
 
“Back-to-school shopping can be stressful and financially straining for Arkansans,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “But taking the time to compare prices, taking advantage of the best deals and only buying the necessities can save a lot of money.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following tips for parents who are back-to-school shopping:

 

  • Stick to the teacher-approved school supply list. Do not waste time and money on unlisted, impulse items that may never be used.
  • Research prices ahead of time. Use price comparison apps or websites to check best available prices in real time. Or shop end-of-summer sales. Also consider that many stores will price-match better deals from other retailers.
  • Check school supply deals at supermarkets and scope out the office supply items before going to the back-to-school section. More items could be in stock for a better price.
  • For larger, more expensive items like sports equipment, electronics or musical instruments, consider buying used or refurbished.
  • Ask about and understand a store’s return policy, and recognize sometimes a box cannot be returned once it is opened.
  • If shopping online, only purchase items on a secure website. Determine whether a website is secure by looking for a “lock” icon in a browser’s status bar and the letters “https” at the start of the website’s URL.
  • Consider paying for online purchases with a credit card. Consumers are allowed under federal law to dispute those charges and cardholders may have no liability if a card is stolen fraudulently and used.

 
Some providers and companies offer student discounts on wireless service, cell phones, tablets and other electronics. Check with the provider to determine available discounts.
 
Arkansas’s sales tax holiday, which suspends state and local tax on certain school supplies and clothing, is Aug. 4 and 5.
 
According to the National Retail Federation, families spent nearly $84 billion in back-to-school and back-to-college spending last year. Meanwhile, they estimate $685 in spending per child in grades K-12.
 
For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

8-2-18 9:07 a.m. kawx.org 

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Weekly Fishing Report

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for Aug. 1, 2018. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Click on the area below that you are interetsed in.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality

 

8-1-18 3:40 p.m. kawx.org 

 

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