KAWX News

Mena Police Report for January 9TH - 15TH

 

 

Mena Police Department reports for the week of January 9th through January 15th, 2022

 

 

January 9

No report taken.

 

January 10

A report of dog running at large was taken at a residence on Dickson Road.

 

A report of theft of vehicle was taken at a residence on Miller Avenue.

 

January 11

A report of criminal mischief was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

A report of violation of a protection order was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 12

A report of violation of a protection order was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Kristina Hannaman, 48, was served with two warrants at the police department.

 

Audre Simmons, 35, was served with four warrants on Pine Avenue.

 

A report of criminal trespass was taken at ta residence on Oak Grove Avenue.

 

A report of assault was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 13

A report of theft was taken from Walmart.

 

A report of possession of meth and possession of drug paraphernalia was taken after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

A report of a missing person was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 14

A report of criminal mischief and theft was at a residence on North Adams Street.

 

January 15

A report of breaking or entering was taken at a building on Highway 71.

 

A report of violation of a protection order was taken at a residence on Cole Avenue.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-18-22 1:01 p.m. KAWX.ORG

Polk County Sheriff's Log for January 10TH - 16TH

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 10, 2022 – January 16, 2022. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 10, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 287 near Cove in reference to a disturbance leading to the arrest of Vergeina Thornton, 50 of Cove on a Misdemeanor Warrant for Third Degree Battery.

Darius Sims, 22 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Aggravated Assault, Third Degree Battery and Intimidating a Witness.

Jereme Baughman, 44 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance.

Eric Williams, 45 of Cove was arrested on a Body Attachment.

Deputies responded to a walk-in complaint in reference to be Harassed via Text Message.

 

January 11, 2022

David Sinyard, 46 of Wickes was arrested on three Felony Failure to Appear Warrants and five Misdemeanor Failure to Appear Warrants.

Dewayne Quirin, 35 of Branson, MO was arrested by an officer with Probation Parole to be held for another agency.

 

January 12, 2022

No reports were filed.

 

January 13, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to and address on Mills Lane near Mena in reference to a land dispute.

 

January 14, 2022

Shaon Watts, 43 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant, two Misdemeanor Warrants for Contempt of Court and one Misdemeanor Warrant for Failure to Appear.

Annette Hubbard, 56 of Cove was arrested on a charge of DWI.

 

January 15, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a vehicle in the ditch on Hwy 8 West leading to the arrest of John E Burnett, 62 of Mena on a charge of DWI.

 

January 16, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 91 near Hatfield in reference to an altercation leading to the arrest of James Taylor, 46 of Hatfield on a charge of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 2 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 23 Incarcerated Inmates, with 13 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC22-00027

 

1-18-22 9:30 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Gov. Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address

To listen to Governor Hutchinson's weekly radio address, click anywhere on this line, then click on the play button.

 

This week, we announced an economic development win for Arkansas that is the largest single project investment in state history. Today, I’d like to share some details about the new U.S. Steel plant, which eventually will create more than 900 high-paying jobs and will make Mississippi County the Number 1 steel-producing county in the nation.

 

The competition for the mill was intense, but we won because of our workforce, our business-friendly environment, our abundant, renewable, and clean power, superior Class 1 rail service, and easy access to Mississippi River docks and interstate trucking.

 

The Arkansas Economic Development Commission and Mississippi County’s economic development team, prepared a first-rate package for U.S. Steel. The 93rd General Assembly supported the effort with legislation that offers an income-tax credit to steel manufacturers that invest in equipment to reduce waste, and reuse or recycle materials. U.S. Steel plans to be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

The process moved quickly, and our nimble economic development team had the savvy and the resources to keep pace. U.S. Steel announced in September last year that it was looking for a place to build a state-of-the-art mini-mill. Only three months later, the company announced it would build in Arkansas. 

 

U.S. Steel will invest more than $3 billion to build its plant in Osceola next to the Big River Steel. The company hopes to break ground by spring and to be fully operational by 2024. That is moving very quickly for a $3 billion project.

 

This effort highlights the need to be able to act quickly and is built on the foundation laid by previous Arkansas governors. When Bill Clinton was governor, he helped recruit Nucor Steel to Mississippi County. And under former Governor Mike Beebe, voters approved Amendment 82, which allowed the state to offer incentives to attract industry. U.S. Steel now owns Big River Steel. And now, I was able to make the case for Arkansas in my meetings with the CEO of U.S. Steel, Dave Burritt.

 

I can’t overstate the importance of this plant to Mississippi County’s economy and its residents. In the ’90s, Mississippi County lost more than 9,000 jobs in a short period of time. This mill will add back more than 900 to the nearly 5,000 jobs that have returned. The average salary will be more than $100,000. 

 

The plant will produce the high-end steel used to build cars and appliances, and the economic development commission can build on this success by recruiting even more industry, such as automakers.

 

The benefits of this steel mill extend beyond the economy and will improve the quality of life in Northeast Arkansas in intangible ways we haven’t imagined. As Secretary of Commerce Mike Preston said, with the expansion of our steel industry, the sky’s the limit.

 

1-15-22 12:27 p.m. KAWX.ORG

US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Curbing Inflation Must Be A Priority

 

A November 2021 Gallup poll identified inflation as one of the top five most important issues for Americans. This is no surprise considering the price increases we’re facing for everyday essentials. Each month, our dollars stretch less and too many are forced to make difficult decisions about their budgets.

 

Prices are going up faster than wages so our purchasing power has diminished. We’ve all experienced the higher prices at the pump. In the past year the cost for gasoline has increased 50 percent. The price for heating our homes is going up, with industry leaders expecting homeowners will pay about 30 percent more this winter to stay warm. At the grocery store beef and bacon are nearly 20 percent more expensive than last year. Food inflation is at its highest rate since the Carter administration, so every American feels the pinch with each trip to the supermarket. 

 

In Arkansas, where agriculture is a vital component of our state’s economy, farmers are concerned about input costs. Land, machinery, labor, fuel, seed and livestock feed prices are all increasing. Fertilizer prices have spiked as much as 300 percent in some parts of the country. One agriculture economist at the Arkansas Division of Agriculture predicts 2022 will be an expensive year for producers. Farmers are afraid these predictions will become reality. A recent monthly survey from CME Group and Purdue University shows a majority of ag producers surveyed expect production costs to rise by at least 12 percent over the next year. 

 

The National Federation of Independent Business reports inflation is the biggest problem for small business owners. Rising costs make it harder to sustain their operations and cloud the economic outlook, which is troubling given how integral local retailers and industries are to our communities.

 

Business leaders, agriculture producers and families in Arkansas raised alarms about inflation months ago. This has been a cause for concern for some time. More than six months ago I used this column to warn of the threat inflation posed if the Biden administration continued its irresponsible spending policies. Consumer prices have risen each month since, and we’re now experiencing the highest inflation rate since 1982.

 

Due to the failure of the White House and Democrats in Congress to address this urgent problem, life has become more difficult for too many Arkansans and Americans.

 

Even now, they are doubling down on partisan priorities and continuing to push for costly proposals that will hit hardworking Americans in their wallets. Despite the warning signs, the president has downplayed rising inflation and spent the entirety of 2021 fixated on unilaterally passing a cradle-to-grave, tax-and-spending agenda.  

 

President Biden promised not to raise taxes on working-class Americans, but his policies and inaction have enabled rampant inflation, which is a hidden tax on those who can least afford it – seniors on fixed incomes, single parents and families living paycheck-to-paycheck.

 

Curbing these price increases should be a top priority. It’s time the president and my colleagues on the other side of the aisle join Republicans in pursuing solutions to reduce the hardships too many Arkansans and folks across the country are experiencing as a result of these misguided policies and misplaced priorities.

 

1-14-22 8:08 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Pre-fiscal budget hearings began this week with the Governor outlining his balanced budget proposal calling for a 3.3% increase in spending. 

 

We will be reviewing the proposal while we continue to hear requests from state agencies and commissions in the days ahead. 

 

As we prepare for the 2022 Fiscal Session, we want to remind you of another series of legislative meetings with a significant impact on our state.

 

Earlier this month, the House and Senate Education Committees met to begin the 2022 Adequacy Study.

 

Public education is the largest spending category in state government. 

 

The Adequacy Study statute requires the House and Senate Education Committees to evaluate the entire spectrum of public education to determine whether students receive equal opportunity for an adequate education.

 

Committee members research everything from teacher salaries to technology needs. Arkansas uses a specific formula, known as the matrix, to arrive at the per-student funding amount.

 

The current foundation funding for public education in Arkansas is $7,182 per student. It is scheduled to increase to $7,349 per student for the 2022-2023 school year.

 

Arkansas ranks 38th in the nation on spending per student.

 

In February, the committees will review state-level and district-level funding and spending.

 

In April, committee members will review teacher recruitment, retention, and salaries and well as professional development and facilities.

 

In May, they will review educational programs and waivers, and in June, they will review student achievement and achievement gaps.

 

A report presented to the education committees this month shows that 40.4% of our 4th graders were ready or exceeding in reading. And 43.1% of 4th graders are ready or exceeding in math. 

 

It also showed ACT composite scores and college-going rates in Arkansas are below the national average. 

 

The adequacy study process takes an in-depth look at what our schools need to help improve these scores and enable our students to succeed. 

 

The final report on the study is due November 1. Members use this report to guide decisions on funding for the following year.

 

The House and Senate Education Committees will meet again on February 7 and February 8. You can watch live-streamed and recorded committee meetings at www.arkansashouse.org.

 

1-14-22 5:45 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

State Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

January 14, 2022

 

LITTLE ROCK – The legislature has begun budget hearings in preparation for the 2022 fiscal session, which begins on February 14.

 

Legislators will consider the governor’s proposed balanced budget of about $6 billion for Fiscal Year 2023, which officially begins on July 1.

 

The governor’s proposal would increase state general revenue spending by 3.3 percent over this year’s budget. This year’s budget is about $5.85 billion and the governor proposes to increase it to $6.04 billion.

 

The governor’s proposed budget is a starting point, and the legislature will finalize all financial decisions, because under the Arkansas Constitution the legislature has the power to authorize state government spending.

 

No matter how the legislature changes the governor’s spending plans, the final version of next year’s budget will be balanced. Arkansas does not deficit spend. If tax revenue declines due to an unforeseen economic downturn, state spending will be reduced proportionately.

 

The governor proposes to increase the Public School Fund by $69.6 million, 3.08 percent. That would bring the fund to $2.33 billion.

 

The governor proposes an increase of $66.3 million in the Department of Human Services budget. That is a 3.72 percent increase, and would bring the state’s share of the DHS budget to $1.85 billion. The federal government provides matching funds for services offered by DHS. Medicaid is the main one.

 

The Children and Family Services Division within DHS administers foster care, child welfare and adoption services. The governor’s proposal would increase funding for child protective services.

 

The budget proposal would reduce the waiting list of families who need home care or community care for loved ones with developmental disabilities. Now, there are a little more than 3,000 people on the waiting list. The governor and legislative leaders are trying to eliminate the need for a waiting list by 2025.

 

Four-year universities would receive an additional $12.2 million in state aid under the budget proposal. That is a 2 percent increase over the $612 million that universities get this year.

 

Two-year colleges now receive about $118 million in state aid. The proposed budget would increase that to $119 million. The increase would be 0.69 percent.

 

The State Police would get a 10.6 percent increase, from $70.6 million to $78 million. The governor said that raising pay for State Troopers would be an incentive for local law enforcement agencies to make their salaries more competitive.

 

The Division of Correction, which operates state prison units, would get an increase of $3.9 million, or 1 percent, bringing its annual spending level to $379 million.

 

The Division of Community Correction has residential treatment centers, and is in charge of probation and parole. Its annual budget would increase by 0.78 percent, or $753,000, to $97.7 million for Fiscal Year 2023.

 

About 55 percent of the state’s general revenue fund goes for education. That includes institutions of higher education, which get 13 percent, and K-12, which gets 40 percent. The state Education Division gets 2 percent. About 32 percent of state general revenue is spent on health and human services, and about 8 percent on prisons and correctional institutions. Various smaller agencies receive the rest.

 

1-14-22 9:43 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Grant Facilitates UARM to 'Break the Mold'

The University of Arkansas Rich Mountain (UARM) hosted 43 female students from Acorn, Mena, Cossatot River, Mt. Ida, and Caddo Hills High Schools for a “Be the Model, Break the Mold” event showcasing non-traditional career exploration/activities. The program was made possible through a $38,400 grant from the Division of Career and Technical Education and facilitated by the DeQueen-Mena Education Service Cooperative (DMESC). Besides UARM, the program was also hosted at Southern Arkansas University, UA Cossatot, UAHT Texarkana, and UAHT Hope.

 

The students were welcomed by Dr. Krystal Thrailkill, Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs before dividing into groups to visit the various technical programs including welding, machine tool, and information technology. The program was strategically designed to have students “hands-on” in each department with projects. Stacy Southerland is the CTE Perkins Coordinator from DMESC and was impressed with UARM’s event, “Rich Mountain was fabulous, so very well organized and provided t-shirt specific to the event. Girls went home with projects they made themselves…so far, no one else has done that!”

 

Southerland explained the Division of Career & Technical Education of DESE sent out a notice that there were grant funds available for CTE Coordinators to apply for funding for projects focused on Non-Traditional Career Exploration/Activities, “and so "Be The Model, Break The Mold'' became our project idea. Since we work together often, and our areas share some of the same resources myself, CTE Coordinator at Southwest Coop, Shannon Puckett and CTE coordinator at SouthCentral Coop, Katie Robertson decided to try a combined effort to meet the need for non-traditional career exploration in our areas, thinking that the bigger the event and the more students we could involve we had a better chance of being funded.”

 

Van Deest is hopeful that this is the first of an annual event and that the concept can lead to other career exploration events that allow students this one on one, hands on experience.

 

UA Rich Mountain’s mission is to provide transformative education to all learners.

 

1-12-22 12:45 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

UARM RN Classes of 2020 & 2021 Pinned

In a tradition that dates back to the mid-1880’s, UA Rich Mountain held its pinning ceremony for the college’s RN Classes of 2020 and 2021 on Thursday, December 2 in the Ouachita Center on campus. The time-honored pinning ceremony signifies membership in a proud and loyal society of nurses. Nurses are an important part of the global healthcare workforce.

 

The RN graduating class of 2020 are: Shannon Abbott, Jordan Bass, Faith Boyd, Chelsea Cabello, Staci Clark, Sherri Edmonds, Chelsie Fechuch, Allyson Hoyle, Anna Kilpatrick, Toni Lawrence, Elizabeth Lopez, Emily McMillan, Velina Miller, Alisha Parnell, Sydni Pena, Mackenzie Pepper, Adrienne Ralls, Olivia Self, Andrew Templeton, Hope Valdovinos, Rebekah Williams, Paige Zimmer. The class of 2021 RN graduates are: Chelsey Arender, Amanda Barrett, Enchantres Carroll, Samantha Cole, Annaliz Del Carmen, Sheryl Felix, Erika Fusher, Devin Gage, Samantha Gough, LaBrisha Green, Kristin Henderson, Alicia Jackson, Misty Scott, Andrea Smith, Chelsey Warren, Brittany Wilhite, Sadrinne Wilson, and Morgan Wittwer.

The UA Rich Mountain is a member of the Arkansas Rural Nursing Education Consortium (ARNEC), which is comprised of eight community and technical colleges located in rural areas of Arkansas. ARNEC was created to provide LPN's/LVN's with the opportunity to take the next step towards advancing their careers in nursing by earning an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree, which prepares them to sit for the RN licensing exam, the NCLEX-RN.

 

Many LPN's/ LVN's have not taken this step because they were not able to stop working and travel to colleges that offered Registered Nurse (RN) completion programs. ARNEC was created to help rural nurses meet this need. ARNEC provides a way for Arkansas’ higher education institutions to serve LPN's/ LVN's who want to become RN's without leaving the communities in which they live and work.

 

Charla Hollin, UA Rich Mountain’s Allied Health Division Chair, noted how sentimental the pinning ceremony is not only tradition and symbolic, it is also more intimate for the students and their friends/families, even beyond the graduation ceremonies. Hollin noted during the ceremony the tremendous challenges faced by these students due to the ongoing pandemic and personnel changes but congratulated them for their perseverance.

 

Two were selected to receive the prestigious Florence Nightingale Award this year: Samantha Cole and Enchantres Carroll.

As part of the ceremony, they have a lamp lighting, inspired by Florence Nightingale, who used a lamp to light her way as she made her rounds to the sick. To the injured, her visits brought feelings of comfort and friendliness. The bright flame has come to symbolize knowledge, enlightenment, experience, and hope.

 

This time-honored pinning ceremony signifies membership in a proud and loyal society of nurses, who are an important part of the global healthcare workforce. A video of the night’s ceremony can be found on the UA Rich Mountain channel on YouTube.com.

 

UA Rich Mountain’s mission is to provide transformative education to all learners.

 

1-11-22 11:45 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Polk County Sheriff's Report for January 3RD - 9TH

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of January 03, 2022 – January 09, 2022. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

January 03, 2022

Elizabeth Finley, 22 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance.

 

January 04, 2022

Brianna Ramirez, 22 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Theft by Receiving and Fraudulent Use of a Credit Card.

 

January 05, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to an address on Polk 35 near Hatfield in reference to a theft.

Deputies responded to a walk-in complainant in reference to a scam resulting in losses of more than $4500.00.

Charles Morgan, 44 of Mena was arrested on charges of Possession of Methamphetamine or Cocaine and Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance.

 

January 06, 2022

No reports were filed.

 

January 07, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a structure fire on Hwy 8 West near Rocky.

Michael Thompson, 40 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Warrant for Possession of Firearms by a Certain Person, two counts of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia with Purpose to Deliver to a Minor and Possession of Methamphetamine or Cocaine with Purpose to Deliver. Thompson was also arrested on a Body Attachment.

 

January 08, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a report of a structure fire on Polk 48 near Potter.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 168 near Hatfield in reference to a verbal argument.

 

January 09, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Frachiseur Road near Grannis in reference to cattle being attacked by dogs.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 2 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 21 Incarcerated Inmates, with 12 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC22-00015

1-11-22 9:24 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

Mena Police Report for January 2ND - 8TH

 

Mena Police Department reports for the week of January 2nd through January 8th, 2022

 

 

 

January 2

No reports.

 

January 3

A harassment report was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

January 4

James Jewell, 31, was served with a warrant at the county jail.

 

Donavan Hunt, 30, was served with a warrant at the county jail.

 

Mary smith, 32, was charged with DWI, Speeding, and Endangering the Welfare of a Minor after a traffic stop on Westmoreland Drive.

 

January 5

Mark Southwick, 47, was served with a warrant at the police department.

 

A theft report was taken at a residence on South Eve Street.

 

January 6

John Fagan, 18, was served with a warrant at the police department.

 

January 7

A report of forgery was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Martin Dollarhyde, 46, was served with a warrant.

 

Perouz Daemi, 68, was charged with Public Intoxication, Disorderly Conduct, and Resisting Arrest after a complaint at Wendy’s.

 

A report of theft was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

A report of assault and disorderly conduct was taken at a residence on Ransom Road.

 

January 8

No reports.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-10-22 9:10 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Governor Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Arkansas W.I.N.S.
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – Today I’d like to talk about how Arkansas has grown stronger over the last year and my plan for continuing that growth into the future. Thanks to the people of Arkansas, we have made this state one of the premier locations for business owners to put their roots down and conduct business that gives well-paying jobs to hard-working Arkansans and puts more money into our state.
 
Last December, we ensured that the state can meet its obligations while being able to lessen the impact of the state’s income tax burden by passing the largest tax cut in the history of Arkansas.
 
Arkansas has a duty to provide solutions to the needs of its people and we are able to do that and more while also lowering their burden.
 
Every decision I have made has been driven by my desire to improve the quality of life in Arkansas. Whether the issue is creating a trained workforce, investing in our infrastructure, or strengthening Arkansas families, the underlying question always has been – and always will be: “Will this make our state a better place in which to live and work?”
 
W.I.N.S. is my newest initiative that aims to push Arkansas even closer to being the best place the state can be.
 
Each letter in W.I.N.S. stands for a pillar that I will focus on to boost Arkansas to success. Workforce Training, Infrastructure, New Economy Jobs, and Strengthening Arkansas Families should be the priorities that can help Arkansas WIN.
 
The future success of our state demands that we make it as easy as possible for skilled workers in need of jobs and businesses in need of those workers to find each other and create success together.
 
With initiatives like the ‘Ready for Life’ program, it will make it easier for employees and employers to find each other, and it will offer business leaders a quick snapshot of the employee pool in Arkansas as they recruit talent.
 
Our infrastructure is the backbone of everyday operations in this state, and it is worth investing in to create a better quality of living. Last year, I created the Infrastructure Planning Advisory committee that will analyze the relief available to Arkansas under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs act of 2021.
 
They will identify the priorities of Arkansas and make recommendations for the most efficient and effective applications of the relief.
 
The future is coming, and the world will be in need of workers to join the new, high-growth industries that are on the cutting edge of technology. These new industries are going to be the driving force of economic growth and productivity in our state and around the world. My push for computer science education was just one way that will help bolster Arkansas’s status in a new age economy.
 
Lastly, but certainly the most important, strengthening Arkansas families. Our focus will be to give families the best chance of success and to protect our children from child abuse and crime. We must engage families by supporting them with the proper connections and safety net.
 
The Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver is a good example. It allows us to provide services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The waiting list for this waiver is of great concern to us, and we have a commitment and a plan to address it. That list represents thousands of Arkansas families, and we aim to give them hope for the future.
 
Arkansas is in a prime position to continue winning thanks to developments we have made so far and for what is to come.
 
1-8-22 7:41 a.m. KAWX.ORG

 

State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

January is known as Human Trafficking Awareness Month. It is a time for us to educate ourselves about human trafficking and learn to spot the signs of trafficking. 

 

Human trafficking, also known as trafficking in persons or modern-day slavery, is a crime that involves compelling or coercing a person to provide labor or services or to engage in commercial sex acts. The coercion can be subtle or overt, physical or psychological. 

 

It endangers the lives of millions of people, and it is a crime that knows no borders.

 

In the 2021 Regular Session, we passed legislation strengthening our laws to combat human trafficking in Arkansas.

 

Act 798 provides heightened conditions for release on bail for persons accused of human trafficking and human-trafficking related offenses. Under the act, the conditions imposed may include an ankle monitor or GPS-enabled tracking device, restricted movement limited to the person's residence except in the case of a medical emergency, a restriction on internet access and access to electronic media, and an agreement by the defendant to abide by certain rules.

 

Act 1106 establishes an affirmative defense for victims of human trafficking accused of certain offenses. 

 

Act 1098 creates the offenses of grooming a minor for future sex trafficking and traveling for the purpose of an unlawful sex act with a minor. 

 

In 2019, the Polaris Project worked on 11,500 situations of human trafficking reported to the Polaris-operated U.S. National Human Trafficking Hotline. These situations involved 22,326 individual survivors, nearly 4,384 traffickers, and 1,912 suspicious businesses. Human trafficking is notoriously underreported. Shocking as these numbers are, they are likely only a fraction of the actual problem.

 

To report suspected human trafficking, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll-free hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or text the hotline at 233733. 

 

You can also chat the National Human Trafficking Hotline via www.humantraffickinghotline.org/chat.

 

1-7-22 6:02 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

2022 Offers New Opportunities to Make Bipartisan Progress

 

Congress ended 2021 by strengthening national security and improving resources to our servicemembers and their families with passage of the bipartisan Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Act, which will allow us to be better prepared for threats from our adversaries and protect our interests at home and abroad. The bipartisan support for this bill was a big accomplishment considering Congress spent much of the year debating the partisan agenda driven by the president and his allies in Congress. It’s time to leave that agenda behind and instead advance policies where consensus is possible and members of both parties are invited to participate. I’ve introduced and championed legislation that gives us a good starting point.

 

This year we will begin crafting the reauthorization of the farm bill. This critical legislation is vital to economic growth in Arkansas because agriculture is a major component of The Natural State’s economy. As the top Republican on the Senate Agriculture Committee, I’ll always be an advocate for Arkansas producers. Writing a farm bill is a delicate balancing act, as the varying needs of each region and commodity must be met. That is why each one has historically been crafted with bipartisan support. I’m hopeful that trend will continue as the committee engages with stakeholders who grow food and fiber to feed and clothe the world when we begin the process of writing the next farm bill.

 

I’m looking forward to continuing the momentum we built in the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee last year to improve mammography services at Department of Veterans Affairs facilities. The committee approved the SERVICE Act, legislation I authored to modernize the VA’s policies to require mammograms for all women who served in areas associated with burn pits and other toxic exposures. We know that women who serve in locations with these dangers have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Ensuring access to these medical tests and screenings regardless of age, symptoms or family history is vital.

 

Another bipartisan initiative I’m helping lead, the MAMMO for Veterans Act, would require the VA to develop a strategic plan to improve breast imaging services and create a telemammography pilot program for veterans in areas where the VA does not offer in-house mammography. With these reforms, we are on the verge of passing major improvements to prevent and treat breast cancer and ultimately save lives of brave Americans. I’m working with my colleagues on the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee to advance these bills and get them to the president’s desk to be signed into law.

 

We’ve also taken action to increase investment in wildlife conservation this Congress. The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee (EPW) recently held a hearing on the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, legislation to empower and support collaborative conservation efforts in all corners of our country. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission is championing the bill and I’m also proud to support this measure which is receiving backing from both Republicans and Democrats. The committee hearing is a good step forward as we work to build even more support in order to debate and pass it to the Senate floor.

 

These are just a few of the policy initiatives we can achieve if we work across the aisle. I will continue to press the administration on the need to work with Republicans to address raging inflation, skyrocketing energy costs and an unchecked border crisis. We have a positive example of what can be accomplished if both parties have a seat at the negotiating table and get to work on behalf of the American people.

 

1-7-22 3:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

New Chamber Director & Board Members Announced

Melanie Wade has been named the new Mena Polk County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director beginning January 10. Wade brings with her extensive experience in event planning, communications, and a strong spirit of community volunteerism.

 

Wade is no stranger to the local area, relocating here from Oklahoma in 2012. She quickly became embedded in the community through volunteering and her role as News Director for Pulse Multi-Media from 2013 – 2015.

 

“Melanie has an impeccable work ethic. She has a vast network throughout our community and has built many strong relationships based on trust, love of community, collaboration, and a vision of how everyone can work together to promote and grow Mena/Polk County,” said 2022 Chamber President LeAnn Dilbeck.

 

The Chamber board will welcome three new members for 2022: Jessica Smith, Mena Regional Health System; Tanner Hooper, Chambers Bank; and Brooke Hines, SouthWest EMS. Holly Henry of Meadow Pine Cabins was also re-elected for her second term. The full 2022 Board of Directors are: LeAnn Dilbeck, President; Brad Castor, Mike Godfrey, Greg Goss, Terri Harrison, David Maxwell, Sara Mitchell, Nina Moore, Jessica Smith, Tanner Hooper, Brooke Hines, Pilar Fowler (past President but no voting rights). A new executive board will be elected during the January board meeting to be held January 20.

 

The Chamber office will also be temporarily relocated to 601 Mena Street while the City of Mena addresses some necessary renovations at the Mena Depot Center. “We anticipate returning once the repairs are complete,” said Dilbeck. She also expressed the Chamber’s appreciation for the continued partnership with Mayor Seth Smith and the City of Mena.

 

Pilar Fowler, past President, said that the last couple of years have been challenging for the Chamber and its members but the board already has some very exciting events and member development plans slated for 2022. “We strongly believe that Melanie is the perfect fit for this renewed focus and energy that the Chamber has for 2022.”

 

Wade is enthusiastic to take the lead at the Chamber, “I am very honored and excited to take on the role of Executive Director of the Mena/Polk County Chamber of Commerce. I absolutely love this community and I can think of no better way to give back the warm welcome my family has received while living here. To plan, promote, and preserve this beautiful area is something that is close to my heart and I look forward to working for, and with, all involved.”

 

Wade will assist the board in reviewing applicants for an administrative assistant with hopes of being fully relocated and fully staffed by February 1. Until then, the Chamber offices at the depot are closed but Wade can still be reached at 479.394.2912 or at director@chambermenapolkchamber.com.

 

The Chamber of Commerce is an integral part of a growing and thriving community and Dilbeck is optimistic for 2022, “The Chamber is like most businesses in Mena… a small business. We are membership driven and in 2022 will strive to not only promote our area for economic growth, relocation, and tourism but to create value for our members. Our mission is to be a resource for our members and our community. So stay tuned… more announcements are coming!”

 

1-7-22 10:32 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

State Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

January 7, 2022

 

LITTLE ROCK – This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Arkansas Supreme Court’s landmark decision in the Lake View school funding case.

 

In 2002 the court ruled that the state’s system of funding public school was unconstitutional. The legislature approved massive increases in school funding, and enacted tougher school standards.

 

One result of the Lake View decision is that the legislature now regularly conducts an assessment of the adequacy of school funding. The purpose is for students to be academically proficient for their grade level.

 

The Senate and House Education Committees have begun the current adequacy study. During a two-day meeting, the committee heard a report on academic progress that Arkansas students have made since the state initiated a series of education reforms to comply with the Lake View ruling.

 

Arkansas students showed academic improvement during the first ten years the Lake View ruling, but those improvements have not been consistent.

 

An analysis of academic indicators shows that “progress … has stalled or, in some cases, declined since around 2013. When current data is compared with other states, Arkansas often ranks among the lower performing states.”

 

It was difficult to draw conclusions in several categories because Arkansas has changed its standardized testing multiple times. More than 20 years ago a judge in the Lake View case cited test scores indicating that only 44 percent of fourth graders were proficient in reading, and only 34 percent were proficient in math.

 

Recent test results are mixed, showing that 40 percent of fourth graders are proficient in reading and 43 percent are proficient in math.

 

Arkansas fourth graders and eighth graders are still below the national average in math, reading and science.

 

After the Lake View case Arkansas high school students caught up to the national average on the ACT college entrance exams. However, their average scores began to drop again in 2017. The decline probably was due to the fact that more students were taking the ACT. With college entrance exams, it’s generally true that when more students take the test, the lower their average scores will be.

 

Arkansas is 42nd in the nation in high school graduation rates, up from 46th in the year 2000. In rankings that compare the number of adults with a college degree, Arkansas is still 49th. The most recent surveys indicate that 23.3 percent of adults in Arkansas have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

 

Average teacher salaries have gone up by $16,000 since 2000. Arkansas was ranked as high as 46th in 2019, but went down to 48th in 2020.

 

Legislators on the Education Committee expressed disappointment with the lack of continued academic progress, considering the size of the state’s investment in public schools.

 

The Lake View case began 30 years ago, in 1992. The Lake View School District was a small, rural district in Phillips County that sued the state over disparities in how it funded education.

 

Public schools represent the single largest spending category in state government. Last year the state distributed $2.2 billion through the Public School Fund. That accounted for 40 percent of all state general revenue spending.

 

1-7-22 10:06 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

Mena Police Officers Promoted

Mena Police Chief Tommy Stueart announced the promotion of two Mena Police Department Officers to the rank of Sergeant, effective Friday, January 14, 2022. 

 

The two positions were vacated by Sergeant Mike Wolf and Sergeant Ronnie Richardson who retired last year.

 

 

Sergeant Dalton Myers will assume the position of Shift Supervisor, D2 Day Shift.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sergeant Dalton Myers

 

Sergeant Allen Walker, Shift Supervisor N2, Night Shift.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sergeant Allen Walker

 

1-6-22 2:38 p.m. KAWX.ORG

Commodity Distribution January 20TH in Mena

Commodities will be distributed Thursday, January 20TH at the Polk County Fairgrounds in Mena from 10:00 am until 1:00 pm. The information for the Commodity Distribution is listed below. ARVAC, Inc. is following all safety precautions, therefore this will be a drive-through only distribution                  

 

Listed are the income guidelines, family size and monthly income below:

FAMILY SIZE

WEEK

MONTH

YEAR

1

$ 322

$1,396

$ 16,744

2

$ 436

$1,888

$ 22,646

3

$ 549

$2,379

$ 28,548

4

$ 663

$2,871

$ 34,450

5

$ 776

$3,363

$ 40,352

6

$ 890

$3,855

$ 46,254

7

$ 1,003

$4,347

$ 52,156

8

$1,117

$4,839

$ 58,058

Each additional family member

+ $114

+ $492

+ $5,902

 

The above income guidelines are based on 130% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.

 

Add $492.00 for each additional family member.  You cannot pick up commodities for more than two households. 

 

Rules for acceptance and participation in the program are the same for everyone without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, or handicap.

 

For additional information, contact Stephanie Garner at (479) 219-5292 or (479) 229-4861.

 

1-6-22 9:22 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

Mena Police Report for December 26, 2021 - January 1, 2022

Mena Police Department reports for the week of December 26th through January 1st, 2021

 

December 26

Wendy Harris, 38, was served with a warrant at a residence on Oak Grove Avenue.

 

George Trivette, 29, was served with two warrants at a residence on Fink Street.

 

A report of dogs running at large was taken from a person at Country Express.

 

Kenneth Sipe, 44, was charged with Driving on Suspended License and Expired Tag after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

December 27

A report of computer fraud was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

A report of criminal mischief was taken at a residence on Walnut Avenue.

 

December 28

A report of battery was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Brandon Rose, 24, was served with nine warrants at the county jail.

 

A report of theft was taken from Dollar General.

 

December 29

A report of breaking or entering and theft was taken at a residence on Sarah Way.

 

A report of theft was taken from a walk-in complainant

 

A report of criminal mischief was taken at a residence on Hickory Avenue.

 

December 30

Donald Kenyon, 75, was served with a warrant after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

A report of theft was taken at Walmart.

 

December 31

A report of possession of drug paraphernalia was taken after a traffic stop on Eagle Gap Avenue.


January 1

Cheetara Tosta, 35, was served with a warrant at Limetree Inn.

 

A report of breaking or entering was taken at a residence on Sarah Way.

 

Bradley Moss, 45, was served with a warrant at Executive Inn.

 

A report of harassment was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

Spencer Powell, 32, was served with two warrants after a traffic stop on Highway 71.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

1-4-22 11:09 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Polk County Sheriff's Log for December 27, 2021 - January 2, 2022

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of December 27, 2021 – January 02, 2022. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

December 27, 2021

Deputies responded to a walk-in complainant of vehicle damage while at a business on Hwy 71 near Hillcrest.

Deputies responded to a report of an assault.

 

December 28, 2021

Deputies responded to a mailbox being torn down at a residence on Hwy 375 E near Mena.

 

December 29, 2021

Deputies responded to a complaint of Theft of Property from a property on Burls Hill Lane near Cove.

 

December 30, 2021

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 298 near Mena in reference to a Welfare Check.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Carpenter Street in Hatfield in reference to an unresponsive person.

Jarad Miller, 23 of Cove was arrested on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant and a Misdemeanor Failure to Appear Warrant.

Allen Loving, 56 of Hatfield was arrested on charges of Maintaining a Drug Premise, Public Intoxication and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.

 

December 31, 2021

Deputies responded to a report of damaged mailboxes on Polk 78 near Potter.

 

January 01, 2022

Douglas Manley, 39 of Hatfield was arrested on five Misdemeanor Failure to Appear Warrants.

 

January 02, 2022

Deputies were dispatched to a vehicle accident on Hwy 375 East near Mena leading to the arrest of Matthew Miller, 39 of Mena. He was arrested on one Felony Warrant for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of a Firearm by Certain Persons and five Misdemeanor Warrants. Miller is additionally charged with Possession of Methamphetamine or Cocaine and Furnishing Prohibited Articles. Also, arrested was Cheryl Smith, 32 of Mena on a Felony Warrant for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and charges of Driving without a License, Careless and Prohibited Driving and Fictitious tags. Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney for further consideration.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 3 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 20 Incarcerated Inmates, with 12 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC22-00005

 

1-3-21 5:48 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

Governor Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Overcoming a Year of Challenges
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – As we close out another tough year, I’d like to praise the 3 million people who call Arkansas home. Arkansans always are the first to arrive, they give all they have, and they don’t leave until the job is done. During this last year, Arkansas has had its share of challenges, and we have faced each one with determination and compassion.
 
This year, thousands of people have been stepping up as we continue to navigate the pandemic: first responders, health care professionals, educators, business owners, and volunteers who sewed masks and distributed them out of their homes.
 
And then in February, we had one of the snowiest months in our history. The entire population of Pea Ridge lost natural gas. Gurdon’s twenty-one inches of snow was the most in the state, and in Little Rock, the fifteen inches tied a 103-year-old record.
 
Just as you would expect, Arkansans complied with the requests from utility companies to reduce consumption of natural gas and electricity. Crews spent a week away from home, working in the cold to clear roads. Power company linemen tromped through snowy woods and climbed ice-covered poles to restore electricity. Police officers rescued drivers and worked dozens of accidents on slick roads.
 
And then came the tornadoes this last month. Three weeks ago, I visited communities where tornadoes had destroyed homes, businesses, and a nursing home. In Monette, the nursing home staff stood between windows and their residents. Some used mattresses to protect them. In Trumann, volunteers ran out of room for storing donations.
 
As I toured the towns, we addressed practical matters to ensure they had food, water, and a place to shelter.  But mostly I listened. They’ve lost homes. They’ve lost memories. They expressed heartache, and it was important for me to hear their story. There’s heartache today. There’s going to be heartache a month from now, but they will rebuild.
 
Before Christmas, the president had approved my request for a federal disaster declaration in the counties where the tornadoes struck, and I am grateful for his quick response and for the financial assistance this will mean for the individual homeowners who lost so much.
 
In every crisis our state has endured, Arkansans have set aside their convenience and personal comfort to help. The disasters that strike our state don’t define us. We have defined ourselves as compassionate and generous in the midst of challenge. 
 
12-31-21 3:09 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

The Arkansas General Assembly will convene for the 2022 Fiscal Session on Monday, February 14.

 

Preparations for that session will begin in the next two weeks.

 

Beginning January 11, the Joint Budget Committee will hold a series of meetings designed to begin the process of outlining a budget for the next fiscal year.

 

Budget hearings will begin with the Department of Finance and Administration presenting its annual forecast and recommendations for a balanced budget by the Governor. 

 

The last general revenue report released showed revenue was up 3% from the same time last year.

 

Over the course of the budget hearings, the committee will hear budget requests for all state boards, commissions, and agencies. The hearings will continue through January 20.

 

Members can begin pre-filing appropriation bills on Monday, January 10.

 

Fiscal Sessions began after Arkansas voters approved what would become Amendment 86 in 2008. 

 

Amendment 86 reduced the period for which appropriation bills are valid from two fiscal years to one, requiring the General Assembly to meet in a fiscal session during even-numbered years, with deliberations limited to action on appropriation bills.

 

For non-appropriation legislation to be introduced, a concurrent resolution substantially describing the bill must be approved by a 2/3 vote required in both chambers. The deadline for members to file identical resolutions for non-appropriation bills is February 14.

 

Amendment 86 states that each fiscal session shall not exceed 30 days. The fiscal session may be extended one time, however, for no more than 15 days, by a ¾ vote of both the House and Senate.

 

The deadline for filing both appropriation bills and non-appropriation bills is Monday, February 28.

 

You can watch find the daily agendas and watch the meetings live at www.arkansashouse.org.

 

12-31-21 2:56 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Adapting to the Evolving Needs of Arkansans

 

When we hear the latest from Washington each day, it is easy to get distracted by the drama of disagreements. But what you don’t usually see on the news are the things we agree on, and the work behind the scenes that truly touches families and hardworking Arkansans.

 

Looking back on 2021, I’m proud of the work my staff and I did to strengthen veterans services, expand Arkansas’s role in support of our national defense and protect the metropolitan area classification that communities in our state rely on for federal resources and economic opportunity.

 

These initiatives improve lives and are an example of what we can accomplish in Washington when we find common ground.

 

Beyond the legislative work, I am most proud of how my office has helped thousands of Arkansans directly in an extremely challenging year. Serving people has always been one of my top priorities, from my career as an optometrist to my time in public office. In 2021, my office received 3,480 requests for help with federal agencies and each month brought new questions, problems and roadblocks to help overcome.

 

The bulk of requests this year reflect that we are still wrestling with the aftermath of 2020 and the echo of broad shutdowns that continue to impact government agencies at every level. The challenges were especially clear during the summer’s passport debacle and the ongoing struggles of the IRS. Those are areas where 2020 finally caught up with us – backlogs of applications, increased demand and many government offices still working remotely. The latter issue is something I continue calling on federal agency leaders to address by returning employees back to the office.

 

Over the summer, the Passport Agency started reopening facilities when it was crushed with historic pent-up demand for business and education travel in addition to reunions among families who had been separated for far too long. Between May and July alone, more than 250 Arkansans reached out for assistance getting urgent passports. We helped them navigate a system that changed daily and pushed through emergencies that the bureaucracy could not handle. As we end the year, processing times are not back to normal, but the agency is handling applications smoothly and we are able to offer more direct assistance for emergencies.

 

Unlike passports, the challenges with the IRS backlog continue as some Arkansans are still waiting for their 2020 tax refunds. In a typical year, I only receive a handful of requests for help with delayed tax refunds and other IRS issues. In 2021, we received 395 calls for IRS assistance. These were mostly from Arkansans fighting to get a tax return processed and many who are still seeking their Economic Impact Payments. This is a problem I will continue working to resolve in the year ahead.

 

Despite the unique difficulties Arkansans faced in 2021, I remain optimistic because of the spirit and resilience I’ve seen across the state. Over the last 12 months I’ve had the honor of visiting people in their businesses, farms, service organizations, schools and countless other places where Arkansans are finding creative solutions and rising to the occasion in support of their neighbors.

 

As we end this year, I am inspired by everyone who looks around their community and asks, “How can I help?” I will continue to do my best to keep that question in mind for my work at the federal level and ensure that my office is a place Arkansans can turn to when in need of assistance.

 

12-31-21 2:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

State Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

December 31, 2021

 

LITTLE ROCK – When the new year begins, the Arkansas Works program will have a new name and will operate under new rules.

 

ARHOME is the new Medicaid program. Unlike the previous program, it will focus on specific groups, such as pregnant women, residents of rural areas who suffer from mental illness or who have a history of drug abuse, people with chronic disease and young people who are veterans or who lived in foster homes.

 

Their health insurance carriers will have to meet specific goals. If not, they will have to follow an action plan designed to improve performance, or face financial penalties in 2023. Earlier in December a panel of legislators and health officials approved a set of goals that medical providers must reach.

 

Arkansas Works was the name of the state’s Medicaid expansion plan. It covered 319,000 people between the ages of 19 and 64 last year. They are not enrolled in Medicare and they earn less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level, but more than 16 percent.

 

About 10 years ago people in that income range earned too much money to qualify for traditional Medicaid, which provides government-subsidized health coverage for low-income families. They became eligible under the national Affordable Care Act, which every state implemented in its own way.

 

Rather than simply expand the eligibility criteria for traditional Medicaid, Arkansas covered the new group of enrollees under an innovative plan that relies on private health insurance.

 

At first it was called the private option. It became known as Arkansas Works after the legislature changed the rules to require recipients to work, or look for work, in order to qualify.

 

Other states also had work requirements too, but they all were stricken by the federal courts after legal challenges.

 

Like the private option and Arkansas Works, ARHOME will use Medicaid funding to purchase private health insurance for individuals who qualify financially.

 

In response to the federal courts striking down the work requirement, ARHOME will have a new incentive to encourage recipients to look for a job. If participants fail to look for work, they will be transferred out of private insurance and into the traditional Medicaid program, which doesn’t provide as many benefits.

 

Health officials are excited about the maternal care that ARHOME will provide women and their newborn children. Medical teams will have incentives to identify and care for women whose pregnancies are high risk, through home visits during the pregnancies and until the newborn is two years old.

 

The expectation is that the home visits will reduce infant mortality, and increase the percentage of infants who are fully immunized against chronic and deadly diseases.

 

Officials at the Department of Human Services count on ARHOME being more financially efficient. Last fiscal year, Arkansas Works spent $2.46 billion. Of that amount, 90 percent came from the federal government and 10 percent was appropriated by state government.

 

Improving the health of high-risk populations should hold down the cost of providing medical coverage through Medicaid.

 

Parts of ARHOME are designed to lift young people out of poverty, which would benefit the state’s long-term fiscal condition.

 

12-31-21 2:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG

Polk County Sheriff's Log for December 20TH - 26TH

SHERIFF’S LOG

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of December 20, 2021 – December 26, 2021. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

 

December 20, 2021

An altercation in the area of Hwy 8 East and Ransom Road led to the arrest of Shawn Holliday on charges of Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Resisting Arrest, Obstructing Governmental Operations and Disorderly Conduct.

Deputies were dispatched to an address on Sanders Lane near Potter for a welfare check.

Danielle Stewart, 30 of Mena was arrested on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant.

Donnie Jennings, 44 of Waldron was arrested on Felony Warrant for Possession of Methamphetamine or Cocaine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Firearm by Certain Persons and Simultaneous Possession of Drugs and Firearms as well as charges of 3rd Degree Domestic Battery and Fleeing in a Vehicle.

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 73 near Ink in reference to a welfare check.

 

December 21, 2021

No reports filed.

 

December 22, 2021

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Polk 68 near Cherry Hill in reference to a theft.

Jared Goodearle, 33 of Sallisaw, OK was arrested on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant.

 

December 23, 2021

No reports filed.

 

December 24, 2021

Deputies were dispatched to a residence on Hwy 375 W near Potter in reference to a welfare check.

Dawnylle Boutwell, 52 of Cove was arrested on a Felony Failure to Appear Warrant.

 

December 25, 2021

No reports filed.

 

December 26, 2021

Deputies responded to a structure fire on Polk 59 near Board Camp.

William Williams, 41 of Mena was arrested on a Misdemeanor Warrant for Violation of a Protection Order.

 

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked 3 vehicle accidents this week.

 

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 19 Incarcerated Inmates, with 11 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC21-01058

 

12-28-21 10:06 a.m. KAWX.ORG

Mena Police Report for December 19TH - 25TH

Mena Police Department reports for the week of December 19th through December 25th, 2021

 

December 19

Ashley Gutierrez, 19, was charged with Disorderly Conduct at Janssen Park.

 

December 20

Derek Tarkinton, 29, was charged with Driving on Suspended License, Possession of Schedule Meth, Possession of Schedule Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Firearm by Certain Persons, Simultaneous Possession of Drugs and Firearms, and served with a warrant after a stop at EZ Mart.

 

A report of theft of a vehicle was taken from a residence on Sarah Way.

 

December 21

A theft report was taken from a walk-in complainant.

 

A theft of a vehicle report was taken form a complainant.

 

A report was taken of a vehicle striking a pedestrian at Wal-Mart.

 

December 22

A report was taken of criminal mischief was taken from a residence on Hornbeck.

 

A death investigation report was taken from a residence on Cherry Street.

 

December 23

Danielle Brewer, 27, was served with a warrant for Disorderly Conduct at the Mena Police Department.

 

December 24

Shane Hogan, 32, was served with a warrant for Body attachment at the Mena Police Department.

 

A report of trespassing was taken on Himes Street.

 

Windal Loyd, 41, was charged with Public Intoxication after a stop on Tenth Street.

 

December 25

No reports were taken.

 

All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

12-27-21 11:51 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

Mena Weather