KAWX News

Polk County Sheriff's Log for January 30th - February 5th

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 30, 2023 – February 5, 2023. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 30, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 414 near Hatfield in reference to a Verbal Domestic Disturbance leading to the arrest of Nancy Odle, 38 of Cove on a charge of Public Intoxication and Richard Cheshire, 60 of Mena on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant and a Felony Warrant for Possession of a Controlled Substance.

Deputies responded to a report of a break-in on Polk 168 near Hatfield.

An encounter on Hwy 71 near Hatfield led to the arrest of Leon Jordan on a Felony Warrant

 

January 31, 2023

Jerry Hopper, 46 of Cove was arrested on a Felony Warrant for 2nd Degree Murder, Kidnapping, Abuse of a Corpse, Tampering with Physical Evidence and Fraudulent Use of a Communications Device.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 76 E near Mena in reference to a Domestic Dispute. Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney for further consideration.

 

February 1, 2023

Deputies responded to a residence on Polk 111 near Acorn in reference to an unattended death.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Hwy 71 S near Mena for a welfare check.

 

February 2, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Hwy 71 S near Cove leading to the arrest of Joshua House, 22 of Cove on a charge of Disorderly Conduct.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Hwy 8 W near Mena in reference to an unattended death.

 

February 3, 2023

Veronica Smith, 44 of Cove was arrested by an officer with Probation and Parole on charges of Possession of a Firearm by Certain Persons, Possession of a Schedule I or II Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and a Misdemeanor Failure to Appear Warrant.

 

February 4, 2023

Deputies responded to a residence on April Lane near Wickes in reference to a death.

 

February 5, 2023

Deputies responded to the jail in reference to a combative inmate leading to Andrew Stewart, 22 of Alaska being charged with 1st Degree Criminal Mischief.

Deputies responded to a residence on Polk 20 West near Cove in reference to a stolen UTV.

Britney Watts, 24 of Mena was arrested on two Felony Warrants for Failure to Appear as well as a Felony Warrant for Possession of Methamphetamine or Cocaine with Purpose to Deliver, Possession of a Controlled Substance and two Felony Warrants for Possession of a Schedule I or II Controlled Substance.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 302 near Cherry Hill in reference to a domestic disturbance. Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney for further consideration.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 2 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 25 Incarcerated Inmates with 16 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

2-6-23 3:51 P.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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Mena Police Report for January 29th - February 4th

Mena Police Department reports for the week of January 29th through February 4th, 2023

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

January 29

A report of theft was taken at James’ Food.

 

Rachael Crow, 42, was served with a warrant at the county jail.

 

Bobby May, 35, was served with a warrant on Pickering Avenue.

 

January 30

A report of financial identity fraud was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

February 1

A report of theft of motor fuel was taken at The Corner.

 

February 2

A report of theft of property was taken from Walmart.

 

February 3

Bradley Brumfield, 32, was served with warrants on Bethesda Road.

 

A report of criminal mischief was taken from The Corner.

 

February 4

No report.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

2-6-23 8:54 A.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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Masterpiece Ministries Serving West Central Arkansas, Boutique Opening in Mena

Masterpiece Ministries of Arkansas, a 501 c3 non-profit organization, is a local ministry to women struggling with addiction. What began as the dream of a small-town Pastor after tuning into a Christian radio program, has turned into a soon to be completed residential home for up to sixteen women in Pencil Bluff, AR.  

 

The organization was founded in early 2020 right as the pandemic began. Prior to the organization’s founding, a group of community leaders, pastors and other concerned citizens gathered to pray and hear more about establishing a Christ-centered transformation home for women in West Central Arkansas. The need is great, as Arkansas is ranked No. #1 for methamphetamine use in the nation, and there are no long-term residential homes in the area to help rehabilitate women. 

 

God answered the prayers of His people with the formation of MMOA which has been able to minister to women since its inception. MMOA is affiliated with We Can Ministries which supports a network of 12 other Christ-centered homes for men and women across Arkansas. This partnership has not only helped MMOA establish a solid foundation, giving it direction and assistance, but is able to aid in finding placement for women who are seeking help now to be set free from the bondage of addiction.  

 

God has also opened a door of opportunity for MMOA to have a one-of-a-kind resale boutique in Mena, AR to help financially support the home along with gifts from individual donors and churches. Redeemed Boutique will have a Winter Sale as a soft opening this Friday and Saturday, February 10th and 11th,  from 9:00 AM-5:00 PM.  

 

The boutique is located next to Arvest Bank at 1510 Hwy 71 North and is housed in part of the old Mountain Gun and Pawn Shop. Beginning February 13th, the boutique will be open Monday through Friday from 12:30-5:30 PM. Nancy Lewis, Store Manager, is thrilled to have the opportunity to serve in ministry to women who are in addiction while using her skills to operate the store and connect the community with the ministry.   

 

Redeemed Boutique has a selection of new and gently used men’s, women’s and children’s clothing, shoes, home goods, furniture and more! The Boutique and Vintage sections offer higher-end designer brands at great prices. 100% of sales contribute to the mission of helping women break the bondage of addiction and build communities that strengthen women and support families as they reclaim their sobriety and live restored and redeemed lives in Christ. In addition to offering quality items in the store, Redeemed Boutique will serve as a vocational training site for our residents. Volunteers and women in our Phase 2 program will help staff the store 5 days a week under the supervision of the store manager. It will also be a place of ministry where women can go for help, learn how to enter the one-year residential program, and participate in Bible studies and take addiction related courses. 

 

MMOA strives to help women break the cycle of addiction through the love and gospel of Jesus Christ. They desire to see women who are addicted to drugs and/or alcohol become rehabilitated and live productive God honoring lives. 

 

For more information about Masterpiece Ministries of Arkansas and Redeemed Boutique, go to MMOAR.org, follow them on Facebook and Instagram @masterpieceministriesar or call 870-490-1418. 

 

2-6-23 7:32 A.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

In the 4th week of the 2023 Regular Session, the House passed bills impacting taxes, healthcare, education, and criminal justice.

 

Tax related bills that passed the House this week included HB1026 and HB1143.

 

HB1026 prohibits local governments from enacting an income tax.

 

HB1143 defines “homestead” for purposes of property tax exemption for disabled veterans, surviving spouses, and minor dependent children of disabled veterans.

 

The House also passed HB1127 which creates the Rural Emergency Hospital Act. This bill would provide a way for rural hospitals in the state to qualify for a new federal designation and be reimbursed at a higher rate for outpatient services.

 

Other healthcare related bills now advancing to the Senate include HB1042, HB1082, and HB1267.

 

HB1042 enhances coverage of prostate cancer screenings by directing the Insurance Commissioner to adopt any updated guidelines published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

 

HB1082 establishes the Occupational Therapy Licensure Compact in Arkansas.

 

HB1267 requires home caregivers to have a specific number of hours in dementia training. 

 

On Wednesday of this week, the House passed three education bills.

 

HB1238 outlines enhanced transportation funding for school districts.

 

HB1156 states that public schools and open-enrollment public charter schools shall designate multiple occupancy restrooms for exclusive use by the male sex or exclusive use by the female sex.

 

HB1157 states that every public school and open-enrollment charter school shall provide parents with digital or hard copy information about local water safety education courses and swimming lessons offered for free or at a reduced price.

 

In addition, the House passed bills addressing criminal justice issues.

 

HB1004 amends the Sex Offender Registration Act by requiring the physical address of the sex offender, including the house or apartment number, to be made public. Currently, only the street name and block number are required.

 

HB1208 limits the time period during which restricted driving permits are valid for those on probation or parole to one year from the date it was issued.

 

We will continue to update you on the legislation advancing during the session. You can watch all committee meetings and House floor proceedings at arkansashouse.org.

 

2-3-23 4:44 P.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column: Creating a Pipeline of VA Health Professionals

Creating a Pipeline of VA Health Professionals

 

I’ve been honored to serve on the Senate and House Veterans’ Affairs Committees to help craft policies designed to fulfill the promise we made to the men and women who served in our nation’s uniform by expanding access to Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care, benefits and services. This responsibility also means ensuring we have qualified personnel across VA clinics to carry out this sacred task. We’ve taken important steps in recent months to bolster the VA’s workforce and we’re continuing to build on this foundation in the 118th Congress. 

 

As I visit with VA personnel across Arkansas, they frequently describe the persistent challenges with filling critical roles to provide care to veterans. Unfortunately, this is a problem nationwide. The VA’s Office of Inspector General found “severe occupational staffing shortages” increased by 22 percent in Fiscal Year 2022 from the previous year.

 

It’s critical for the VA to always have the staff and leadership necessary to meet the needs of veterans no matter where they live. We’re working to enhance its ability to retain and recruit employees with new tools and resources to fulfill its mission.

 

Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee Chairman Jon Tester (D-MT) and I have partnered to introduce the VA Clinician Appreciation, Recruitment, Education, Expansion, and Retention Support (CAREERS) Act, legislation that would invest in VA personnel. Our plan would ensure the VA can retain and recruit physicians, nurses and other medical professionals in addition to employees who process benefits claims and others who support and care for our veterans.

 

We also included a provision in the VA CAREERS Act to address VA Medical Center leadership vacancies and ensure the position of director is filled in a timely manner. The Fayetteville VA Medical Center (VAMC) was without a permanent director for nearly two years and only last month was someone new assigned to this role. This measure would make sure a plan is in place to fill this position within 180 days of a director being given a new VA assignment, which is particularly important given how essential directors are in overseeing the care of veterans at these facilities.

 

We’re gaining support for this initiative. In recent days Congressman Steve Womack also introduced a bill in the House of Representatives to limit the time VAMCs are without a permanent director.

 

The VA CAREERS Act accelerates the progress we made last year to grow the VA workforce. In August, Congress approved, and the president signed into law, the PACT Act to deliver toxic-exposed veterans their earned care and benefits. In the months following, the VA Secretary confirmed nearly 200,000 veterans have filed PACT Act-related claims making it even more imperative the Department has adequate staffing to manage the expanded eligibility. 

 

In anticipation of an increase in claims, the PACT Act also included a number of measures to expand hiring and retention at the VA, especially in rural areas, as well as set higher pay caps for certain health professionals in order to remain competitive with the private sector.

 

We’re proud to build on this momentum with the VA CAREERS Act so medical professionals are enticed to begin and extend their careers serving veterans in rural communities and delivering the benefits and care these men and women have earned.

 

2-3-23 3:53 P.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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US Congressman Bruce Westerman's Weekly Column

Welcoming Brittany Alkonis to Washington D.C.

 

Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution requires the President of the United States to “give to the Congress Information on the State of the Union and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” Since 1913, this annual event has been called the State of the Union Address, and on February 7th, President Joe Biden will come to the Capitol and deliver his second State of the Union Address to me and my colleagues.

 

Every year, each member of Congress is allowed to invite one guest to attend the speech in person. This year, I am pleased that Mrs. Brittany Alkonis will be joining me for this historic occasion. Brittany is the loving wife of U.S. Navy Lieutenant Ridge Alkonis, who has been unnecessarily imprisoned by the Japanese government.

 

In 2021, while stationed in Japan, Ridge was driving down a mountain road with Brittany and their children from a trip to Mount Fuji when he experienced a horrible case of altitude sickness that caused him to lose consciousness at the wheel, leading to a tragic and unfortunate accidental car crash that left two Japanese citizens dead. Sadly, because the authorities in Japan did not provide him with appropriate medical treatment following the crash, which could have diagnosed his illness, the Japanese court sentenced Ridge to three years in prison.

 

I learned of Ridge’s story from a friend of mine, whom I served alongside in the Arkansas House of Representatives. His family has close ties to the Alkonis family and is working together with many of Ridge’s supporters to bring him home. The relentless advocacy of those fighting for justice for Ridge caught my attention and that of many of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the House and Senate. Members of Congress who normally have little occasion to work together have found we are pulling in the same direction for the Alkonis family. I say this to emphasize the power one individual can have in making a difference and to emphasize the need for President Biden’s support in this fight to bring Ridge home.

 

This story is tragic and goes to show the importance of supporting our military families serving overseas. Those who are brave enough to sacrifice so much to serve our country deserve the utmost respect and always be supported by the Pentagon, the White House, and Congress.

 

I am humbled to have the opportunity to welcome Brittany to the U.S. Capitol and to hear her and her husband’s story firsthand. I will continue to pray for the safety of Ridge, and for peace for his family while we continue to advocate for his quick release.

 

2-3-23 2:00 P.M. KAWX.ORG

 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Terry Rice

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Terry Rice

February 3, 2023

 

LITTLE ROCK – The Senate Committee on Public Health, Welfare and Labor endorsed legislation to repeal language in state law allowing medical facilities to be licensed in order to perform abortions.

 

Senate Bill 138 is what legislators call a clean-up bill. Usually, such bills merely correct typographical errors in state regulations or they update obsolete language.

 

But SB 38 is not like other clean-up bills because it is enormously symbolic.

 

Last year in a case out of Mississippi the U.S. Supreme court repealed Roe v. Wade, a precedent that allowed abortions. Arkansas had in place a “trigger” law, Act 180 of 2019. It immediately outlawed abortions except to save the life of the mother and now Arkansas is considered one of the most pro-life states in the country.

 

Prior to the Supreme Court ruling, laws passed by the Arkansas legislature to restrict abortions were tied up or overturned in federal court. That allowed facilities in Arkansas to perform abortions because federal law superseded state laws. The state Health Department used to license those facilities.

 

However, now that Act 180 is in effect there is no need for language licensing abortion facilities. SB 138 recognizes that fact.

After committee approval, the next step is for SB 138 to be voted on by the entire Senate and sent to the House of Representatives.

 

In other action, the full Senate unanimously approved SB 66 to require Internet sites to verify the age of viewers if the sites are harmful to minors due to the availability of pornographic material. The required age verification could be a digital ID, such as a driver’s license.

 

Web sites that fail to verify the age of viewers would be liable for harm done to minors. Also, the adult sites would not be allowed to keep information, but would have to immediately dispose of personal information obtained from adults. If the sites keep identifying information of adults they would be liable for damages, court costs and attorneys’ fees.

 

The Senate sent SB 66 to the House.

 

The Senate also approved legislation that allows a city to create an entertainment district without having an advertising and promotion tax. They are commonly known as “hamburger” taxes, and current law does not allow entertainment districts in cities without them.

 

The legislation is House Bill 1024. It has already been approved by the House, where it originated, and now will be sent to the governor for her signature.

 

Another bill that has been approved by both chambers and awaits the governor’s signature is HB 1123, to allow someone who has voluntarily sought mental health treatment to apply for a concealed carry permit. The person would have to wait two years after completing treatment and then could file a petition in circuit court.

 

A bill to categorize drag shows as adult entertainment is progressing, although with amendments. The Senate approved SB 43, but a House committee changed it to further define adult oriented businesses.

 

SB 43 would restrict where drag shows could be performed, because adult entertainment such as strip clubs are restricted. For example, they cannot be held on public property and minors may not attend.

 

The Senate must agree to the changes adopted in the House before SB 43 is sent to the governor.

 

2-3-23 9:51 A.M. KAWX.ORG


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Jerry Hopper arraigned in Polk County Circuit Court on charges including Second Degree Murder

Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer released the follow today concerning the arraignment of Jerry Hopper of Cove on multiple charges, including Second Degree Murder.

 

 

"Jerry Hopper, age 46, of Cove, Arkansas was arraigned in the Polk County Circuit Court on the following charges:

 
Count 1-Murder in the 2nd degree
 
Count 2-Kidnapping
 
Count 3-Abuse of a corpse
 
Count 4-Tampering with Evidence
 
Count 5-Use of a communication device during the commission of a felony.
 
The charges are related to the disappearance and murder of Erin “Pepper” Lawrence.
 
Erin Lawrence was reported missing in April of 2020.
 
On September 8, 2022, an inmate in the Polk County Detention Center took the Polk County Sheriff’s Office to a shallow grave in a heavily wooded area west of Hatfield, Arkansas. Investigators with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and the Arkansas State Police processed the scene and recovered human remains.
 
On September 6, 2022, the Arkansas State Crime Lab confirmed the remains were in fact Erin Lawrence.
 
Jerry Hopper, who is currently an inmate in the Arkansas Department of Corrections, was transported back to Polk County to be arraigned on the new charges.
 
All suspects are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law."
 
The article from September 6, 2022 when Erin “Pepper” Lawrence's body was identified can be read here.
 
2-1-23 6:35 P.M. KAWX.ORG
 
 

Polk County Sheriff's Log for January 23rd - 29th

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 23, 2023 – January 29, 2023. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 23, 2023

Deputies responded to a walk-in complainant in reference to theft of property.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Hidden Lane near Mena in reference to a domestic altercation.

 

January 24, 2023

Michael Thompson, 41 of Hatfield was arrested on four Felony Failure to Appear Warrants, a Body Attachment and to be held for another agency.

While patrolling, deputies located an abandoned vehicle in the ditch on Hwy 88 E leading to a citation being issued to Christopher Chesser for leaving the scene of an accident.

Steve Hedrick, 55 of Wickes was arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department on a Body Attachment Warrant.

 

January 25, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a vehicle fire on Hwy 8 E near Mena.

Deputies responded to a residence on Polk 97 near Acorn in reference to a burglary.

 

January 26, 2023

Michael Thomas, 36 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance with Purpose to Deliver.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Dover Street near Hatfield in reference to an altercation. Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney for further consideration.

 

January 27, 2023

No reports.

 

January 28, 2023

No reports.

 

January 29, 2023

Leon Jordan, 36 of Hatfield was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of a Controlled Substance.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 1 vehicle accident this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 27 Incarcerated Inmates with 20 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

1-30-23 10:30 A.M. KAWX.ORG

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Mena Police Report for January 22nd - 28th

Mena Police Department Reports for the week of January 22nd through January 28th, 2023

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

January 22

Dillion Turner, 24, was charged with Public Intoxication and Obstruction of Government Operations at EZ Mart.

 

Dare Garrison, 28, was served with a warrant at the county jail.

 

Dawnylle Boutwell, 53, was served with a warrant after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

January 23

A report of unauthorized use of a vehicle was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Tabitha Ferguson, 37, was served with a warrant after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

January 24

Martin Rodriguez, 21, was charged with Disorderly Conduct, Harassment, Public Intoxication, Possession of Open Container in a Motor Vehicle, and Carrying a Weapon after a disturbance call at Dollar Tree.

 

January 25

No report.

 

January 26

No report.

 

January 27

Landon Ragain, 18, was charged with Possession of Marijuana and Speeding after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

A report of theft was taken from Walmart.

 

A report of forgery was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 28

Matresa Stokes, 39, was charged with DWI, Violation of Ignition Interlock Device, and Speeding after a traffic stop on Reine Street.

 

Rocquel Priser, 43, was charged with Theft of Property at Walmart.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-30-23 9:45 A.M. KAWX.ORG

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

On the third week of the 2023 Regular Session, the House passed legislation that could impact everything from car tags to the start of the school year.

 

HB1150 which would extend the time period Arkansans have to register a vehicle. This bill would give Arkansans 60 days from the purchase date of the car or if they’ve moved to Arkansas from out of state. Currently, Arkansans have 30 days to register.

 

The House also passed HB1125 which prohibits level 3 and level 4 sex offenders from owning or operating a drone.

 

In addition, the House passed HB1091. This bill states that for purposes of employment in Arkansas, a GED shall be treated the same as a high school diploma.

 

Other bills making their way to the Senate now include HB1123. This bill would allow an individual who voluntarily seeks mental health treatment in a mental health institution or facility to petition the court for a license to carry a concealed handgun two years after treatment.

 

HB1098 would allow volunteer fire departments to operate a newborn safety device under the Safe Haven Act if they are staffed 24 hours a day. The Safe Haven Act allows a parent to anonymously relinquish custody of an infant. HB1098 would also allow a parent to leave a newborn child with a medical provider staff member after delivery of the newborn.

 

The House passed HB1101 which amends the law concerning the issuance of a special license plate for disabled veterans. It changes the qualifications for a special license plate to a veteran who is at least 10% disabled. Currently, a veteran must be 30% disabled to qualify.

 

And the House passed HB1122 which amends the law concerning dates for the beginning of the school year. It states the first day of the school year for public elementary and secondary schools shall be on or after the Monday of the week in which August 19 falls,  not earlier than August 14, and not later than August 26.

 

The House will enter the 4th week of the session on Monday, January 30th.

You can watch all House proceedings at arkansashouse.org.

 

1-27-23 5:05 PM KAWX.ORG

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Expanding Arkansas’s National Security Role

 

Protecting the United States and our interests is a fundamental responsibility for the federal government. Our founders made this role clear when they wrote the Constitution with the intent to, in part, “provide for the common defense.”

 

Today we understand how vital that is in the face of threats from adversaries and competitors around the world.

 

The Chinese Communist Party is actively seeking to displace the United States from atop the international order. Russia openly threatens global security and wages unprovoked wars to expand its influence and territory. Iran continues to pursue nuclear weapons and underwrite terrorist activity in the Middle East and beyond.

 

There are numerous other challenges on the horizon, which simply underscores the need to ensure America’s military is always able and ready to defend our homeland and protect our interests.

 

One thing Natural State residents should feel increasing pride and excitement with is Arkansas’s growing footprint in the national security space.

 

In addition to the vital ongoing missions at Little Rock Air Force Base, Pine Bluff Arsenal, Camp Robinson in North Little Rock, Ebbing Air National Guard Base in Fort Smith and the Fort Chaffee Joint Maneuver Training Center, we have been fortunate – through a combination of hard work, strategic planning and collaboration – to welcome key defense industries to Camden where a skilled workforce and cutting-edge technology are producing vital weapons and tools that help America and our allies maintain superiority on the battlefield.

 

I have always believed in the value of this project and advocated public and private commitments to it because it’s truly a win-win – jobs and economic development for the region and enhanced national security capabilities for our country.

 

Most recently, the Fiscal Year 2023 National Defense Authorization Act provided further significant investments in these enterprises, assuring all involved with this partnership of its long-term viability.

 

Our state is also on the cusp of adding an even higher profile contribution to our national security résumé with Fort Smith’s selection as the preferred location to host the Air Force’s future F-35 Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program that trains military personnel from allied nations on the fifth-generation fighter jet. This development represents yet another significant contribution to our national defense while, at the same time, promising to yield tremendous benefits for the region and our state.

 

The Arkansas Congressional delegation and the Governor’s office have worked hand-in-hand to support this endeavor, including through securing critical funding and facilitating beneficial dialogue between the Department of Defense, state leaders and our allies abroad that plan to participate.

 

This work continued in January as I traveled to Germany, Poland and Finland to discuss our shared defense initiatives and partnership in F-35 training. The meetings were an opportunity to reassure our allies that Arkansas remains committed to this opportunity and stands ready to support any needs for their success and our own.

 

This productive trip was just the latest effort to champion Arkansas’s role in U.S. national security. Our state has incredible resources and features that are ready-made to help ensure the federal government can, as the Constitution envisioned, defend our country.

 

Arkansans should feel confident that your elected officials will continue to advocate fiercely for our state to further expand its ability to contribute to that foundational duty.

 

1-27-23 5:01 PM KAWX.ORG

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US Congressman Bruce Westerman's Weekly Column

Getting Back To Our Roots  

This week, for the first time in almost seven years, the House considered legislation under a modified open rule, taking us one huge step closer to restoring a truly representative government. This parliamentary process allows all members, regardless of party, to submit amendments to a bill to be openly debated on the House floor before a vote.

 

The modified open rule gives members the opportunity to influence legislation and openly advocate for the best interests of their constituents on the House floor. We are returning Congress back towards its foundational principles, open debate and free speech.

 

On this momentous occasion, we considered an energy bill that would rein in government misuse of our Strategic Petroleum Reserve. For this bill alone, there were 143 amendments submitted by members for debate. Of those, 115 were submitted by Democrats, and 28 were submitted by Republicans. This just shows the power of democracy when we tear down the red tape and restrictions and allow it to work. The unlimited opportunity for amendments and open debate ensures that the American people’s voices are heard.

 

My colleagues and I are here to serve our constituents, and it is so crucial that we are able to advocate for your needs. Under the new House Republican majority, there is no more proxy voting – every member of Congress must be present to vote. Doing away with proxy voting was the first step in getting this body of Congress to truly show up to work for all of you at home. And now, the use of the modified open rule does away with restrictions on the amendment and debate process.

 

It is a breath of fresh air to see members of Congress, on both sides of the aisle, actively participating in the parliamentary process. We are making strides toward a more transparent and representative government, just as our constitution intended. I look forward to continuing to serve the 4th District of Arkansas, with fewer restrictions. 

 

Until next time,

Bruce Westerman

 

1-27-23 4:55 PM KAWX.ORG

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Senator Terry Rice's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Terry Rice

January 27, 2023

 

LITTLE ROCK – The first three weeks of the 2023 legislative have session have been remarkable for the wide variety of issues the Senate has addressed.

 

Public schools will get more flexibility in setting their academic calendar, thanks to Senate passage of legislation that widens the window of dates in which the school may begin.

 

Good Samaritan legislation passed by the Senate will add protections for individuals and organizations that try to prevent suicides.

 

Like other government employees, school staff will be allowed to take up to 15 days of leave if they’re for emergencies if they’re in the Civil Air Patrol.

 

Environmental regulations will be loosened slightly, to allow the burning of vegetation as a method of disposal.

 

People who want to become massage therapists will be able to start at the apprentice level, thanks to legislation that allows licensing of student and apprentice therapists.

 

Almost every local and state government in Arkansas flies the American flag every day. Legislation approved by the Senate will require those flags to be made in the United States. The requirement applies to Arkansas flags too.

 

An obscure statute, which most people were not aware of, will be repealed. It required motorists to turn off the ignition of their motor vehicle when they left it unattended. In effect it made outlaws of everyone who started their car in the driveway on winter mornings to warm up while they step back indoors to finish getting ready for work.

 

Senate Bill 47 is a bill of one paragraph that deletes the section in the Arkansas code that required drivers to always turn off their ignitions when leaving the car.

 

The Senate approved legislation to classify drag shows as adult entertainment if they appeal to the audience’s prurient interest. The sponsors say it will prevent sexualized performances in front of children.

 

The Senate Education Committee endorsed legislation that encourages schools to dedicate the final week of January as Holocaust Education week. Beginning in the fall, all public schools must teach courses on the causes and effects of the Holocaust, which refers to the systematic murder of more than six million Jews and other people by the Nazi regime of German during the 1930s and 1940s.

 

A purpose of the requirement is to teach children about the effects of bullying, stereotyping, bigotry and discrimination. Designating the last week of January as Holocaust Awareness Week will be encouraged, but not mandated.

 

The Senate will soon vote on legislation to clarify that a GED is the equivalent of a high school diploma when people apply for a job.

 

The Senate also will consider legislation to prohibit serious sex offenders from owning or operating unmanned aircraft, such as drones.

 

By late in the week, 131 Senate bills and 262 House bills had been filed. In past regular sessions, it’s usual for more than 2,000 bills to be introduced. Between 200 and 300 of those will be budget bills for state agencies, institutions of higher education and public schools. Typically, regular sessions last for 90 to 100 days.

 

1-27-23 4:49 PM KAWX.ORG

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KAWX is moving to 89.3 FM on February 1, 2023!

Polk County Sheriff's Log for January 16th - 22nd

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 16, 2023 – January 22, 2023. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 16, 2023

Deputies responded to a residence near Hatton in reference to juveniles who had run away. They were later located.

 

January 17, 2023

Courtney Sullivan, 26 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for 2nd Degree Forgery.

Deputies responded to a residence on Polk 46 near Mena in reference to dogs being shot.

 

January 18, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 284 near Hatfield in reference to an unattended death.

Ava Dixon, 28 of Gillham was arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department on charges of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery and Abuse of Adults.

 

January 19, 2023

Deputies responded to a residence on Polk 136 near Cove in reference to a cow being shot.

 

January 20, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 67 near Mena in reference to a trespasser.

 

January 21, 2023

Deputies responded to a walk-in complainant in reference to identity fraud.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Stone Lane near Acorn in reference to a disturbance.

 

January 22, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a business on Hwy 71 N near Mena in reference to commercial burglary.

Deputies responded to a report of a wrecked vehicle on Polk 18 near Vandervoort.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 2 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 25 Incarcerated Inmates with 19 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

1-24-23 1:36 P.M. KAWX.ORG

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Mena Police Report for January 15th - 21st

 

Mena Police Department reports for the week of January 15th through January 21st, 2023

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

January 15

A theft report was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 16

A theft report was taken from Walmart.

 

A theft of motor fuel report was taken from Murphy USA.

 

Megan Hubbard, 35, and Curtis Hudson, 53, were both charged with Theft of Property at Walmart.

 

January 17

A report of criminal trespass was taken from Walmart.

 

January 18

Abram Abernathy, 26, was served with warrants at a residence on Evans Circle.

 

January 19

Brandon Falls, 37, was charged with Possession of Marijuana after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

January 20

A report of theft was taken from Walmart.

 

January 21

A report of a dog bite, and dog running at large was taken on 4th street.

 

Cyrus Stephenson, 22, was charged with Drinking in Public at Wendy’s.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-23-23 9:56 A.M. KAWX.ORG

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US and Arkansas Flags to half staff for Monterey Park, California victims

A Proclamation on Honoring the Victims of the Tragedy in Monterey Park, California
 
As a mark of respect for the victims of the senseless acts of violence perpetrated on January 21, 2023, in Monterey Park, California, by the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, I hereby order that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, January 26, 2023. I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same length of time at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.
 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-seventh.
 
                              JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.
 
1-23-23 6:47 A.M. KAWX.ORG
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The United States Semiquincentennial, July 4, 2026

This is the first in a series of articles that will be shared on KAWX.ORG, written and submitted by Kathy Hagler of the local James K. Polk Chpater of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, leading up to the 250th birthday of the USA on July 4, 2026.

 

The United States Semiquincentennial,  or 250th, birthday,  will be July 4, 2026. There will be festivities scheduled nationwide to mark the events leading up to our nation's birthday. 

 

There were no major government sponsored observances or celebrations in1826, which was the 50th anniversary of our country's existence. Former presidents and signers of the Declaration of Independence, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, both died on July 4,1826. Nationwide celebrations were held in 1876,the 100th anniversary of our country's existence and were centered around the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.  In 1926, a Sesquicentennial, or 150th,  Exposition was held in Philadelphia and in 1976, Bicentennial,  or 200th anniversary, observances were held around the country. 

The United States Semiquincentennial Commission Act of 2016 directs the United States Government to issue commemorative coins and postage stamps and commission appropriately named navel vessels, ahead of the semiquincentennial. Officially organized and independently created activities are also being planned. The legislation specifically directs the organization of events "in locations of historical significance to the United States ". Included on this list are the "leading cities "of Boston, Charleston, New York and Philadelphia. 

 

Kathy Hagler, 2nd Vice Regent 

James K. Polk Chapter, NSDAR 

 

1-22-23 11:01 A.M. KAWX.ORG

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

House members will enter the third week of the 2023 Regular Session on Monday.

 

In the second week, several bills passed the House and are now making their way to the Senate.

 

On Wednesday, the House passed HB1018. This bill will allow members of municipal fire department bomb squads to carry weapons while responding to bomb threats.

 

The House also passed HB1086. This bill amends the law concerning parking privileges for a person with a disabled veteran special license plate. It states vehicles with a disabled veteran special license plate can have access to disabled parking spaces if the vehicle also displays a special certificate issued by the Office of Motor Vehicle.

 

On Thursday, the House passed HB1023. This bill states that all US flags and Arkansas flags purchased by a public entity with public funds shall be made and manufactured in the United States.

 

The House passed HB1024. This bill removes the requirement to collect a tax on prepared food and hotel purchases for cities seeking to create an entertainment district.

 

The House also passed HB1028. This bill replaces the term “child pornography” with the term “child sexual abuse material” in Arkansas code. This is the term used by several states and by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. 

 

Close to 170 bills have been filed in the House so far. More than 70 bills have been filed in the Senate.

 

We will continue to update you on developments throughout the session.

 

You can watch all committee meetings and House floor proceedings at arkansashouse.org.

 

1-20-23 4:33 P.M. KAWX.ORG

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Recipe for Reaching Children in Need 

 

Americans have long called on Washington to cut inefficiencies in federal programs and modernize them for the 21st century. Yet rarely, are those calls heard on Capitol Hill.

 

Come this summer, we will get a good glimpse at what happens when Congress follows through with rhetoric and puts change into motion, as a lot of hungry children will be helped as a result.

 

A long overdue modernization of our summer meals program, based on ideas I have championed for years, recently became law.

 

These reforms update rules that have been in place for over 60 years. Generations of families have struggled with the challenges these restrictive regulations presented while Washington sat idle.

 

Those difficulties arose from the requirement that children travel to a central location and eat at that site during the summer. This may work well in some communities. However, in rural areas, it can be difficult for children to reach a meal site, if one even exists.

 

Continuing down this antiquated path left many families scrambling to find access to nutritious meals for their children during the months when classes are not in session.

 

The solution I have long advocated for, and successfully incorporated in the Fiscal Year 2023 government funding package, is to give states more options to reach hungry children during the summer. There are proven ways to achieve this goal, but until now, states have been powerless to employ commonsense approaches like off-site meal options or the issuance of electronic benefits cards. 

 

These options do not replace congregate feeding sites, which as I previously noted, work well in many communities. But the one-size-fits all approach is outdated, and states have needed additional ways to fill the void in communities where it is not feasible for children to gather in a central location to eat.

 

Moving forward, states will be allowed to provide non-congregate meal options, such as grab-and-go or home delivery, to eligible children, and issue Summer Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards, capped at $40 per child per month, to eligible families on a permanent basis.

 

These options proved to be quite effective during the pandemic. When social distancing mandates were in place, Congress waived the requirement for children to travel to a central location and eat their meals onsite. In turn, this spurred innovation with public-private partnerships that provided access to nutritious meals for young Arkansans.  

We already had evidence to show summer EBT works. Pilot programs conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture prior to the pandemic showed summer EBT successfully reduced child hunger by over 30 percent among participants.

 

A handful of my colleagues and I had been pushing for these changes for many years. The success of these options during the pandemic convinced the rest of Congress it was time to act. While I am pleased to see these much-needed reforms are now law, it really should not be this difficult for Congress to act when a solution is staring us in the face.

 

While government is almost always behind the curve on innovation, we can show the American people that we are serious about fixing the way Washington works. It just takes a willingness from policymakers to focus on solutions, rather than punditry. Ending food insecurity is a great place to start that commitment. 

 

1-20-23 4:25 P.M. KAWX.ORG

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Congressman Bruce Westerman's Weekly Column: Spending, Spending, Spending

Spending, Spending, Spending.

 

The United States has officially hit our $31.4 trillion debt limit. In response, the Treasury Department is embarking on “extraordinary” measures to ensure the federal government has enough money to stay afloat. Before we dig a little deeper into this, let’s get one thing clear – it was “extraordinary” and wildly irresponsible spending that got us to this point in the first place.

 

In December 2021, Congress voted to raise the debt limit to pay for the historic influx of spending amid the COVID-19 era. President Biden was a strong supporter of fast-tracking the process to raise the debt limit then, and it sent us even deeper into a never-ending spiral of spending and debt. And now look where we are. Not even 13 months later, we’re right back in this same situation again.

 

In the meantime, The Treasury Department will continue to enact “extraordinary” measures and will move money around to remain under the cap and keep the government afloat, but this won’t last forever. If the Treasury Department exhausts all extraordinary measures, it will be unable to pay bills and force us to default on our debt – something that would be economically devastating and could result in a global financial crisis. We cannot let this happen.

 

It's time to look in the mirror and face the facts – our nation has a debt problem, and it’s Congress’ job to fix it. Our national debt has always been a cause of great concern for me and my Republican colleagues in the House. And although hitting the debt limit raises serious economic fears, I believe we have been presented with a unique opportunity to enact positive, proactive change in the federal government’s spending habits. But we cannot make those changes or cut spending without bipartisan conversations. Raising the debt limit ensures that we pay the credit card bill. What we have to do is make sure that in the future, we’re not creating a new, unwieldy bill. The only lasting way to ensure that we control our debt is to work across the aisle to do so, and I am ready to get to work.

 

It is my hope that the Biden Administration will work proactively with House Republicans as we work diligently to prioritize spending, cut back on unnecessary spending, streamline and lower costs, and strengthen our national security and economy so we can end this cycle of out-of-control debt growth. These are the first steps in getting America back on the right track.

 

Until next week,

 

Bruce Westerman

 

1-20-23 10:27 A.M.

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State Senator Terry Rice's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Terry Rice

January 20, 2023

 

LITTLE ROCK – There are many stages in the process of convicting criminals and sentencing them to prison. Senate Bill 2, the “Truth in Sentencing and Parole Reform Act of 2023,” will change many of them.

 

Currently SB 2 is a shell bill, which means it consists only of the title. That’s because the co-sponsors are still gathering ideas from people in the many areas of law enforcement that will be affected.

 

Stakeholders include county sheriffs and police departments, prosecutors, judges, wardens, prison security officers, parole and probation officers, transition programs, victims’ rights advocates, defense attorneys, drug courts, specialty courts, drug treatment programs and alcohol abuse programs.

 

The reforms will cost money, so SB 2 will have a ripple effect on the other spending categories in state government.

Last year many elected officials listed stronger law enforcement as one of their campaign issues.

 

In an interview, the Senate sponsor said that a major focus of the bill would be to protect people from repeat violent offenders who are released from prison on parole, sometimes after serving as little as a sixth of their sentence.

 

Under SB 2 inmates would have to earn their parole eligibility through good behavior; it would not be guaranteed merely by serving a portion of their sentence. The bill would create incentives for inmates to complete rehabilitation programs.

 

One challenge the sponsors must address is that about 1,700 inmates are being held in county jails in an average month while they wait for available space to open in a state prison unit.

 

County jails don’t have the funds or resources for the programs that state prisons can offer, such as treatment for drug abuse and job training. Thus, while inmates are serving time in in a county jail they are not preparing for a productive life after their release.

 

The measure will lengthen sentences and tighten parole provisions because violent offenders are getting out too soon, the sponsor said. Some inmates don’t participate in job training and drug rehab programs. A strong incentive to participate would be to make it a requirement in order to become eligible for parole.

 

The legislature will consider proposals to add prison space. The question is how many more beds to build, and how many of the new beds will be for violent and dangerous offenders.

 

At the end of 2022 the Department of Correction had more than 17,000 inmates in its jurisdiction. That is an increase of about 3,000 more inmates since 10 years ago, and an increase of about 5,000 inmates since 20 years ago.

 

In fiscal year 2010 the legislature appropriated $338 million from the state’s general revenue fund to the Correction Department for operating state prisons. Last fiscal year the appropriation was $494 million.

 

The Senate co-sponsor of SB 2 said that garnering a consensus in support of the bill would depend on its total cost. It probably will be a couple of weeks before the details are finalized. When that happens, the bill will be amended. It will no longer be a shell bill with just a title, but will be “a fairly large piece of legislation.”

 

1-20-23 9:39 A.M. KAWX.ORG

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Mena School Board Meeting Recap

The Mena School Board conducted their January meeting on Wednesday, January 18th in the district administration building.

 

Dr. Lee Smith began the meeting with the Superintendent’s Report. He updated the board on Governor Sander’s education plan Arkansas LEARNS as well as the legislative session.

 

Smith then stated that the district continues to lag behind their attendance goal. The attendance rate for the 1st semester was 92.3% but Mena Middle School and Mena High School have increased their percentage rate. Attendance continues to be an issue for Louise Durham Elementary and Holly Harshman Elementary. On a positive note the number of discipline incidents in the first semester is down significantly over last year. From 503 incidents last year to 398 this year.

 

Smith then recognized Assistant Superintendent Bridget Buckley for an update on the district’s reading fluency. Mena Middle School was led by the 8th grade. Of those who were reading below grade level 66% are now reading at grade level. Mena High School was led by the 9th grade with  63% of those below grade level having made progress in the first semester. . Meanwhile Holly Harshman Elementary had a total of 43 students improve to grade level. Louise Durham is currently underway with NWEA Testing and those results will be available soon.

 

Buckley added that HHE and MMS are doing exceptionally well in the “Great Reading Games” with Learning Ally. HHE is currently third in the nation having read over 100,000 pages and MMS is twelfth in the nation having read over 23,000 pages. According to Learning Ally there are 17,500 schools nationwide who use this resource for struggling readers.

 

In new business Dr. Smith acknowledged the boards hard work over the past year and each board member was given a gift package from the Sassafras Bakehouse for School Board Appreciation Month.

 

Next was the school board member training report. Dr. Smith informed the board whether they had met all the yearly training requirements. This information is reported to the state each year.

 

The board was informed that their statement of financial interest is due January 31st, 2023.

 

Approval was given for the renewal of the school board legal liability insurance with a premium of $9,977.00.

 

Mrs. Buckley then provided an update on 2023 model policy updates. 

1. Covid Leave policies for both Certified and Classified staff have been repealed. 

2. School choice applications will only be accepted between January 1 and May 1 through either electronic timestamp submission or postmark. Schools can decline to accept due to having to hire additional staff for a grade, program or building capacity.

3. Schools will provide age appropriate education regarding breastfeeding as well as providing support and space for employees, students or volunteers who are breastfeeding mothers. Break time will be provided according to the employee, student or volunteer needs.

4. Visitors are directed to not use devices to record audio or video or take photographs when a general expectation of privacy exists. Visitors will not post, create, send, share, capture audio, video, or photographs of students unless permission is granted by the guardian or the student who is 18, is authorized by the district or is required to do so as a part of the job duties. 

 

Next on the agenda was the proposed budget of expenditures for July 1, 2024 - June 30th, 2025. It was approved with a total budget of 12.6 million dollars.

 

The board approved the latest financial report. With Dr. Smith saying that expenses did outpace revenue this past month which is normal for December.

 

The board then approved the renewal of Dr. Lee Smith’s contract as superintendent of schools to extend to the 2025-2026 school year with a raise to $125,000. 

 

Finally in personnel the board accepted the resignation of:

 

Samantha Breedlove - 7th grade and Jr. High Cheer Coach - effective 12-21-22

 

Alexa Brewer - Paraprofessional MHS - effective 12-22-22

 

Kelly Bowen - Bus Driver - effective 1-9-23

 

Donna Golden - 3rd Grade Teacher HHE - effective 3-3-23

 

Alyssa Hostetler - MHS Secretary - effective no later than 6-30-23

 

Restructure:

 

Kristine Albin - From MHS ELA to Journalism/Yearbook

 

Hire:

 

Shawna Powell - MHS ELA  -  Replacing Kristine Albin - effective 1-9-23

 

Amber Hendricks - MMS AE Paraprofessional - replacing Tiffany Sims - effective 1/16/23

 

Misty Mullen - Junior High Cheer Coach - replacing Samantha Breedlove for the remainder of the 2022-2023 school year.

 

Chad Pettigrew - C route bus driver - effective 1-9-23

 

Alyssa Hostetler - Bookkeeper - replacing Suzanne Bentley - effective no later than 6-30-23

 

1-19-23 9:35 A.M. KAWX.ORG

Mena Police Report for January 8th - 14th

Mena Police Department reports for the week of January 8th through January 14th, 2023

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

January 8

A theft report was taken at a residence on Evans Circle.

 

A report of theft and criminal mischief was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 9

A report of assault and disorderly conduct was taken at a residence on South Reine Street.

 

January 10

Kyle Scheppman, 32, was charged with Possession of a Schedule 2 Controlled Substance, Possession of a Schedule 4 Controlled Substance, and served with warrants after contact at EZ Mart.

 

A missing persons report was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Michael White, 57, was charged with Simultaneous Possession of Drugs and Firearms, Possession of Firearms by Certain Persons, Possession of Meth, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia (Felony), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia (Misdemeanor), Driving on Suspended License, and No Vehicle License after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

January 11

Rodney Morrison, 37, was served with a warrant after contact at Kess’ Korner.

 

Bobby May, 35, was served with warrants after contact on Magnolia Avenue.

 

Jason Rosson, 41, was charged with Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, Breaking or Entering, Residential Burglary, and Theft of property at a residence on Warner Avenue.

 

January 12

No report.

 

January 13

No report.

 

January 14

A report of theft was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

A report of theft was taken from a person at the hospital.

 

Colton Loyd, 18, was charged with Theft of Property at Walmart.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-17-23 12:36 P.M. KAWX.ORG

Polk County Sheriff's Log for January 9th - 15th

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 9, 2023 – January 15, 2023. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 9, 2023

No reports.

 

January 10, 2023

Nancy Odle, 38 of Cove was arrested on a charge of Violation of a No Contact Order and Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance.

 

January 11, 2023

Holly Robinson, 31 of Mena was arrested on charges of Interference with Custody, Endangering the Welfare of a Minor and Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor.

 

January 12, 2023

Deputies responded to a walk-in complainant in reference to a dog bite victim.

Deputies responded to a residence on Cardinal Lane near Acorn in reference to property damage.

 

January 13, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 69 near Big Fork in reference to a verbal domestic dispute.

 

January 14, 2023

Natasha Smith, 45 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of a Schedule I or II Controlled Substance.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Gober Lane near Mena in reference to a physical domestic disturbance leading to the arrest of Tammy Turner, 43 of Mena on a charge of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery.

A call to a residence on Trailwood Lane near Mena led to the arrest of Jericho Clements, 27 of Mena to be held for another agency for outstanding warrants.

Clayton Kesterson, 29 of Wickes was arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department on a charge of DWI.

Ashley Laughter, 51 of Mena was arrested on charges of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery, Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct and 1st Degree Terroristic Threatening.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 56 near Nunley in reference to a physical domestic disturbance leading to the arrest of Laura Hanks, 51 of Mena on charges of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery, Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct and 2nd Degree Terroristic Threatening.

 

January 15, 2023

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Pebble Lane near Board Camp in reference to a criminal mischief complaint.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 332 near Cove in reference to stolen property.

Deputies responded to a report of a vehicle fire on Hwy 246 West.

Deputies responded to a residence on Butler Circle near Hatfield in reference to a residential burglary. Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney for further consideration.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 2 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 25 Incarcerated Inmates with 18 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

1-17-23 9:25 A.M. KAWX.ORG