KAWX News Archives for 2019-05

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: The Flood of 2019

 
LITTLE ROCK – Today I want to talk about the Arkansas River as its water levels continue to rise and threaten thousands of people who live and work along its banks. This is a river flood unlike any we have ever seen.
 
For more than a week, we have been tracking the river since it flooded towns in eastern Oklahoma. Neighbors have helped each other fill sandbags to protect homes in Fort Smith and Van Buren. And as the water moves downstream, the floodwaters have forced over 12 highways across the state to close.
 
We are witnessing the force of nature, but we are not helpless. With the leadership of the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management, the Arkansas National Guard, the Arkansas State Police, and the Civil Air Patrol, we are in the business of mitigation, minimizing the loss of life and damage to property. The Corps of Engineers has kept us abreast of developments so that we know where to deploy people and sandbags. At the request of emergency management, I have allocated $350,000 in emergency funds so that our counties and cities can respond to immediate needs. I’ve also asked for emergency federal assistance.
 
I have driven through miles of flooded land, and I have flown over hundreds of acres of floodwaters. The magnitude of devastation is hard to put into words. Every house that I saw underwater, and every business with water at the front door, represents people who have suffered great loss. This flood has altered the life story of so many.
 
We still don’t know how our state will look when this is over. There’s still a lot of water to come.
 
But as we care for the victims, we already are paying attention to what we can do to improve our efforts in the event of another one. In light of this flood, where do we need to strengthen levees, which levees need to be taller?
 
After the flood of 2016, Perry County officials used their experience and took advantage of a grant to rebuild and fortify their levees. The levees held in the flood of 2019, which was more powerful than before.
 
There is one thing about Arkansas that we can’t much improve or strengthen, and that is the way Arkansans take care of one another. One of the county judges I called this week was out of breath when he answered his phone because he was out filling sandbags. Many employees of local and state agencies gave up their Memorial Day plans in order to keep the rest of us safe. The cooperation among agencies has been textbook perfect and prevented the disaster from being even worse.
 
As I have seen over and over, the people of Arkansas set aside the routines of life to help, whether it’s moving furniture, or filling and stacking sandbags.
 
That’s the great story of the historic Flood of 2019. That’s the history of Arkansas.
 
5-31-19 4:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Whether it is rebuilding a family home or planning for the loss of crops, our state will be recovering from these historic floods for months to come.

 

FEMA just recently announced that federal emergency aid has been made available to Arkansas to supplement state and local response efforts. While our emergency management teams across the state address the immediate needs, we want to direct your attention to several services and advisories being issued by our state agencies.

 

Roads

 

The Arkansas Department of Transportation (ArDOT) has opened a Traveler Information Call Center to assist drivers in navigating around flooded highways.  The call center is available by voice or text at (501)-569-2374 daily between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. You can also download the IDrive Arkansas app for up to date information on road closures.

 

Health

 

The Arkansas Department of Health announced that the ADH Laboratory is waiving well water testing fees for private well owners impacted by the flood.  The department reminds Arkansans that you should not drink from the well until it has been disinfected and tested. You can contact your local health unit for information about testing.

 

Consumer Protection

 

The Arkansas Attorney General’s office is reminding flood victims to beware of “home improvement” loan scams. Scammers may offer to arrange financing or fill out disaster loan applications for a fee. Beware of anyone who offers to inflate the amount of your disaster damage assessment.

Arkansans should also be aware that Act 376 of 1997 prohibits businesses from price gouging during a state of emergency. The law prohibits businesses from charging more than 10 percent above the pre-disaster price of goods or services. The scope of the law is broad and is intended to cover anything that may be needed in the event of a state of emergency. The ban on price gouging remains in effect for at least 30 days and can be extended another 30 days by the local governing body if necessary to protect the lives, property or welfare of the citizens. For home repairs, the law remains in effect for 180 days.

 

Arkansans can file a consumer complaint with the AG’s office online at www.arkansasag.gov or by calling (800) 482-8982.

 

Insurance

 

The Arkansas Insurance Department (AID) announced a 60-day moratorium on the cancellation/non-renewal of policies for the non-payment of premiums by Arkansans affected by the flooding.  This action does not waive the obligation of Arkansans to pay their insurance premiums, it is only an extension of the time period to make your payment without the threat of cancellation.

 

If you have questions about your insurance coverage during the flood call AID Consumer Services at 800-852-5494.

 

5-31-19 4:42 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column: Arkansas Strong

Arkansas Strong

 

The Arkansas River is experiencing historic flooding that has unfortunately resulted in Natural State homes, businesses and communities now finding themselves underwater. The water level has surpassed the record floods of 2015, 1990, 1941 and 1927. What we are facing is unprecedented, however the strength of Arkansas is its people. Arkansans are rising to meet this challenge.

 

As I travel around our state, I have seen the willingness of friends, neighbors and strangers who are helping and supporting Arkansans in need. We can be encouraged by volunteers who filled sandbags to build barriers against the water, businesses that opened their doors to provide families displaced by floods with food and housing and individuals who helped others get to higher ground. The all-hands-on-deck efforts demonstrate how so many communities are eager to assist their families, friends and even strangers in these difficult circumstances. This natural disaster is truly bringing out our best.

 

 

Having spent much of this week visiting communities hard hit by flooding and surveying damage, I am heartened to see the strength and mental fortitude of Arkansans. While we don't yet know the full impact of this disaster, it is considerable. President Trump issued an emergency declaration for Arkansas, allowing the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide assistance for emergency protective measures for 16 counties spanning across our state.

 

 

On Thursday, Governor Asa Hutchinson invited members of the Arkansas Congressional Delegation to participate in an aerial tour of flooding across the state. We saw the scope of the disaster at Toad Suck, Dardanelle, Ozark, Trimble Lock and Dam, Van Buren and Fort Smith. Having grown up in Fort Smith, I’ve never seen water levels in the community this high.

 

 

The power of Mother Nature is truly remarkable. This continues to be a dangerous situation and we are fortunate to have the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management, law enforcement, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Arkansas National Guard and many other organizations and individuals who are closely monitoring the water levels, levees and dams and are ready to respond to potential emergencies. President Trump recognized these efforts, tweeting that Arkansas’s “local officials are doing a great job” in responding to the flooding.

 

 

I have been in close contact with state and local leaders and have maintained an open line of communication with the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management (ADEM). Personnel are working extended shifts in order to keep residents safe. I appreciate their tireless efforts to respond to this historic natural disaster. 

 

This is one of the worst natural disasters in our state’s history, but we can be proud of the resolve that Arkansans have demonstrated to face this challenge. There is a long road ahead to recovery and my office stands ready to help. Federal government resources are critical in the immediate aftermath of this devastating event. I’m committed to ensuring the federal response is appropriate and timely.

 

My staff and I will continue to support the needs of our state as we get through this disaster and lead coordination between the federal government and state and local officials that will be necessary for recovery and rebuilding.

 

5-31-19 2:14 p.m. KWXA.ORG 

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Weekend Activities at QWSP Near Mena, June 1st and 2nd

For more information about the weekend activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena, dial (479) 394-2863.

 

 

Saturday, June 1 Peak to Peak Poker Run starting at 8:00 am and lasting until completed. Meet at QWSP. 

 

Sunday, June 2 Wonder House Tour starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Home Sweet Home starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet at  Lovers’ Leap Trailhead. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a hike through our neighbors’ homes. Learn of all the different animals and their habitats as we hike at Queen Wilhelmina. We will start on the north side of the Lovers’ Leap trail.

 

Arkansas Furs starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet in the Hearth Room. What animals do we have here at Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will talk about the animals that we have here in the park and you will get to feel their furs.

 

5-31-19 10:15 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

May 31, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – Elementary school students in Arkansas will get at least 40 minutes a day of recess under legislation approved earlier this year by the General Assembly.

 

Act 641 of 2019 amends state law concerning the school day. It requires at least 40 minutes of each day be used for recess, which will be outdoors when the weather allows. Recess will be unstructured, although of course it will be supervised.

 

Recess includes opportunities for free play and vigorous physical activity, whether it takes place inside or outside.

 

Why was it necessary for lawmakers to guarantee a certain amount of time for children to play? And why did lawmakers feel the need to define recess? To anyone over a certain age, it seems ridiculous.

 

That’s why Act 641 recognizes what has occurred in the classroom over the past few decades, during which numerous instructional requirements have been added to the typical school schedule.

 

“Educational leaders cannot allow for a sufficient amount of time in the school day for recess within the current construct of the instructional requirements and time allotted in a school day,” the act reads. The consequence is that students have decreased focus on academics, and fewer opportunities to develop social skills with their fellow students.

 

Among the valuable lessons that young children learn in school is how to engage with each other, thus increasing their social awareness. Much of this learning takes place during recess.

 

Schools may apply for a waiver from the state Education Department, but they must propose an alternative allowing children social time that is either structured or unstructured.

 

Each year the Education Department will report to the legislative Senate and House Education Committees the schools that have been granted a waiver.

 

The act was approved easily during the regular session, passing the House by a vote of 90-to-0 and the Senate by a vote of 34-to-0.

 

Act 641 is one of many ways in which adults are trying to change a social trend that has seen children spending more time sitting in front of a screen. It may be a television, a video game, a cell phone or a computer monitor.

 

One example is Play 60, a program sponsored by the National Football League. NFL players join non-profit organizations, children’s hospitals and schools to encourage children to be active for at least 60 minutes a day.

 

Children learn about nature through hikes and field trips sponsored by hunting, fishing and conservation organizations.

 

The preamble of Act 641 summarizes the consensus among adults, that children “need more opportunities for physical activity during the school day in order to promote healthy and active lifestyles.”

 

Another new law passed earlier this year will affect high school students. Act 617 of 2019 repeals the requirement that when teenagers apply for a driver’s license, they must show proof that they have a grade point average of at least a C.

 

Under Act 617, when teenagers pass the written test their score will be valid for two years. That gives them more time to pass the driving portion of the test.

 

5-31-19 9:11 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Arkansas Delegation Applauds Emergency Declaration for State from Flooding and Severe Storms

WASHINGTON - U.S. Senators John Boozman and Tom Cotton—along with Congressmen Rick Crawford, French Hill, Steve Womack and Bruce Westerman—announced that President Donald Trump has issued an emergency declaration for Arkansas, allowing the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide assistance for emergency protective measures for 16 counties: Arkansas, Chicot, Conway, Crawford, Desha, Faulkner, Franklin, Jefferson, Johnson, Lincoln, Logan, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Sebastian and Yell.

“We are pleased with President Trump’s quick response for federal assistance to Arkansas. This declaration is critical to protecting Arkansans, preventing further damage and improving public safety,” members said.

On Wednesday, the Arkansas Congressional Delegation wrote a letter to President Trump and other administration officials urging them to support Governor Asa Hutchinson’s call for an emergency declaration. Read the delegation’s letter of support here.

 

5-31-19 9:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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June Activities at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area Near Wickes

 

For more information about any of the activities scheduled for June at Cossatot River State Park-Natureal Area near Wickes, call the park at (870) 385-2201.

 

 Saturday, June 01

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

Sunday, June 02

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6.

Meeting Place: Sandbar Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Plants to Pantry (1 hour) The Grist Mills used in communities surrounding Cossatot River State Park- Natural Area provided food to Arkansans by taking grains from the plant to the pantry. Visit with Park Interpreter Carson to see a grist mill and learn how it operates.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

Saturday, June 08

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

Sunday, June 09

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

Tuesday – Friday, June 11-14

S.W.A.T. Overnight Camp (9-13 year olds)

The Southwest Arkansas Tour is a great way to discover some of Southwest Arkansas’ State Parks. Campers will discover the resources that make each park unique by enjoying archery, hiking, kayaking, campfire cooking, tent camping and more. Join park interpreters to enjoy many activities, make new friends, and discover what makes Southwest Arkansas so special.

 

Registration provides a gift bag, meals, daily snacks, gear rental and transportation. Space is limited, for more information and reservations please call (870) 385-2201.

Meeting Place: TBD.

Admission: $125 + tax per camper.

Registration deadline: June 5, 2019.

 

Saturday, June 15

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Sunday, June 16

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6.

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Hiss, Rattle and Roll (1 hour) Join park interpreter and meet a few of the snakes that live in Arkansas. We will discover the characteristics of the dangerous six and be able to tell them apart from harmless snakes. Games and activities will conclude the presentation.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

Saturday, June 22

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Sunday, June 23

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6.

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Cossatot Craft Corner (1 hour) Do you enjoy being creative? Would you like to begin earning an explorer badge? Join park interpreter to use your creativity, have fun, and discover something special that can be found in the park.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

Friday, June 28

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Saturday, June 29

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Guided Kayak Tour (7 hours) A park interpreter will be your guide on this fun-filled trip down the beautiful Cossatot River! Kayak adventure tours are designed for beginners, but all ability levels are welcome. The park provides kayaks, paddles, helmets, and life jackets. Transportation to and from the Park Visitor Center is provided at no additional cost.

Please note: Inclement weather or river conditions may cause the park to cancel the tour. Payment is required upon arrival. Reservations are made on a first come, first served basis. Cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance. Questions? Call 870-385-2201.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center. Cost: $30.60/person

 

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center.

 

Sunday, June 30

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Clue in to Cossatot (varies) Stay for a minute or an hour –it’s up to you. Each time slot offers a different adventure just waiting to be discovered! Will it be snorkeling? skins and skulls? marvelous macros? nature crafts? Clue in and find out! All activities are free and open to all ages. Find a park interpreter at river access areas during the day to join in on the fun!

Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls’ Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.

Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. Snorkeling Exploration (1 hour) Join park interpreter(s) as we snorkel a section of the Cossatot River and observe the underwater life while enjoying the clean, clear, cool water. Snorkel equipment provided. Wear appropriate clothing for swimming, Minimum age is 6.

Meeting Place: Low Water Bridge below Visitor Center. 

 

5-31-19 8:30 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for May 29, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

5-29-19 2:30 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena School Board May Meeting Held

The Mena School Board met Tuesday for their regular monthly meeting.

 
The Board heard a report that the construction project at Louise Durham Elementary came in under budget by almost $23,000.
 
School lunches and breakfasts will be going up for the 2019-2020 school year. Adults will pay $3.70 for lunches and $2.35 for breakfasts, and students will pay $2.75 for lunches and $1.70 for breakfasts.
 
Reports were given my Danny Minton about summer maintenance projects, Jeanne Smith about the Polk County Virtual Academy, and Paulette Sherrer District Administrative PLC Team that she leads. 
 
The 2019-2020 emphasis for the district will be on "striving for excellence through a guaranteed and viable curriculum in each classroom". 
 
The new Mena High School principal, David Maxwell, will begin work June 3rd.
 
The board accepted the resignation of Lori Lyle and Jordan Poole.
 
Employee transfers were approved including Susan McKeever to Pre-K Para Professional at Louise Durham Elementary and Heather Goss to Junior, Girls High Basketball Coach.
 
Janet Batten requested that her resignation be rescinded, and the board acted accordingly.
 
New hires for the district include Jessica McAnulty as the K-5 Elementary Music Teacher and Malani Vega as a Pre-K Para Professional at Louise Durham Elementary.

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Quorum Court Holds May Meeting

The Polk County Quorum Court met Tuesday, May 28th for their regular monthly meeting. All eleven Justices of the Peace were in attendance, as well as other elected officials and citizens.

 
The Quorum Court took care of routine business including of approval of minutes from the last meeting.
 
The ordinance that was approved last month concerning a county owned cadaver cooler to be kept by Coroner Brian Bowser at his place of business was reviewed. 
 
County Judge Brandon Ellison reported to the JPs that the cadaver cooler that had been used for some years had been sold. Last month the Court approved a plan for the cooler to be appraised then advertised for sale. The old cooler was appraised at $3,300.00. There were two bids but only one from a qualified bidder, and the one bid met the state law requirement of being at least 75% of the appraised value, which would need to be at least $2475.00. The bid was for $2,500.00 and placed by Beasley Wood Funeral Home.
 
Judge Ellison also reported that a new, more portable cadaver cooler had been ordered at a total cost of $7,071.00.
 
Polk County Extension Agent Sherry Beaty-Sullivan introduced the new Polk County 4-H Agent to the Court, Becky Sterner. Sterner is from Mena and gradated from Mena High School. After graduating from the University of Arkansas she worked for the Extension Service in Hot Spring County.
 
The next Quorum Court meeting will me June 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. in the Quorum Court Meeting Room at the Polk County Office Building (old hospital) on Pine Street in Mena. Quorum Court meetings are open to the public.
 
5-28-19 8:57 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Planned Power Outage For East Polk County Residents June 1st at 11:00 p.m.

Rich Mountain Electric Cooperative customers in the Cherry Hill, Opal, Southside Road, Big Fork , Board Camp, Nunley, Ink and Yocana areas should plan to be without power for a couple of hours starting at 11:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 1, 2019.

 
The planned outage is to allow work to be performed at substation and on some lines.
 
The planned outage will be rescheduled if there is inclement weather. 
 
For more information, contact RMEC at (479) 394-4140 or 1-877-828-4074.
 
5-28 19 8:35 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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ARDOT Opens Call Center For Road Information, Closings (501) 569-2374

ARDOT Opens Traveler Information Call Center to Assist Motorists Navigate Arkansas Highways during Historic Flooding

 

LITTLE ROCK (5-28) – The Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT) proactively opened a Traveler Information Call Center to assist motorists navigate around flooded highways throughout Arkansas.

 

ARDOT’s Traveler Information Call Center opened at 3:00 p.m. today, May 28, and is available by voice or text at (501) 569-2374 daily between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. The Traveler Information Call Center is located at ARDOT’s Central Offices and staffed by Department personnel volunteering for 4 hours at a time, minimally impacting their daily duties.

 

“We always recommend motorists check IDriveArkansas.com before leaving home,” said ARDOT Director Scott Bennett. “Opening the Traveler Information Call Center as this historic flood makes its way through the State just gives more opportunities for motorists to plan their travel through Arkansas in a safe and efficient manner.”

 

Additional travel information can be found at IDriveArkansas.com, a free download in all app stores, or ARDOT.gov. You can also follow us on Twitter @myARDOT.

 

5-28-19 3:23 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Fishing Derbies Scheduled at Oden, Mt. Ida and Other Locations

Fishing derbies announced throughout Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests

 

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – The U.S. Forest Service, along with State and local partners are sponsoring free fishing derbies throughout the Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests.

 

The following is a list of scheduled fishing derbies along with the date, times and other information: 

 

Ouachita National Forest

 

Caddo/Womble Ranger District, Mt. Ida, Arkansas

 

Location:  

Womble Pond

Date of Derby: 

June 8

Time Registration Starts: 

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

8:30 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

11 a.m.

Age Group: 

Ages 12 and under 

Contact Phone Number:

870-867-2101

Other Information:

Prizes will be awarded, hot dogs served at 10:30 a.m.

Partners:                               

 

 

Arkansas Game and Fish, Magic Bait, Fast Signs, Subway, Joplin Store, Wal-Mart, Trader Bills, Geared, True Value of Mount Ida, Chris Elder Auto, and Bass Pro Shop

                                                                                                       

Jessieville-Winona-Fourche District, Jessieville, Arkansas

 

Location:  

Jessieville Work Center Pond

Date of Derby: 

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts: 

7 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

7:30 a.m.

Time Event Ends:

10 a.m.

Age Group: 

15 and under

Restroom Availability:

Yes                                          

Handicap Access:

Yes

Drinking Water Available:

No

Contact Persons:

Gabe Oseguera

Contact Phone Number:

(501) 984-5313

Partners:

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Hot Springs Village Anglers Club, Magic Bait, Tim McDonald, Cosby Logging and U.S. Forest Service

Other Information:

The pond has a handicapped accessible pier.

 

Mena/Oden Ranger District, Oden, Arkansas

 

Location:

Oden Rifle Range Pond

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts:

7 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

10:30 a.m.

Age Group:

2 – 15 years-old

Contact Phone Number:

479-394-2382

Other Information:

Prizes to be awarded.

Partners:

Arkansas Game and Fish, Magic Bait, Oden Wood and Water Club, U.S. Forest Service

 

Oklahoma Ranger District, Talihina, Oklahoma

 

Location:                                          

Talihina Veterans Center Pond

Date of Derby

Sat., June 1

Time Registration Starts:

7 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts: 

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

12 p.m.

Age Group:

Ages 3 - 16

Restroom Availability:

Yes

Handicap Access:  

Yes

Contact Phone Number:

918-653-2991 ext.115

Partners: 

Talihina Lion’s Club, Magic Baits, and U.S. Forest Service

 

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests

 

Big Piney Ranger District, Deer, Arkansas

 

Location:

Deer Pond, Deer, AR

Date of Derby: 

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts: 

8:30 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

9 a.m.

Time Event Ends:

12 p.m.

Age Group:

15 and under

Restroom Availability:

Yes (portable toilets)

Contact Persons:

Sarah Davis

Contact Phone Number:

870-446-5122

Partners:

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission 

Location:

All hooks out of the water at 11 a.m.  Participation awards and contest prizes will be presented at 11 a.m. 

Other Information:

All hooks out of the water at 11 a.m.  Participation awards and contest prizes will be presented at 11 a.m.

 

Big Piney Ranger District, Jasper, Arkansas

 

Location

Little Buffalo (Bradley Park), Jasper, AR

Date of Derby:   

Sat, June 29 during the Elk Festival

Time Registration:             

Starts: 8:30 a.m.

Time Fishing:                      

Starts: 9 a.m.

Time Event Ends:               

11 a.m.

Age Group:                          

12 and under

Restroom Availability:      

Yes

Contact Persons:               

Sarah Davis

Contact Phone Number:

870-446-5122

Partners:

Newton County Chamber of Commerce, Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and local businesses

Other Information:

All hooks out of the water at 11 a.m. Participants that catch the biggest fish and heaviest stringer will win prizes. Winners will be announced 12 p.m.

 

Boston Mountain Ranger District, Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

Location:

Lake Wedington

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 22nd

Time Registration Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

9 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

11 a.m.

Age Group:

12 and under

Restroom Availability:

Yes (flush toilets)

Drinking Water Available:

Yes

Contact Person(s):

Matt Lark or Jessie Rogers

Contact Phone Number:

479-667-2191

Partners

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Forest Service, local businesses

Other Information:

All hooks out of the water by 11 a.m.  Awards will be presented for the biggest fish and heaviest stringer and for casting contest winners. 

 

Mt. Magazine Ranger District, Paris, Arkansas

 

Location:  

Cove Lake, Campground Loop A.

Date of Derby: 

June 8

Time Registration Starts: 

Participants must be pre-registered.

Time Fishing Starts:

8:30 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

10 a.m.

Age Group: 

4 to 9

Contact Person(s):

Mindi Lawson or Carla Pfeiffer

Contact Phone Number:

479-963-3076

Partners:

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, National Wild Turkey Federation, Paris Rotary Club

Other Information:

All hooks out of the water at 10 a.m.  There is a 2 fish limit. 

Awards will be presented for the heaviest 2 fish (1st, 2nd, and 3rd place in each age class: 4-6, 7 - 9) and for the smallest fish and for Albino or tagged fish.  There will be numerous random prizes.  

 

Pleasant Hill Ranger District, Clarksville, Arkansas

 

Location:

Gillian Pond

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 1

Time Registration Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

9 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

11 a.m.

Age Group:

12 and under

Restroom Availability:

Yes (portable toilets)

Drinking Water Available:

Yes

Contact Person(s):

Greg Taylor or Jason Engle

Contact Phone Number:

479-754-2864

Partners:

Clarksville Kiwanis Club, Clarksville Wal-Mart, Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Forest Service

Other Information:

All hooks out of the water by 11 a.m.  Awards will be presented for the heaviest fish, smallest fish, heaviest stringer and for casting contest winners.  In addition, there will be random prize drawings during the event.

 

St. Francis Ranger District, Marianna, Arkansas

 

Location #1:

Ranger Pond,  Mississippi River State Park

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts:

7 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

10 a.m.

Age Group:

For Children 12 and under

Restroom Availability:

Yes

Handicap Access:

Yes

Drinking Water Available:

Yes

Contact Person:

Terri Vanderford

Contact Phone Number:

870-295-5278 ext. 5244

Partners:

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, Arkansas State Parks, Lee County Conservation District, Marianna Chamber of Commerce. 

Other Information:

First 125 Participants to register receive a free camp chair.

 

St. Francis Ranger District, Marianna, Arkansas

 

Location #2:

Storm Creek Lake - Swimming Area,  Mississippi River State Park

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts:

7 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

11 a.m.

Age Group:

For Children Ages 4 - 12

Restroom Availability:

Yes

Handicap Access:

Yes

Drinking Water Available:

Yes

Contact Person:

Terri Vanderford

Contact Phone Number:

870-295-5278 ext. 5244

Partners:

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, Arkansas State Parks, Phillips County Businesses

Other Information:

Poles only, no rod and reels.

 

Sylamore Ranger District, Mountain View, Arkansas

 

Location:

Mirror Lake, Blanchard Springs Recreation Area

Date of Derby:

Sat, June 8

Time Registration Starts:

8 a.m.

Time Fishing Starts:

9 a.m.

Time Fishing Ends:

11 a.m.

Age Group:

Ages 4 - 12 (Children must be accompanied by an adult)

Restroom Availability:

Yes (recreation site)

Handicap Access:

Yes

Drinking Water Available:

Yes

Contact Person:

Idun Guenther

Contact Phone Number:

870-269-3228 ext. 3247

Partners:

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, AMVETS #7, VFW #4766, American Legion #43, Riders United 4 Children, U.S. Forest Service and local businesses. 

Other Information:

Weigh in will begin at 11 a.m.  Trophies will be given for largest fish in three age categories: 4-6 years old, 7-9 years old, and 10-12.  There will be a general raffle for prizes for other registered participants. There is a three trout limit.  Participants should be old enough to hold the pole themselves and are limited to one pole each.  Some Trout bait will be provided.

 

Please note that Mirror Lake will be closed from June 6 at 10 a.m. through June 8 at 12 p.m. for the fishing derby.

 

5-28-19 1:59 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For May 20th - 26th

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of May 20 - May 26, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


May 20, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 47 near Shady Grove of the break-in and theft of firearms, ammunition and electronics, all valued at $2,200.00.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 710 near Potter of a possible gunshot victim.  Deputies responded.  Investigation continues.
Report from a Mena woman of issues concerning child custody exchange.
Report from a Mena man of problems regarding child custody exchange.
Report from complainant on Gardenia Lane near Potter of the discovery of a suspicious item on their property.  Investigation continues.
Report of a single-vehicle accident on Polk 647 near Mena that damaged two mailboxes.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Tatum K. A. Veal, 28, of Mena, on Warrants for Felony Failure to Appear, Theft of Property and a Montgomery County Warrant.


May 21, 2019
Report from Mena Regional Health System of an assault victim.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 22, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 87 near Ink of the theft of a firearm, valued at $500.00.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 178 near Mena of damage done to their property by an unknown vehicle.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 70 near Acorn of the theft of camping accessories, all valued at $300.00.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Deer Park Lane near Mena of a missing mailbox.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Heidi M. Wilson, 42, of Kansas City, KS, on a Child Support Warrant.


May 23, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Mena of finding a bicycle on their property that didn’t belong to them.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Rocky of a person taking their vehicle without permission led to the arrest of Thomas L.Kidwell, 40, of Mena, on a Charge of Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle and a Warrant for Bond Revocation.
Report from complainant on Polk 26 near Hatfield of the theft of a trailer, valued at $1,000.00. Investigation continues.


May 24, 2019
Traffic stop on Highway 4 West near Cove led to the arrest of Fernando Ochoa, Jr., 37, of Smithville, OK, on Charges of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License, No Liability Insurance, No Vehicle License, No Seatbelt and Resisting Arrest.
Traffic stop on Polk 74 near Ink.  Both suspects fled from the scene.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 25, 2019
Report from a Mena man of problems regarding child custody exchange.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Paula K. Schuller, 48, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Kelly W. McCarley, 40, of Wickes, on Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order and four counts of Failure to Appear.


May 26, 2019
Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 6 near Wickes led to the arrest of Lorna M. Sullivan, 33, of Hatfield, on a Charge of Domestic Battery 3rd Degree.
Report from complainant on Settlers Lane near Potter of an unauthorized person at their property.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked one vehicle accident this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 26 Incarcerated Inmates , with 13 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00387

 

5-28-19 1:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Department Report for May 19th - 25th

 

 

Mena Police Department Reports for the Week of May 19, 2019 through May 25, 2019

 

May 19, 2019

 

Jenna E. Myles, 20, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct after officers responded to a call at a local residence.

 

May 20, 2019

 

Mykos Pierce, 20, of Mena was charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor after officers were called to a disturbance on the parking lot at a local retail store.

 

A local woman reported that she is being harassed by an acquaintance.  Case is pending.

 

May 21,2019

 

Employees at a local car part store reported a person who was being a nuisance and would not leave.  No charges have been filed at this time, but the suspect was cautioned not to return to the store.

 

A Mena man filed a complaint against his girlfriend, claiming she is harassing him.  No charges were filed.

 

May 22, 2019

 

David Sinyard, 43, of Mena was charged with inhaling an intoxicant after officers responded to a complaint regarding a suspicious person in a local neighborhood.

 

Rachel Denise Crow, 39, of Mena was charged with shoplifting following a call to a local retail store.

 

May 23, 2019

 

Van Holman, 26, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance.  Holman was also served an outstanding arrest warrant.

 

May 24, 2019

 

Report was made of a local woman trespassing at a local retail store.  Case is pending location and interview of suspects and surveillance tapes.

 

May 25, 2019

 

A Mena woman reported that someone had stolen her debit card and had attempted to use it.  Case is pending.

 

Cheyenne Nicole Smith, 25,  was served an outstanding warrant.

 

5-28-19 10:10 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson Declares a State of Emergency Ahead of Flooding

LITTLE ROCK –  Governor Asa Hutchinson has declared a State of Emergency for Arkansas in anticipation of severe flooding along the Arkansas River in the coming week. 
 
You can find the Executive Order, EO 19-05, HERE.
 
Earlier, Governor Hutchinson directed Arkansas National Guard General Mark Berry to deploy 26 members of the Arkansas Guard in anticipation of the flooding. Two high-water-rescue teams will be stationed in western Arkansas by Saturday morning and will move southeast with the floodwaters. The Governor will direct the deployment of more guardsmen as needed. 
 
The Arkansas River is expected to crest at record levels this weekend and continue through next week. The Governor encourages Arkansans to stay alert and heed the warnings of local emergency management officials.
 
5-24-19 8:14 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Finding Common Ground on Health Care Reform

 

The average American spends over $10,000 annually on health care expenses and experts expect that number to continue to rise. Combine that hefty price tag with the very personal nature of health care decisions, and you easily see why health care reform is a priority for millions of Americans.

 

There are a number of competing ideas on how to fix our broken health care system. Thankfully, the Medicare-For-All, more accurately described as Medicare-For-None, approach being pushed in the U.S. House of Representatives is not going anywhere in the Senate. Leader McConnell and my Republican colleagues understand that any plan that will force Americans to pay more to wait longer for inferior services is not a workable solution to our health care woes.

 

Can a divided Congress with such divergent views on health care reform pass meaningful reforms in this climate? I believe we can. The key will be to focus on smaller, bipartisan pieces of legislation that will provide relief to families from rising health care costs, improve patient outcomes and ensure access to quality and affordable care.

 

To that end, I have introduced two bills that would be perfect places from which to start.

 

First, I joined with Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ) to propose a solution to the physician shortage crisis our nation is facing. Our bill, the Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act, would ease the arbitrary cap on the number of Medicare-funded graduate medical education (GME) positions imposed by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

 

The number of available physicians per population in the Natural State is among the lowest in the nation and providers of all specialties are facing a serious shortfall, especially in Arkansas’s rural communities. Lifting this antiquated cap on training slots for medical school graduates is a perfect example of a small reform that can make a big difference.

 

Similarly, another seemingly easy lift that would net positive returns would be to enable physician extenders to play a larger role in the process. That’s why I introduced legislation to enhance the role of radiology assistants (RAs).

 

The Medicare Access to Radiology Care Act would enable radiologists to submit claims to Medicare for non-diagnostic services performed by RAs they directly supervise in both the hospital and office setting. It will ensure patients—particularly those in rural areas where health care options are fewer—have timely and quality access to services.

 

I also have lent my support as a cosponsor to a number of bipartisan bills on which Congress should be able to find common ground. One, the Protect Act, reflects the stated intention of every member of Congress. It will ensure that health insurance coverage is available to Americans with pre-existing conditions without unreasonably high premiums or exclusions. We can also come together to reauthorize funding for community health centers, which serve a vital function of providing affordable health care to more than 27 million Americans, to ensure they remain operational. I have cosponsored a bipartisan bill to accomplish this goal. Finally, we can find consensus to repeal the 40 percent excise tax on certain employer-sponsored health insurance that is expected to impact half of employer-based health plans by 2025.

 

Reforms to our health care system require thorough and thoughtful debate. This is especially true for significant policy changes. While that discussion remains ongoing, we can advance commonsense reforms and move closer toward a system that ensures access to affordable, quality care for every American.

 

5-24-19 4:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Memorial Day Weekend Activities at QWSP Near Mena

Friday, May 24

Sunset Art in the Park 8:00 pm lasting about 45 minutes in the Picnic Area. It is time to express yourself! We all have an artist inside, and Queen Wilhelmina is the perfect place to get inspired. Join Park Interpreter Melissa and paint a picture of the sun as it sets on Rich Mountain with water colors.

 

Saturday, May 25

Wonder House Tour 2:00 pm lasting about 30 minutes at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Dutch Oven Demonstration 4:00 pm lasting about 1 hour in the Picnic Area. Are you in need of a tasty treat for this weekend? Stop by Queen Wilhelmina picnic area to find out how much better dessert is cooked over a fire! Park Interpreter Melissa will be using the state vessel – a Dutch oven – to cook-up a simple and delicious dessert. Come by for a taste.

 

S’mores 7:00 pm lasting about 30 minutes in the Picnic Area Did you ever wonder how Smore’s came about? Come join park interpreter Melissa to learn about the history of Smore’s, and try the delicious snack cooked over a campfire! 

 

Sunday, May 26

Unnatural Hike 9:00 am lasting about 30 minutes at the Amphitheater. How attentive do you really think you are? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to test your powers of observation in this fun interesting hidden item hunt along the Spring Trail.

 

Wonder House Tour 10:00 am lasting about 30 minutes at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Volleyball 2:00 pm lasting about 30 minutes at the Volleyball Court. Join Park Interpreter Melissa in an afternoon game of volleyball. No experience needed. Just come and have fun.

 

Edible Insects 4:00 pm lasting about 30 minutes in the Hearth Room Are eating bugs a real thing? Join park interpreter Melissa and see who really eats bugs. If you’re brave enough you can join the “I Ate A Bug Club!” Bring your appetite and take a bite, or come and watch!

 

Monday, May 27

Bird Watching 8:00 am lasting about 1 hour at the North side of Lovers Leap. Whether you’re a beginner or pro at birding, join park interpreter Melissa as we hike to the observation deck. We will be watching for birds along the way. Bring your binoculars and we will see how many birds we can identify.

 

Five-Minute Ice Cream 2:00 pm lasting about 1 hour at thr Amphitheater. Are you trying to beat the spring heat on this holiday week? Do you want a fun way to cool off? Join Park Interpreter Melissa, and learn how to make ice cream in 5 minutes.

 

Bingo 3:30 lasting about 1 hour in the Conference Room. Are you feeling lucky? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we play our annual Memorial Day game of bingo!

 

For more information about any of these activities or the state park, dial (479) 394-2863.

 

5-24-19 4:38 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

It is estimated that less than 15 percent of children who qualify for free or reduced-priced school lunches in Arkansas are getting the same high-quality meals in the summer. Children shouldn’t go hungry just because school is out.

 

That is why the Department of Human Services and the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance partner with schools, churches and community centers across the state to provide meals in the Summer Food Service Program. The program is 100 percent federally funded and covers the cost of up to three nutritious meals and snacks a day for children.

 

Last summer, Arkansas children enjoyed free meals at more than 500 feeding sites across the state. More than 1 million meals and snacks were served.

 

Final site approvals for 2019 are expected in the next few weeks, but organizers expect to exceed last year’s numbers.

 

The meals served follow USDA nutrition guidelines and are paid for by USDA. Many sites offer educational and recreational activities that kids enjoy.

 

Arkansas children 18 years old and younger can receive USDA-supported free summer meals at school, community and faith-based sites across the state that are approved through the Arkansas Department of Human Service’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) or the Arkansas Department of Education’s Seamless Summer Option (SSO) program. Most sites open by June 3 and serve through early August.

 

Parents do not need to apply to the program to get a free summer meal for their kids, and it does not interfere with other benefits they may be receiving. They can simply bring their child to a summer meals site in their community and their kids can eat a healthy, nutritious meal.

 

There are USDA authorized Summer Meals Sites in almost every county in Arkansas. When the last day of school is drawing near, parents and care givers can find a summer meals site in their communities by:

 

 

  • Calling 1-866-3-HUNGRY

 

  • Texting FOOD to 877 877 

 

The site is updated continually as more summer feeding sites are added to the program.

 

5-24-19 4:06 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Coding is Catching On

 
LITTLE ROCK – I’d like to talk about the National Computer Science Summit for State Leaders that we are hosting in Little Rock in a couple of weeks. This is the first summit of its type in the nation. We have invited leaders in the field to discuss a range of topics, including academic standards, teacher training, and the development of computer-science education initiatives in every state.
 
The keynote speaker is Hadi Partovi, who is a leader in the coding movement in the United States and the co-founder with his twin brother, Ali, of Code.org. I’ll also be joined by Governor Kim Reynolds of Iowa.
 
Code.org has recognized Arkansas as a national leader in computer-science education. Hadi and Ali are two of the biggest proponents of teaching students to code. Their goal is for every school in the United States to offer computer science courses. The story of their success at a young age affirms that our initiative to promote computer-science education is the right thing to do.
 
Hadi and Ali were born in Tehran in 1972, eight years before the Iran-Iraq war began. Hadi taught himself to code at home on a Commodore 64 computer because his school didn’t offer a course.
 
After the family moved to the United States, Hadi used his self-taught skills to work summers as a software engineer. The brothers both graduated from Harvard. Hadi says their computer-science education gave them the skills to launch their many successful endeavors. He says that being good at computer programming was a direct path to their success.
 
This summit will give us access to national leaders in the field, and it will allow us to showcase what we are doing in Arkansas.
 
We just wrapped up the third Governor’s Coding Competition, which is one way we are promoting coding, and the competition is one way we demonstrate our coding talent.
 
The team of Karsen Beck, Noah Raby, and William Shaver from the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences, and the Arts took first place. The teams of Bradley Baltz, Lucas Jaggernauth, and Austin Parker, and Owen Bell, Julian Sanker, and Daniel Whitmire, from Haas Hall Academy in Rogers and Fayetteville, won second and third place.
 
The increasing number of schools that compete each year and the caliber of their competitors shows that coding is catching on all over Arkansas. Our students and educators understand that computer science is a key to a great future for themselves and for our state.
 
Students such as these, who have embraced the opportunity to learn coding, are the reason our state has caught the eye and earned the praise of people such as Hadi and his organization, Code.org.
 
I am confident that there are young people such as Hadi and Ali all over Arkansas who already are developing ideas and products. Our job as leaders and educators is to make sure they have every chance to do just that. This is what this summit is about.
 
5-24-19 3:57 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Arkansas Guard Deployed In Anticipation of Flooding

Governor Hutchinson Directs Deployment of National Guard High-Water-Rescue Teams In Anticipation of Weeklong Flooding
 
LITTLE ROCK –  Governor Asa Hutchinson has directed Arkansas National Guard General Mark Berry to deploy 26 members of the Arkansas Guard in anticipation of flooding that may continue through next week. The two high-water-rescue teams will be stationed in western Arkansas by Saturday morning and will move southeast with the floodwaters.
 
“We are preparing to deal with the record-breaking floodwaters that meteorologists and the Corps of Engineers are predicting for the coming days,” Governor Hutchinson said. “I have directed General Berry to deploy two thirteen-member teams and will direct the deployment of more guardsmen as needed. If your local emergency management officials order an evacuation, please heed their warning.”
 
The Arkansas River is expected to crest at record levels. Meteorologists have compared the potential flooding to water levels in the 1990 floods.
 
“This is an extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation," the National Weather Service said.
Officials have issued a warning that drivers not cross flood-swollen creeks. “Turn around. Don’t drown.”
 
5-24-19 12:09 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Fly Flags At Half Staff Monday, Memorial Day

Fly the United States Flags at Half-Staff  From Sunrise Until Noon on Monday, May 27, 2019 for Memorial Day  

 

Memorial Day, which is observed on the last Monday of May, commemorates the men and women who died while in the military service.  In observance of Memorial Day, fly the United States flag at half staff from sunrise until NOON , and then raise it to full height from noon to sundown. 

 

The flag, when flown at half-staff, should be first hoisted to the peak for an instant and then slowly lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day. On Memorial Day the flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon only, then raised to the top of the staff.  


Click here to see the entire US Flag Code.

 

5-24-19 11:04 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

May 24, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The rate of maternal mortality in Arkansas is above the national average, so earlier this year the legislature created a review committee to develop new strategies for preventing women from dying during childbirth.

 

The state Health Department will set up the committee with members from various medical and public health disciplines.

 

The committee will analyze the details of all pregnancy-related deaths, including the circumstances when women die as long as a year after giving birth. Regardless of the stated cause of death, the committee will review all the relevant factors that may have contributed to the deaths.

 

Committee members will review medical records and contact family members and other people involved in the women’s deaths.

 

The committee will recommend ways to prevent maternal deaths, such as efforts by public health agencies and clinics to improve prenatal care.

 

Under Act 829 of 2019, health care providers, facilities and pharmacies shall provide access to medical records. The act specifies that they will not be liable in a lawsuit for making those medical records available.

 

The medical records that are provided to the committee shall not be admissible as evidence in court, or before a regulatory board. Committee members and Health Department staff who participate in gathering and analyzing medical records shall not disclose them.

 

The proceedings of the committee will be confidential, as will the records it gathers and the statements of people interviewed by the committee.

If the medical information is available from other sources and by other avenues, it can still be used in criminal and civil proceedings.

 

Each year the committee shall issue a report to the Senate and House Committees on Public Health, Welfare and Labor and the Legislative Council. The Maternal Mortality Review Committee’s reports shall be in aggregate form, and will not include details that identify specific physicians or health care facilities.

 

Serious illness related to pregnancy is on the increase, perhaps due to lack of access to prenatal care and perhaps to increases in abuse of tobacco, drugs and alcohol.

 

In Arkansas, each year on average 35 women die during pregnancy or childbirth for every 100,000 live births. The national average is 20 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The main causes are bleeding, blood clots, heart problems and pre-existing chronic conditions. Public health experts estimate that half of the maternal deaths are preventable.

 

School Bus Safety

It’s illegal to pass a school bus that is stopped and has its red lights flashing, while children are getting off or boarding. But according to surveys by school bus drivers, it happens more than 800 times a day in Arkansas.

 

The state Education Department reported that 3,896 bus drivers in 227 Arkansas school districts reported 884 instances of being passed illegally on April 24. In 12 of those violations, vehicles passed the stopped bus on the right side, where children get on and off the bus.

 

More drivers participated this year than last year, when 3,258 drivers in 194 districts reported being passed illegally 857 times.

 

The legislature has approved Acts 166 of 2019 and Act 2128 of 2005 to strengthen penalties for passing a stopped school bus.

 

5-24-19 6:52 a.m. KAWX.ORG

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Sales and Road Improvement Tax Collections Up For April Compared To 2018

Polk County Treasurer Tonya K. Fretz has released the monthly Sales Tax and Road Improvement Tax report for May 2019 reflecting collections for the month of April 2019.

 
Both taxes are 1% on retail sales and each generated $134,485.62 in April 2019, or a total of $268,971.24.
 
To date in 2019 the taxes have generated $1,290,890.80, a $21,861.50 increase over the same period in 2018.
 
5-23-19 10:47 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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ARDOT Warning Memorial Day Weekend Travelers About Construction Projects

LITTLE ROCK (5-22) – The Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT) reminds drivers to “know before you go” and visit IDriveArkansas.com before traveling during this Memorial Day Holiday.

 

Extensive highway improvements continue through the state. With those improvements come work zones. To aid in your holiday travel, ARDOT has been working hard to open as many lanes as possible. Still, travelers will likely face work zones and possible delays due to increased traffic volume.

 

This long holiday weekend, marking the unofficial start of summer vacation season, will see the second-highest travel volume on record since American Automobile Association (AAA) began tracking holiday travel volumes. The AAA predicts that more than 37 million Americans will travel by automobile and more than 50 miles from home between Thursday, May 23 and Monday, May 27.

 

To help motorists find ways around accidents and work zone backups on Interstates, ARDOT has an Alternate Routes feature on IDriveArkansas.com. It displays linkages between the Interstate corridors and secondary routes that motorists may consider when travel is delayed. Additionally information on closures due to weather impacts is available on these maps. You can also follow us on Twitter @myARDOT.

 

5-22-19 5:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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CORPS CAUTIONS LAKE USERS OF HIGH WATER DURING HOLIDAY WEEKEND

Ashdown, Ark. -Dierks Lake is experiencing high water causing 51 campsites to be closed.


As the water recedes, some campsites and camping loops will remain closed to allow for flood damage repairs and to clean up the sites.  


Campgrounds and facilities that will be affected at Dierks Lake are as follows:  Jefferson Ridge Loop 1, Loop 2, and all swim beaches.


We would like to apologize for any inconvenience this causes our visitors.


Water levels are higher than normal at Dierks, De Queen, Gillham, and Millwood lakes so please be aware of floating debris and submerged objects.

 

Wear your life jacket and watch out for others when boating.  You might be doing everything right, but another boater who is not paying attention could put you and those with you in serious danger.


For more information about recreational activities at our parks please visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/littlerockusace, our webpage at https://www.swl.usace.army.mil/ or call the Army Corps of Engineers Millwood Office between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays at 1-870-898-3343. 

 

5-22-19 5:33 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: The Vicious Trend of Vaping

LITTLE ROCK – The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has become a dangerous trend in which too many Arkansas teens are participating. Eight years ago, just two percent of Arkansas teens vaped. Today, more than 20 percent of Arkansas teens vape. Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling a vapor, which is produced by an e-cigarette or similar device. The term “vaping” is used because e-cigarettes do not produce tobacco smoke, but rather an aerosol that actually consists of fine particles containing varying amounts of toxic chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, as well as seizures, respiratory and heart diseases.
 
“As adults, we need to be watchful of the young people around us and educate them about the dangers of vaping,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “Manufacturers make these products to look flashy and appealing to teens. This is an extremely dangerous trend that is hitting Arkansas’s middle and high school students at alarming numbers.”
 
Attorney General Rutledge released the following tips to warn parents, teachers and children of the dangers of vaping e-cigarettes:
 

  • Review the ingredients carefully because many of them contain substances known to be carcinogenic, such as nicotine, vegetable glycerin and propylene glycol.
  • Consult your physician about the risks associated with vaping. One pod used in an e-cigarette can have the same amount of nicotine as an entire pack of traditional cigarettes. Exposure to nicotine can alter the structure and function of developing children’s brains.
  • Remember that studies have shown that nicotine products are highly addictive and are associated with later onset of cigarette smoking habits.
  • Investigate the incidence of product failure as some e-cigarette device batteries have exploded or caught on fire, causing burns or even death.
  • Remember to keep e-cigarette supplies out of the reach of small children as some have become sick or died from swallowing the pleasant-smelling e-juice.
  • Be mindful that e-cigarette pods can be used for illegal purposes such as for odorless marijuana oils based upon online tutorials.

 

There are many different types of e-cigarettes and other vaping devices, most of which contain pods of nicotine-filled e-liquid, sweet-smelling flavorings, and other potentially harmful chemicals. With sweet-smelling aromas and catchy flavor names like Strawberry Watermelon POP, Sunrise Pressed eJuice, Pink Lemonade Risky and Ice Cream, teens are experimenting with, and ultimately becoming addicted, to e-cigarettes. Once they get hooked, teens are often able to hide their addictions from parents, teachers and other adults by purchasing widely available vaping devices disguised as everyday items like pens or USB flash drives.

 

For more information and tips to avoid scams and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982 or consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov or facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge.

 

5-22-19 5:08 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Weekly Fishing Report

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for May 22, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

5-22-19 5:02 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments May 22nd

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Rosie R. Arthur, W/F, age 45, Count I: Failure To Appear, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Kristian Manley, W/F, age 33, Count I: Failure To Appear, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Logan E. Pitts, W/M, age 40, Count I: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Davis Marshall Fraser, W/M, age 30, Count I: Theft By Receiving, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Theft By receiving, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession Of Firearms By Certain Persons, a Class "D" Felony. Count IV: Theft Of Property, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Tatum Veal, W/F, age 28, Count I: Failure To Appear, a Class "C" Felony. Count II: Failure To Appear, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Heidi M. Wilson, W/F, age 42, Count I: Nonsupport, a Class "C" Felony.

 

5-22-19 4:57 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Attorney General's Mobile Office In Mena June 25th

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutlege announed today the the Attorney General's Mobile Office will me in Mena June 25th from 10:00 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at the Polk County Senior Center located at 401 Autumn Drive, which is just off of Race Track Road.

 

Rutledge Announces June Mobile Office Schedule

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge today announced mobile office locations for June.

 

Attorney General Rutledge created this initiative during her first year in office to increase office accessibility for all Arkansans, particularly to those who live outside the capital city. Office hours were held in all 75 counties each year during her first term, assisting 3,300 Arkansans. In 2019, Attorney General Mobile Offices have already served over 1,000 Arkansans.

 

Rutledge believes face-to-face conversations are the best way to truly hear from Arkansans. The Attorney General Mobile Offices assist constituents with consumer related issues by filing consumer complaints against scam artists as well as answering questions about the office and the other services it offers to constituents.

 

Rutledge continues her partnerships with the Cooperative Extension Service and local law enforcement across Arkansas. Law enforcement officials will be on hand to collect unused and expired prescription medications to ensure they are secured and properly disposed. Arkansans are encouraged to bring their old, unused or expired prescription medications to an upcoming mobile office. During Rutledge’s first term, over 618 pounds of medications were collected at mobile offices. Another 135 pounds of medications have been collected so far this year.

 

For more information about services provided by the Attorney General’s office, visit ArkansasAG.gov or call (501) 682-2007. Rutledge can also be found on Facebook at facebook.com/AGLeslieRutledge and on Twitter at twitter.com/AGRutledge.

 

The upcoming mobile office schedule is below:

 

Cleburne County

Tuesday, June 4

noon to 1:30 p.m.

Fairfield Bay Senior Center

385 Dave Creek Parkway

Fairfield Bay, AR 72088

 

Miller County

Thursday, June 6

10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

Miller County Senior Adult Center

1007 Jefferson Ave.

Texarkana, AR 71854

 

Fulton County

Tuesday, June 11

10:30 a.m. to noon

Salem Senior Life Center

309 W. Church St.

Salem, AR 72576

 

Hot Spring County

Friday, June 14

9:30 to 11:00 a.m.

Malvern Senior Activity Center

1800 W. Moline St.

Malvern, AR 72104

 

Ouachita County

Tuesday, June 18

10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

Camden Senior Center

465 Columbia Ave. SW

Camden, AR 71701

 

St. Francis County

Thursday, June 20

10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

St. Bernards Senior Life Center – Forrest City

2550 S. Washington St.

Forrest City, AR 72335

 

Polk County

Tuesday, June 25

10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

Mena-Polk County Senior Center

401 Autumn Drive

Mena, AR 71953

 

5-20-19 10:43 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For May 13th-19th

 

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of May 13 - May 19, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


May 13, 2019
Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 76 East near Mena led to the arrest of Katelyn E. Enyeart, 26, of Mena, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.  Also arrested was Logan E. Pitts, 40, of Mena, on Charges of Disorderly Conduct and Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance.
Report from Polk County Detention Center of the discovery of contraband on an inmate in the facility.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Lauren A. Spurkosky, 34, of Mena, on a Warrant for Tampering.
Arrested was Debbie A. Pruitt, 34, of Mena, on Charges of Theft of Property and Criminal Mischief 1st Degree and a Warrant for Commercial Burglary.
Arrested was Jeff A. White, 38, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order and a Montgomery County Warrant.
Arrested by a Drug Task Force Officer was Dennis W. Howard, 45, of Cove, on a Warrant for Felony Failure to Appear.


May 14, 2019
Report of disruptive behavior led to a 17-year-old male being issued Juvenile Citations for Disorderly Conduct and Resisting Arrest.  The juvenile was released to the custody of a parent/guardian.
Traffic stop on Highway 71 South near Cove led to the arrest of Krishna K. Turner, 27, of Vandervoort, on Charges of Fleeing, Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance, No Driver’s License, No Vehicle Insurance and No Vehicle License.
Report from walk-in complainant of the mistreatment of animals.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Michael W. McCormick, 55, of Grannis, on a Warrant for Rape.
Report from complainant on Polk 189 near Mena of unauthorized persons on their property.  Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 15, 2019
Report from complainant on River Lane near Ink of being the victim of theft by deception, totaling losses at $2,500.00.  Investigation continues.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was James C. Lane, 40, of Mena, on a Body Attachment Warrant.


May 16, 2019
Report of a disturbance on Fender Lane near Ink.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 418 near Potter led to a 17-year-old male being issued Juvenile Citations for Disorderly Conduct and Criminal Mischief.  The juvenile was released to the custody of a parent/guardian.

May 17, 2019
Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 24 near Cove.  Deputies responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 122 near Shady Grove.  Deputies responded.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Tilley Road near Hatfield of the theft of a firearm, valued at $350.00.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Cove of the fraudulent use of a credit card, totaling losses at $10,000.00.  Investigation continues.


May 18, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 416 near Potter of being the victim of an attempted scam.  Complainant was advised to cease all contact with suspect.
Report from complainant on Polk 646 near Mena of the theft of lumber, valued at $52.00.  Investigation continues.
Report from a Mena woman of the discovery of a firearm.
Arrested was Jacquelin L. Burnett, 28, of Mena, on a Drug Court Sanction.
Arrested was Rosie R. Arthur, 45, of Oden, on a Warrant for Felony Failure to Appear.


May 19, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 710 near Potter of unauthorized vehicles on their property led to the arrest of Logan E. Pitts, 40, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License.
Report from complainant on Polk 710 near Potter of the discovery of illegal substances.  Deputy responded.
Report from a church on Polk 70 in Cherry Hill of the theft of electronics, all valued at $120.00.  Investigation continues.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 661 near Cherry Hill.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Kristian D. Taylor, 31, of Hatfield, on a Warrant for Felony Failure to Appear.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked two vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 24 Incarcerated Inmates , with 9 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00371

 

5-20-19 10:25 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Department Report for May 12th-18th

 

Mena Police Department Reports for the Week of May 12, 2019 through May 18, 2019 

 

May 12, 2019

 

Report was made of someone vandalizing a gate on a local property.  No suspects at this time.

 

Shawn Daniel Morrison, 34, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police Department.  He was picked up in Texarkana, and local officers travelled there to return him to Polk County.

 

May 13, 2019

 

Jennifer Widders, 27, of Mena was charged with shoplifting after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.

 

Dax Wood, 22, of Mena was charged with shoplifting after a call to a local retail store.  He was additionally served an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police Department.

 

Jeremiah Brown, 38, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from a local agency.

 

Thomas Russell Lindley, 47, of Fort Smith was charged with possession of a schedule VI controlled substance and disorderly conduct after a call to a local business.

 

Officers travelled to Glenwood and brought Debbie Arline Pruett, 34, of Mena back to Polk County where she was served an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police Department.

 

May 14, 2019

 

Jessica D. Caldwell, 37, of Mena was charged with possession of an instrument of crime following a traffic stop.

 

Stephanie Abbot, 38, of Mena was charged with second degree battery.  The arrest followed a call and subsequent investigation at a local residence.

 

Mamie Renee Stinson, 41, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant for contempt of court from the Waldron Police Department.

 

May 15, 2019

 

John Charles Murphy, 32, of Mena was charged with driving on a suspended driver’s license.

 

Vickie Ramirez, 42, of Mena was charged with possession of cocaine or methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, having no driver’s license, and filing to signal.  Arrest followed a traffic stop.

 

May 16, 2019

 

A local woman reported the theft of her vehicle which was later located in Fort Smith  Report was forwarded to the prosecuting attorney’s office for an arrest warrant for the suspect.

 

May 17, 2019

 

A Polk County woman reported that her 16-year-old daughter had not come home.  She was located and the mother came to the communications center to get her.  Case has been referred to juvenile authorities.

 

Jack Rawlins, 52, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police Department.

 

May 18, 2019

 

Dusty T. Dollar, 53, of Oden was charged with DWI after a call from a concerned citizen.

 

James Miller, 42, of Mena was charged with shoplifting after a call to a local retail store.

 

5-20-19 1:12 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

In Arkansas, 41% of the population live in rural counties. In contrast, only 14% of the United States population as a whole live in nonmetropolitan counties. Our state is a very rural one, so when we work to expand our economy we must always recognize the challenges that our rural communities face.

 

That is why many of us and many of your city and county leaders gathered at the Arkansas Rural Development Conference this week.

This conference is organized by the Arkansas Economic Development Commission and is designed for anyone interested in improving the quality of life in Arkansas’ rural communities.

 

The objective of the annual event is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a working knowledge about a variety of programs and services that are available to assist communities and their leaders with development, planning and revitalization efforts.

 

The House and Senate Committees for Agriculture, Forestry, and Economic Development convened at the conference this week to hear updates on the Big River Steel plant in Osceola and CZ-USA, a firearms manufacturer which recently chose Little Rock as its headquarters.

 

The House and Senate Committees on City, County, and Local Affairs also convened at the conference. Those committees were given a review of the programs and grants offered by the AEDC Division of Rural Services.

 

At the conference, Gov. Asa Hutchinson presented grants totaling $586,633.14 to 49 cities and counties throughout Arkansas.  Rural Services grants fall into one of three programs: the Rural Community Grant Program, the County Fair Building Grant Program, and the Arkansas Unpaved Roads Grant Program. All require a 50 percent matching grant to be eligible for the programs.

 

The conference also presented information from several women and minority business owners who have benefitted from the Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprise Division. This division promotes the growth of minority and women-owned businesses by providing them with real-world technical and professional assistance, certification, networking, capital and contracting opportunities while utilizing AEDC partners in state and federal government, higher education, lending institutions, and the private sector.

 

Only about 25 percent of small businesses in the state are owned by women, while the number of minority-owned businesses is even lower at around 14.7 percent.

 

Workforce development is another focus of the conference. AEDC has the ability to assist new and existing industry with the growth of their workforce through training programs. One such program is the Arkansas Career Readiness Certificate (CRC). The CRD is a portable credential that confirms to employers that an individual possesses basic workplace skills in reading for information, applied mathematics, and locating information. To date, the Arkansas Career Readiness Certificate program has qualified more than 59,000 high-skilled positions.

 

Rural communities are important to all of us as they are a primary source for food, energy, clean drinking water and accessible outdoor recreation.  You can find out more on how we invest in these communities by visiting www.arkansasedc.com.

 

5-18-19 10:51 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Pioneer Day May 18th at QWSP Near Mena, Other Weekend Activities Scheduled

Saturday, May 18th is Pioneer Day at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena starting at 10:00 am for 5 hours at the Wonder House. There will be Dutch Oven Cooking, Making Butter, Making Candles, Making Soap, Pioneer Games, Mammal Skins Wood Crafts, And Much More! Ever wonder how people used to cook, or what games and toys children played in early Arkansas? How about what tools were used for everyday living and how they are similar to those we still use today? Join us at the Wonder House for some family fun! Special Note-Call the park at (479) 394-2863 to make sure the weather doesn't cancel Pioneer Day. For the local forecast, visit KAWX.ORG or dial (479) 394-5600.

 

Sunday, May 19th Reservoir Hike starting at 10:00 am lasting 1 hour 15 minutes at the Reservoir Trailhead. Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a hike to what used to be the old water system for the 1898 hotel.

 

Sunday, May 19th Wonder House Tour at 2:00 pm lasting 30 minutes at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

 

Sunday, May 19th Touch Table at 3:30 pm lasting 1 hour in the Hearth Room. There will be different things that you can see and touch. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun, interactive way of exploring things found in our park, and find out what they are.

 

5-17-19 3:22 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: The Plan for Broadband

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: The Plan for Broadband
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – This week, I released the details of the Arkansas State Broadband Plan. This is the plan that will expand high-speed broadband internet to the rural areas of Arkansas.
 
The time for expanding broadband all over the state is now. As recently as 30 years ago, the idea of internet was as foreign to most people as the concept of electricity was to people 200 years ago.
 
But we have seen the technology grow to the point that it is almost as essential to our daily life as electricity.
 
Power companies and government have accepted the social obligation to see that electricity is broadly available. Likewise, broadband has become so essential to modern life that we can’t ignore people who don’t have it. Students need access to do their schoolwork at home. For many, broadband is essential for access to health care information and services. We buy merchandise and pay our taxes over the internet.
 
To ensure that no one is left behind simply because they choose to live in a rural area, we have developed this plan.
 
The goal of the plan is to provide high-speed broadband to every area of the state with a population of at least 500 people by 2022. This is ambitious but doable.
 
The standard is 25/3, which means we will provide internet at the speed of 25 megabits per second for downloading data and 3 megabits per second for uploading. You might ask, “What does this mean in real life?” The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette explained it best. This means you can download a song in one second, and you can download a two-hour movie in about 10 minutes.
 
On the day we released the plan, I received an email from a man who lives in a wooded rural area in the southeast corner of the state. The closest town is nine miles away.
 
He said that the high-speed internet he uses is expensive, but even the fast internet he pays for is slow.
 
He said his internet service is so slow that he couldn’t download the news story so he could read about this plan. He expressed the frustration that many in rural areas feel. This plan will resolve many of these issues.
 
I am grateful to Dr. Nathan Smith of the Arkansas Development Finance Authority, who oversaw the work to produce this plan, and to all the private-sector partners who assisted him. This is one more way that we are making Arkansas an even better place to live and work.
 
To read the entire plan, go to my website at governor.arkansas.gov.
 
5-17-19 2:36 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Gratitude for Our Service Members

 

While it may seem like the members of the U.S. Senate—much like America itself—are strongly divided on issues of national policy, I can say without a doubt that we are all united in support of our troops and their efforts to protect and defend our nation and its ideals.

 

The men and women who wear our nation’s uniform selflessly serve. They are fully aware of the risks they face. Despite that, they bravely put themselves in harm’s way to defend our country, ideals and allies around the world.

 

They didn’t choose this life to seek recognition, awards or honors. Like those who wore the uniform before them, they chose the path of a higher calling, desiring to use their talents for the greater good. The men and women who serve in our military embody what it means to be a giver.

 

I know my fellow Arkansans share my gratitude and appreciation for all of our military personnel and their families who sacrifice at home while their loved ones are abroad.

 

Our state has a storied military heritage and a long, proud history of supporting our nation’s defense. Troops stationed in the state served our country honorably even before it was admitted to the Union.

 

Today, Arkansans stationed around the globe and our personnel at the Little Rock Air Force Base, Camp Robinson, Ebbing Air National Guard Base, Pine Bluff Arsenal and Fort Chaffee continue to make the Natural State proud.

 

We highlight their service during the month of May—which includes six military-related national observance days—as a way to express our gratitude. That gratitude endures in perpetuity.

 

We simply cannot thank our service members enough for the tremendous sacrifices they make to ensure that we can continue to live in the greatest, free country the world has ever known.

 

As the son of an Air Force Master Sergeant, I learned at a young age about the sacrifices our men and women in uniform make. I also learned very early on, that military families face unique challenges. It truly is a family affair.

 

My father joined the National Guard while he was in high school and, in the middle of his junior year, his unit was shipped out to prepare for World War II. He remained in the Air Force long after the war was over, serving over twenty years.

 

The example set by my father’s military career—and the lessons we learned growing up in a military family—helped my siblings and me prepare for a productive, service-centered life. The experience taught us one of the most valuable lessons I continue to carry with me today—through their service to our country, the men and women of our military are part of something much bigger than themselves.

 

My father was not only my hero, but as a World War II veteran, he and his fellow service members in my hometown of Fort Smith were embraced in the same manner by the community as a whole. The respect and admiration our community displayed for military members wasn’t faked or forced. It was genuine. And it remains just as strong today in communities across our great nation.

 

While those displays will be more publicly visible during National Military Appreciation Month, the feelings of respect, admiration and gratitude will carry on long after the end of this month. Our nation is eternally grateful for the sacrifice of every service member working to keep America safe, strong and free.

 

5-17-19 1:59 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

May 17, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The goal of the new Arkansas State Broadband Plan, announced by the governor, is to make high-speed Internet access available to all communities of more than 500 people by the year 2022.

 

The announcement specifically cites three Senate bills that have become law and have streamlined the process of setting up communications technology in under-served areas.

 

The Arkansas plan uses the standard for high speed Internet as 25 Mbps/3 Mbps. That means your Internet connection is capable of downloading 25 megabits per second and uploading three megabits per second.

 

The plan will benefit many residents of urban areas, as well as those in rural areas. In many Arkansas towns there are neighborhoods lacking access to high speed broadband. But other neighborhoods do have high speed access, so a map can be deceptive because it would indicate that the entire town has a capability of 25 mbps/3mbps.

 

According to the announcement, about 251,000 people in Arkansas live in areas with no Internet access. About 641,000 Arkansas residents have Internet access, but not high speed Internet.

 

About 721,000 have access to only one Internet provider, so they cannot switch to another company if they are unsatisfied with their quality of service. Now, there are 136 companies providing Internet service in Arkansas.

 

During this year’s regular session, the legislature approved two new acts to promote expansion of broadband in areas that are lacking. Act 198 of 2019 allows local governments to get involved in the creation of new Internet service. In partnership with private companies, local entities can apply for federal funding, loans and grants.

 

Act 999 of 2019 promotes the growth of wireless and communications technology through new products such as 5G technology. Its goal is the building of new small cells and the antennas needed to make them work. Act 999 allows government entities to make agreements with private companies to use public rights-of-way for those facilities.

 

Also mentioned in the announcement was Act 813 of 2017, which allows for the creation of public-private partnerships. The partnerships are not limited to computer and communications projects. They can be for new facilities at schools, prisons, recreation centers, utilities, water and sewer systems, hospitals and libraries.

 

Expanding broadband access throughout Arkansas is important for many reasons. It will improve health care, by making transmittal of medical records faster and by allowing more video-conferencing. It will improve all aspects of education. It will promote economic development, and make opportunity more nearly equal in all geographic areas of the state.

 

It will prepare us for the next era, when broadband technology will allow transmission of even greater amounts of data than is possible now.

 

Except for the most visionary among us, the current standard of 25 mbps would have seemed unthinkable in the 1990s, when it was necessary in many households to unplug the telephone to access the Internet. The telephone would have been a “landline” and many consumers referred to the Internet as the “World Wide Web.”

 

The new Broadband Plan recognizes that Internet service in America has become like electricity and running water, in that now it is so essential that government assumes the responsibility of helping to make it available where the private sector cannot afford to.

 

5-17-19 12:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Lottery Ticket Sales In April Over $42 Million, $169K In Polk County

Lottery ticket sales in Arkansas for the so called Scholarship Lottery were $42,773,997.00 for the month of April 2019.

 
The highest sales were in Pulaski County at $7,906,466.50. The lowest sales were in Montgomery County at $35,134.00.
 
Polk County sales were $169,314.50.
 
According to the Arkansas Family council, only about about sixteen cents of each dollar the lottery takes in goes for scholarships.
 
5-16-19 2:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments May 10th, 13th, 15th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. John Leonard Mitchell, W/M, age 59, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule VI Controlled Substance With The Purpose To Deliver, Marijuana, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. David Marshall Fraser, W/M, age 30, Count I: Fleeing, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Sheri Benson, W/F, age 52, Count I: Battery In The Second Degree, a Class "D" Felony. 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Dennis Howard, W/M, age 45, Count I: Failure To Appear, a Class "C" Felony. Count II: Failure To Appear, a Class "C" Felony. Count III" Failure To Appear, a Class "C" Felony.


State of Arkansas Vs. Debbie A. Pruitt, W/F, age 34, Count I: Commercial Burglary, a Class "C" Felony. Count II" Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count III: Criminal Mischief In The First Degree, a Class "A" Misdemeanor.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Vickie Ramirez, W/F, age 42, Count I: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, Methamphetamine, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Stephanie Abbott, W/F, age 38, Count I: Domestic Battery In The Second Degree, a Class "D" Felony.

 

5-16-19 12:17 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Arkansas Squirrel Hunting 101, Season Is Open

 Although most people associate hunting squirrels in early fall when hickory nuts and acorns begin to ripen, Arkansas’s squirrel season officially opens May 15 each year. The season will remain open until the end of February, making it Arkansas's longest hunting season. (Fishing never closes in The Natural State.)

Although the vast majority of squirrel hunters still wait for chillier weather to chase bushytails, a small, but dedicated group also enjoy spring outings before the weather becomes too hot to truly enjoy a day in the field. In fact, with this year’s cool spring conditions, hunting squirrels in spring will be more comfortable than most days in September, when the temperature can reach the 90-degree mark on a fairly regular basis.  

Soft mast like red mullberries are top food sources for squirrles in spring. Photo by David Stephens 

 

Fresh fruit
With fall squirrel hunting, success means finding what foods the squirrels are eating, and spring is no different. The secret to squirrel pot pie is in finding what they’re putting in their bellies. Food options, however, are drastically different once the fall’s menu of acorns and hard mast has been consumed.

 

By May, squirrels have likely consumed all of the nuts and other snacks in their cache, and anything they left behind on the ground has rotted or tried to sprout. Even some of the nuts they inadvertently “planted” will begin to sprout if conditions are right. Many wild fruits, such as blueberries and blackberries still have a month or so to go before they ripen.  Until then, most squirrels are living off whatever food sources they can find. The fresh buds of oak, pecan and maple trees all interest them, and flowers from hickories, elms and even pines will help draw a few squirrels. While food sources may be scattered now, it’s a good time to get a plant or tree identification guide and learn where you can find dogwoods, wild blackberry thickets, wild blueberries known as huckleberries, and especially mulberry trees. As these soft-mast foods ripen, there won’t be a squirrel within a few miles that won’t be tempted to come down for a bite.

 

Red mulberry trees can be distinguished by their heart-shaped, serrated leaves and smooth, grayish brown bark. Photo by Chris Evans 

 

Round and round the mulberry tree
The mulberry, no doubt, is the king of late spring squirrel fare. This native tree produces small raspberry-like fruits that squirrels simply cannot resist. If you are able to find a ripening mulberry tree, look no further for your squirrel hunt. Sit down within range of the tree and let the woods settle down. Squirrels will soon be on their way. Determining if the fruits are ripe is easy with mulberry trees as well, just taste them. Many people collect mulberries for pies, jellies and jams, and they make a good treat at the end of a hunt as well. We don’t advise trying this technique unless you’re sure of what type of tree the berry came from. Some squirrel foods can be inedible to humans, and others like dogwood fruits may not be toxic but are so bitter and astringent, you’ll wish you hadn’t tried it.

Squirrles will resume activities quickly after the woods settle during a still hunt. Photo by Mike Wintroath, AGFC

 

Still hunt with a purpose
If you don’t have a food source picked out, don’t panic. Squirrels aren’t too much of a challenge to figure out any time of year. Just like during fall and winter, they’re going to be most active first thing in the morning. Morning hunts also make walking in the woods a little more comfortable, as the humidity of late spring and early summer can turn heavily forested areas into a sauna by midday. 

 

In spring, looking for woods that are a little different than fall. The tall, acorn-filled oak stands won’t be as tempting to squirrels as the edges of that woodline where more green growth and smaller, soft-mast-producing species thrive. Bushytails still will seek the shelter of the trees, but they’re much more likely to be bouncing around and shaking younger branches, which will give away their position. Their red and gray coats also will stand out much more against the bright green, making them easier to spot than during winter hunts. 

 

Slowly walk a safe distance into your selected area, then pause for a few minutes to scan every tree for movement. Squirrels have as much attention span as a teenager with an iPhone, so it won’t take long after you settle down before they forget you’re there and continue with their business. If you don’t see any movement after about 10 minutes, take a few slow steps to gain a new vantage point and repeat the process. While scanning the woods, keep an eye out for possible food sources you can mark for your next hunt. If you find one, give it additional time before moving on in your still hunt as it may be all you need to stay rich in squirrels for the season. 

A 12-gauge shotgun and a handfull of shells is all it takes to enjoy a spring squirrel hunt. Photo by Mike Wintrioath, AGFC

 

Scattergun season
Spring squirrel hunting is made for the shotgun. Instead of walking over crunchy, newly fallen leaves, you’ll be walking over spring growth, which is much quieter. The leaves on the trees make it much easier to stalk closely for a shot. They also make it a little harder to get a clean shot from long distances where a .22-caliber rimfire would excel. The shotgun’s limited distance also offers an added bit of safety when the leaves obscure your target’s background in the distance. A 12-gauge or 20-gauge shotgun with a pocketful of shells loaded with no. 6 shot is all it takes to harvest fox squirrels and gray squirrels in spring. Be sure to bring your empty shell hulls back home with you and dispose of them properly with the rest of your trash from the day.

 

Enjoy the harvest
Take extra care when preparing any meals with the squirrel to remove as much shot as possible from the meat. The AGFC has an easy-to-follow video on how to properly clean and dress a squirrel after the hunt. For this video and more squirrel hunting resources, visit www.agfc.com/en/hunting/small-game/squirrel.

 

5-15-19 6:00 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 

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Weekly Fishing Report

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for May 15, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

5-15-19 4:35 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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ARKANSAS STATE POLICE TO MOTORISTS: "CLICK IT OR TICKET"

(LITTLE ROCK) – As Arkansas families begin to make plans for summertime road trips and vacations, law enforcement officers are urging motorists to obey the law and buckle their seat belts.  Beginning next week additional patrol assignments have been scheduled for law enforcement officers across Arkansas who are devoting time to strictly enforce Arkansas’ primary seat belt law.
 
  The enforcement plan includes the Arkansas State Police and local departments represented by the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police and the Arkansas Sheriff’s Association.  The special operation begins May 20th and continues through June 2nd as part of the “Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement campaign.
 
  “As part of a national effort, officers will be out in force across the state to remind motorists that seat belt use is not optional,” said Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police and the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative.  “It is a mandatory, life-saving measure that must be taken seriously, every day and every night, without exception,” Colonel Bryant continued. “It is our hope that the enhanced police presence, as well as heightened public awareness with paid advertising, will hammer this message home and protect our motorists as they begin their summer travel for the Memorial Day holiday.”
 
  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) there were 10,076 unbuckled passenger vehicle occupants killed during 2017 in U.S. motor vehicle crashes.  In that same year, 55 percent of passenger vehicle occupants killed at night (6 p.m.–5:59 a.m.) were not wearing their seat belts. Participating law enforcement agencies will not accept any excuses when they stop a violator.
  “There’s an old saying, “there’s strength in numbers,” and our mobilization efforts have yielded impressive results in years past, said Chief Chad Henson, of the Trumann Police Department and President of the Arkansas Association of Chiefs of Police. “I’m confident Arkansas law enforcement officers will do the same in the coming days.”
 
  “The Click It or Ticket campaign is important because it raises awareness about seat belt use during the time when seat belts are least used – at night,” said Susan DeCourcy, NHTSA Region 7 Administrator.  “An increased number of law enforcement officers throughout Arkansas and the nation will actively be participating in the mobilization to ensure all motor vehicle occupants are buckled up day and night to reduce the risk of injury and death caused in traffic crashes.”
 
  Arkansas state law requires all front seat passengers, not just drivers, to buckle-up.  All children, less than fifteen years of age must be properly secured in the vehicle.  A child who is less than six years of age and who weighs less than sixty pounds shall be restrained in a child passenger safety seat. If the driver has a restricted license, all passengers in the vehicle must be properly buckled up.
 
  “As we gear up for the mobilization, I want Arkansas drivers to know that they can’t hide from the state’s seat belt laws simply because they don’t travel on the major highways, said Sheriff Ron Brown of Crawford County and President of the Arkansas Sheriff’s Association. “The law is the law, whether there is one car on the road or five hundred in bumper-to-bumper traffic.  And more importantly perhaps, a car crash can happen anywhere at any time. That’s why it is critically important to buckle up before you drive, no matter where you are going or the route you take to get there.”
 
   For more information about "Click it or Ticket" and how seat belts save lives, click on www.nhtsa.gov/ciot or contact the Arkansas Highway Safety Office at (501) 618-8133.  Information about Arkansas' ongoing "Toward Zero Deaths" campaign can be found at www.TZDarkansas.org.
 
5-15-19 10:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson Releases Arkansas State Broadband Plan

Governor Hutchinson Releases Arkansas State Broadband Plan, Goal for Rural Connectivity in Four Years
25 Mbps/3 Mbps broadband to all population centers over 500 by 2022
 
LITTLE ROCK – Governor Asa Hutchinson today released the Arkansas State Broadband Plan, which sets a goal to deploy high-speed broadband to all Arkansas communities with more than 500 residents by 2022. The high-speed broadband would have a rate of 25 megabits per second for download and 3 megabits per second for upload. 
 
This plan details the Governor’s goal, how close Arkansas is to achieving that goal, and outlines the means by which that goal can be achieved. You can view the plan in its entirety HERE.
 
Governor Hutchinson issued the following statement:
 
“Arkansas has already established itself as a national leader in providing high-speed, broadband connectivity to our schools. Today, as a result, our students are developing 21st century skills in the classroom to succeed in tomorrow’s workforce. Our focus now extends beyond our schools and into our rural communities. Equal access to high-speed broadband in rural Arkansas is a critical component to the success and longevity of our state’s economy, and I believe this plan will help us accomplish that goal within the next four years.”
 
In March 2019, Governor Hutchinson charged the Arkansas Development Finance Authority Economic Policy Division, led by Nathan Smith, Ph.D., to develop a State Broadband Plan. Stakeholders from the private and public sectors assisted in preparing the plan and provided key feedback during the process. Stakeholders include: 
 
Arkansas Department of Information Systems; the University of Arkansas Agricultural Extension Service; the Arkansas Department of Health; AT&T; Cox; CenturyLink; Windstream; the University of Arkansas System and the ARE-ON Network; Larry Frazier of Rural Arkansas Telecommunication Systems; Arkansas Electric Cooperatives; the Rural Electric Cooperative Association; technology expert Brent Skorup of the Mercatus Center; Elizabeth Bowles of Aristotle and the FCC’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee; Ted Thomas, Chairman of the Arkansas Public Service Commission; the Arkansas Department of Transportation; and Cynthia Edwards, Deputy Secretary of the Arkansas Department of Agriculture.
 
The 77-page plan includes thirteen sections:
 
Section I: Provides additional details about the Governor’s goal, how the state can meet this goal, and the current state of broadband in Arkansas.
Section II: Describes the competitive landscape for broadband services in the state.
Section III: Describes federal government programs that have been instrumental in deploying broadband to rural Arkansas in recent years.
Section IV: Lays out plans for a State Broadband Office, which Governor Hutchinson plans to create, to be tasked with helping Arkansas citizens, companies, and municipalities utilize federal programs. The Broadband office will also oversee public policy deliberations to ensure that all stakeholders are treated fairly while incentivizing deployment.
Section V: Discusses the Arkansas High Cost Fund, which handles large quantities of funds and is highly valued by rural telecom companies, which in turn play an important role in supplying broadband to many parts of rural Arkansas. 
Section VI: Describes existing state and federal communications assets, such as the Arkansas Research and Education Optical Network (ARE-ON), E-Link, which uses the ARE-ON network for telehealth, fiber accessible by the Arkansas Department of Transportation (ArDOT), the Arkansas Wireless Information Network (AWIN), and FirstNet. The state network has an all-fiber presence in all 75 counties, which is a significant asset for Arkansas.
Section VII: Covers the use of broadband in education and the ways that education can promote broadband.
Section VIII and IX: Focuses on two specific industries, agriculture and health care, where the role that rural broadband can play is especially salient for public policy.
Section X: Addresses the important issue of broadband mapping.
Section XI: Deals with a key policy issue in broadband deployment: access to utility poles, towers and other key connection points for wired and wireless communication equipment.
Section XII: Explores policy options suggested by the Federal Communications Commission’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC) that could accelerate broadband deployment through changes in the codes governing infrastructure projects and construction of new buildings.
Section XIII: Explains Act 813 of 2017, which permits public-private partnerships for purposes of infrastructure investments; and Act 198 of 2019, which allows municipalities to apply for funding from grant and loan programs to create broadband service and offer it to the public; and to give governmental entities in Arkansas new options for responding to citizen demands for broadband.
 
With the Governor’s release of a state broadband plan, telecommunications companies, rural electric cooperatives, utilities and internet service providers will be able to cite the plan when applying for federal grants to expand broadband infrastructure and connectivity in rural Arkansas.
 
5-15-19 9:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Fly Flags at Half Staff May 15th for Peace Officers Memorial Day

Flags should be flown at half staff all day Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in recognition of Peace Officers Memorial Day.

 
May 12th - 18th is National Police Week.
Prayer for Our Law Enforcement Officers 
 
Oh Almighty God, whose great power and eternal wisdom
embraces the universe.

Watch over all policemen and law enforcement officers.

Father in Heaven please give them the strength,
courage and perseverance to endure
The unjust condemnation, danger, and physical abuse
to which they are at times subjected.

We recommend them to your loving care because their duty is dangerous.

Dear God, grant these brave men your almighty protection,
Unite them safely with their families after duty has ended.~Amen 
 
5-14-19 8:33 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log For May 6th - 12th

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of May 6 - May 12, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


May 6, 2019


Report of a structure fire on Roach Avenue in Mena.  Deputies responded.
Report from complainant on Polk 288 near Cove of damage done to a mailbox.  Investigation continues.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 189 near Mena.  Deputies responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Traffic stop on Polk 23 near Cove led to the arrest of Robert S. Wallace, 19, of Cove, on a Charge of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Hatfield of damage done to a vehicle by a trailer.  Deputy responded.
Report from complainant on Polk 32 near Cove of the theft of prescription medication, valued at $10.00.
Report from complainant on Highway 246 West near Hatfield of the theft of money and a generator.  The generator was later located.


May 7, 2019


Report from Polk County Detention Center of illegal contraband being brought into the facility.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from Howard County Sheriff’s Office of stolen property from their jurisdiction being located in Polk County.  Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Polk 22 near Cove of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 8, 2019


Report from complainant on Rex Lane near Potter of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Investigation continues.
A Citation for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia was issued to Robert S. Williams, 51, of Mena.
Report of a disturbance on Polk 22 near Cove.  Deputies responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 9, 2019


Traffic stop on 3rd Street in Hatfield led to the arrest of David M. Fraser, 30, of Mena, on Charges of Fleeing in a Vehicle, No Driver’s License, Careless/Prohibited Driving and Breaking or Entering, and Warrants for Probation Violation and three counts of Failure to Appear.  Also arrested were Kaylie M. Stroud, 23, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of a Controlled Substance and Possession of an Instrument of Crime, and Valisha Fraser, 50, of Cove, on a Hold for another agency.


May 10, 2019


Report from a Mena man of problems regarding child custody.
Report from a Mena woman regarding issues with child custody exchange.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was James C. Lane, 40, of Mena, on a Body Attachment Warrant.


May 11, 2019


Traffic stop on Highway 71 South in Hatfield.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


May 12, 2019


Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Rocky of problems with stray dogs.  Deputy responded.
Arrested was Chadwick J. Terrell, 32, of Grannis, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked four vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 25 Incarcerated Inmates, with 6 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00344

 

5-13-19 1:51 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Department Report for May 5th - 11th

Mena Police Department Reports for the Week of May 5, 2019 through May 11, 2019 

 

May 5, 2019

 

Vickie Ramirez, 42, of Mena was charged with possession of a schedule II controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia.  The arrest followed a routine traffic stop.

 

Lonnie Gene Tyler, 50, of Mena was charged with driving on a suspended driver’s license.

 

May 6, 2019

 

Darren Turner, 54,  and Andrew Atkins, 55, both of Mena, were cited for disorderly conduct after officers responded to a call at a local residence.

 

May 7,2019

 

Report was made of a local man breaking a window out of a vehicle.  Case is pending further investigation and location and interview of suspect.

 

May 8, 2019

 

A local man reported the theft of a coin collection from his residence.  Case is pending investigation.

 

A Mena woman reported that she is being harassed by an acquaintance.  No charges have been filed at this time.

 

Jonathan Blaine Higgins, 23 was served an outstanding warrant from Polk County.

 

May 9 & 10, 2019

 

Robert Glen Wells, 31, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant for possession of drug paraphernalia, as well as reckless driving and fleeing in a vehicle.

 

David Frasier, 30, of Cove, was served several warrants from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.

 

May 11, 2019

 

Sherri Benson, 52, of Mena was charged with third degree battery. The file was forwarded to the prosecuting attorney’s office, and further charges may be forthcoming.

 

5-13-19 1:46 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: ADEQ Rewards for Environmental Efforts

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Addres: ADEQ Rewards for Environmental Efforts
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – This week, I’d like to highlight the work of some companies that are finding innovative ways to conduct their business and to protect the environment at the same time.
 
This is timely because this week the Department of Environmental Quality handed out its annual environmental awards to companies and individuals who are using innovation, technology, and sustainable business practices to conserve our natural resources.
 
The winner of the 2019 E2 Award is Entergy Arkansas for its Energy Solutions program, which works to install smart thermostats in homes. The Wi-Fi-connected thermostats cut energy costs and reduce demand on the electric grid at peak hours. Entergy customers have saved a total of over 3.3 million kilowatt hours of electricity — that’s equal to over 2,300 metric tons of carbon dioxide — and over $170,000.
 
The winner of the TECHe Award is the Husqvarna Group, which is the world’s largest producer of outdoor power products. At its Plastic Injection Molding operation in Nashville, Arkansas, Husqvarna launched a program to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by one-third before the end of 2035. To reach that goal, Husqvarna installed a 1.4-megawatt solar-panel array, which generates approximately 30 percent of the facility’s annual electricity need. That saved the company $138,000 over the past 12-months and reduces carbon dioxide emissions by 33,000 metric tons per year.
 
The winner of the 2019 ENVY Award is Clearwater Paper, the nation’s largest provider of private label tissue and a world-class manufacturer of high-quality bleached paperboard. Over a six-year period, the plant in Cypress Bend has saved $5.6 million per year through sustainability projects. The company cut its solid waste by 67,000 tons per year, water use by 25 percent, natural gas use by 22 percent, and electricity use by 8 percent.
 
The youngest winner is Anusha Bhattacharyya, who is graduating from Little Rock Central High this month and in the fall will be enrolling at the University of Arkansas on a full scholarship. She won the Department of Environmental Quality Science Award, which showcases the work of students.
 
She became interested in water-quality issues about a year ago, which led her to design a low-cost hot-water system for cleaning oil from water.
 
This is from the abstract she wrote to describe her technology. “I used a new method to nanostructure Zinc Powder called Hot Water Treatment.”
 
Anusha is working with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to patent her technology. The Department of Environmental Quality isn’t the only organization to recognize her achievement. The Junior Science and Humanities Symposia is a national organization that sponsors competition to promote original research and experimentation in the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) at the high school level. Anusha’s project won the top award in the chemistry division of the competition this year.
 
These are a few examples of the way that the best and the brightest in Arkansas are creating a business-friendly environment that also conserves our natural resources. I am confident that there will be more to come from these leaders in the future.
 
5-10-19 4:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

For students just beginning an education or going back to school, the lottery scholarship offers opportunities to pursue dream careers and secure financial futures.

 

That’s why you should mark July 1 on your calendar. That day is the deadline to apply for the Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship, which has provided hundreds of millions of dollars in proceeds to help in the pursuit of higher education.

 

The Academic Challenge Scholarship is largely funded by the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery and provides tuition assistance to students at every state university and two-year college – both public and private. Applicants can be recent high school graduates, students already enrolled in school or non-traditional students at any stage in life. Additionally, the scholarship can be combined with other financial aid programs, such as the ArFuture Grant.

 

This fall marks the 10-year anniversary of the Lottery. In that time, 542,307 in-state scholarships worth more than $965 million have been awarded to students seeking both four-year and two-year degrees.

 

Funds are awarded for the Academic Challenge Scholarship based on a system that incentivizes student success. Individuals enrolled in four-year institutions can receive $1,000 for the first year. Those who continue in school and meet eligibility criteria are rewarded with $4,000 for both sophomore and junior years and $5,000 for senior year. At two-year institutions, students receive $1,000 for the first year and $3,000 for the second.

 

To be eligible for an Academic Challenge Scholarship, traditional students must have a minimum ACT score of 19 and be in pursuit of a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or nursing school diploma. Non-traditional students need either a 19 on the ACT or a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) from the last education received. To maintain eligibility, students must keep a 2.5 GPA, take 30 hours each year and be an Arkansas resident for 12 months prior to enrollment.

 

Lottery proceeds also fund workforce training opportunities through the Arkansas Workforce Challenge Scholarship. This program pays for tuition and fees up to $800 per eligible program for high-demand occupations in healthcare, information technology and industry. Examples include dental assistants, aircraft mechanics and computer programmers. Students must apply at least 30 days prior to enrollment in an eligible program.

 

During the recent legislative session, a law was passed to allow excess lottery proceeds to fund concurrent credit scholarships for high school juniors and seniors seeking college credit. Act 465, the Arkansas Concurrent Challenge Scholarship, will be available in January 2020 and applications must be made through the student’s public high school. 

 

Applications for lottery-funded scholarships can be found at the Arkansas Department of Higher Education’s website at scholarships.adhe.edu. There you can fill out the Department’s YOUniversal application to determine eligibility for all of the state’s scholarship programs. Students can also download the YOUniversal financial aid app and apply directly from a smart phone. 

 

5-10-19 4:32 p.m.  KAWX.ORG

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Small Businesses Drive Our Economy

 

According to the Small Business Administration, Arkansas is home to more than 247,000 small businesses, which is over 99.3 percent of all businesses in our state.

 

These enterprises employ over 479,000 Arkansans, making it easy to see how big of an impact they have on our state’s economic climate.

 

In addition to powering the economy, small businesses also contribute to the communities they operate in.

 

They embody the American values and ideals that helped build our country—hard work, willingness to take risks and vision for opportunity.

 

That’s why the Senate recently recognized the importance of entrepreneurs by passing a resolution designating a week in May as “National Small Business Week.” I encourage people across Arkansas and throughout the country to support the small businesses in their communities.

 

This show of support certainly means a lot to the folks who own these companies and the employees who count on them to earn their livelihoods. It also serves as a way to further cultivate and reward the entrepreneurial spirit that is at the very heart of America.

 

It’s important that policymakers continue to listen to the concerns and advice of our entrepreneurs and those they employ. We can build on our positive economic growth by pursuing more policies that will help our small businesses succeed. 

 

We recognize and commend those who take this leap of faith while generating positive economic activity and benefits that help strengthen and sustain the system that has created more wealth for more people than any other in human history. 

 

This system underpins our society and is marked by the freedom and ability to make our own economic decisions. Those decisions have often led Americans to start businesses and become their own bosses. As a result, America’s small businesses are now, without question, the backbone of our economy.

 

During a recent visit in north central Arkansas, I met with several small business owners and their employees. Representatives from the Small Business Administration were on-hand for some of these meetings, underscoring the agency’s willingness and desire to help promote and assist small business owners and entrepreneurs with establishing or expanding their companies.

 

At each stop, the conversations provided me with invaluable insights about the challenges and opportunities these businesses face. The discussions also inevitably turned to how the economic climate has changed for the better in recent years. 

 

Our small businesses are even more competitive as the result of pro-growth policies like tax reform and regulatory relief, which have created certainty for entrepreneurs. These pro-growth policies have not only helped drastically uplift and improve America’s economy, but have also given business owners and entrepreneurs the confidence they had been lacking for so many years about whether to invest in or expand their operations.

 

I applaud the men and women in Arkansas and across the United States who work incredibly hard running their own businesses and chasing the American Dream. I am committed to empowering these entrepreneurs by promoting policies that encourage innovation and expansion.

 

5-10-19 3:44 p.m.   KAWX.ORG

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

 

LITTLE ROCK – Job training and workforce education are offered by numerous government entities in Arkansas. That’s part of the problem.

Overlap and duplication create confusion for people who want to improve their job skills, and they are inefficient uses of tax dollars.

 

With that in mind, legislators approved Act 1079 earlier this year, to bring all career education and workforce training into one system. They will be under a board known as the Career Education and Workforce Development Board, whose members will be appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate.

 

They will represent the agriculture, construction, energy, health care, information technology, manufacturing, financial services, hospitality, transportation and rehabilitative services industries. One of their primary duties will be to eliminate the duplication of efforts that now exists.

 

The preamble to Act 1079 notes that “significant inefficiencies” exist in job training efforts due to duplication. It may seem counterintuitive, but the overlaps and duplication also create gaps in course offerings, resulting from “important programs being overlooked as presumably covered by another program.”

 

The new Board is charged with bringing “consistency, efficiency, and rigor” to job training programs, and with ensuring that they measure up to industry standards.

 

Lawmakers enacted another new law this year to provide industry with more influence in job training. Act 55 changes the composition of the state 12-member Higher Education Coordinating Board, increasing from six to nine the number of members who shall be selected from business, industry, education, agriculturally related industry, and medical services, and who shall not be current members of a board of a public two-year college or four-year university.

 

Act 944 of 2019 is meant to increase the availability of job training courses offered by two-year colleges. It allows colleges to market themselves, offer courses and provider services to anyone in the state, regardless of the service area in which the person lives.

 

About 22 percent of Arkansas adults have earned a bachelor’s degree. About 31 percent have an associate’s degree or have attended college but not earned a bachelor’s.

 

For a person with a high school diploma, the most in-demand job is food preparation and serving of food. The second is retail sales.

 

The most in-demand job for people with an associate’s degree is driving a tractor-trailer or heavy truck, and the second is nursing assistant.

 

Of the jobs available to people with a bachelor’s degree, the most in-demand job is as a registered nurse. The second is general operations management.

 

One reason for the number and variety of job training programs is that there are numerous paths to employment. Some people enlist in the military, and then look for a job after their discharge. Some go straight into the job market from high school, while others take technical classes in college.

 

Some people learn job skills at adult education centers. Several agencies send instructors to local industries for people who already have jobs and who want to improve their skills. Some people enter the workforce through apprenticeship programs.

 

Others take job training and adult education courses that are required in order to receive Medicaid, food stamps or welfare. Some people have physical or learning disabilities, and get jobs after completing occupational therapy.

 

5-10-19 3:35 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for May 8, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

5-8-19 1:52 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments May 2nd, May 6th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 

 

State of Arkansas Vs.Anastasia Jennings, W/F, age 34, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Timothy Perales, W/M, age 35, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II" Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Vickie Ramirez, W/F, age 42, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Bradley J. Moss, W/M, age 43, Count I: Possession Of Methamphetamine With The Purpose To Deliver, a Class "B" Felony. Count II: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count III: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Alan Brian Cox, W/M, age 47, Count I-V: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count VI-VIII: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count IX-X: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count XI-XVIII: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Isiaha Sipe, W/M, age 21, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" felony. Count III: Driving On Suspended License, an Unclassified Misdemeanor.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Robert S. Williams, W/M, age 51, Count I: Probation Violation, a Class "B" Felony. Bond set at $10,000.00.

 

5-7-19 12:05 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

 

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MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR 19 ARKANSAS STATE TROOPERS KILLED IN LINE OF DUTY

 

 

STATE POLICE COMMISISON MEETING FOLLOWS CEREMONY   

 
A memorial service for the 19 Arkansas State Troopers who’ve died in the line of duty during the course of the department’s 84 year history is scheduled for 10 AM, Thursday (May 9th).  The ceremony will be conducted at the entry to the Arkansas State Police Hall of Honor inside administrative headquarters located at One State Police Plaza Drive, Little Rock.
 
Surviving family members will be joined by department commanders, both active and retired state troopers, state police commissioners and others.
Immediately following the memorial service, the Arkansas State Police Commission will convene at administrative headquarters in a regularly scheduled monthly meeting.
 
Upon adjournment of the meeting, one or more commissioners may meet with representatives of the Arkansas State Police Foundation.
 
5-7-19 4:42 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log April 29 - May 5

 

 

 

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of April 29 - May 5, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


April 29, 2019


Traffic stop on Polk 37 near Potter led to a Citation for Careless/Prohibited Driving being issued to Tanner L. Milham, 20, of Mena.
Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 87 near Ink led to the arrest of Sherri L. Benson, 52, and Tina M. Cole, 49, both of Mena, each on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.


Report from complainant on Polk 492 near Wickes of the theft of an ATV valued at $1,000.00.  Investigation continues.


Report from complainant on Polk 238 near Mena of their dog being shot.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


April 30, 2019


Arrested was Robert H Williams, 43, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance and Possession of a Firearm by Certain Person.  Also arrested was Nora M. Taylor, 38, of Cove, on two Warrants for Delivery of Meth/Cocaine.


Report from complainant on Polk 32 near Cove of the theft of a vehicle.  The vehicle was later located.


Report of vandalism to mailboxes on Polk 8 near Wickes led to Citations for Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree being issued to both Waylon A. Broach, 19, of Cove, and Eric L. Smith, Jr., 22, of Wickes.  Suspects agreed to pay for damages.


Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 87 near Ink led to the arrest of Sherri L. Benson, 52, and Shawna M. Morris, 22, both of Mena, each on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.


Report from complainant on Polk 662 near Cherry Hill of the theft of a generator, valued at $200.00.  Investigation continues.


Arrested was Donnie R. Dollarhyde, 45, of Mena, on a Child Support Warrant.


May 1, 2019


Report from walk-in complainant of concerns for their safety.  Deputy advised complainant of
options.


Report of a domestic disturbance on Polk 290 near Cove led to Citations for Disorderly Conduct being issued to both Cheyenne N. Smith, 24, and James L. Smith, Jr., 50, both of Cove.


Arrested was Ralph E. Asbury, 53, of White Hall, on a Warrant for Probation Violation.


Arrested was George Trivette, III, 26, of Mena, on a Drug Court Sanction.


Arrested was Anastasia E. Jennings, 34, of Mena, on Warrants for Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Failure to Comply with a Court Order.


Arrested was Christopher L. Chesser, 34, of Wickes, on Warrants for Criminal Mischief 1st Degree, Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree and a Parole Hold.


May 2, 2019


Report from several complainants in the Mena area of attempted theft by deception.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


Report of a domestic disturbance on Highway 71 North near Mena led to the arrest of Crystal M. Glover, 26, and Zea Hibbs, 26, both of Mena, each on a Charge of Domestic Battery 3rd Degree.


Report of a disoriented person on Highway 71 South near Wickes.  Deputy responded.


Report from complainant on Polk 18 near Vandervoort of damage done to a mailbox.  Investigation continues.


May 3, 2019


Report from complainant on Polk 10 near Wickes of damage done to a mailbox.  Investigation continues.


Arrested was Robert I. Pierce, 40, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.


May 4, 2019

 

Report of a disturbance on Polk 11 near Wickes led to the arrest of Ricky J. Nunn, 37, of Cove, on a Charge of Public Intoxication.


Report from complainant on Polk 76 East near Mena of the theft of a chainsaw, valued at $200.00.  Investigation continues.


May 5, 2019


Traffic stop on Highway 71 South near Hatfield led to the arrest of Isiaha T. Sipe, 21, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License and Vehicle Equipment Violation.


A Citation for Disorderly Conduct was issued to Kaleb Rushin, 18, of Mena.


Report from walk-in complainant of an assault that had occurred earlier.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


Report of a disturbance on Polk 189 near Mena led to the arrest of Christopher N. Robertson, 25, of Mena, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.


Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Vandervoort of possible stolen items.  Deputy responded.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked five vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 26 Incarcerated Inmates , with 6 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00323

 

5-6-19   4:05 p.m.   KAWX.ORG

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Mena Police Department Report for April 28th - May 4th

 

 

Mena Police Department Reports for the Week of April 28, 2019 through May 4, 2019

 

April 28, 2019

 

Two Mena youths, ages 13 and 15, were charged with theft of property (shoplifting) and criminal mischief after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.  A third boy, age 15, was later issued a citation stemming from the incident.  Case has been referred to juvenile authorities.

 

Officers answered a call concerning a stolen lawn mower from the yard of a house in Mena.  No suspects at this time.

 

A 14-year-old Mena girl was cited for curfew violation and disorderly conduct after officers were called to a residence in Mena.  Case has been referred to juvenile authorities.

 

April 29, 2019

 

Thomas Wayne Goger, 31. Of Mena was charged with third degree battery.  The arrest followed a call to a local residence.

 

Amanda Walters, 30, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from the Mena Police Department.

 

A 15-year-old Mena girl was charged with disorderly conduct.  Juvenile authorities were notified.

 

Ashton Eldridge, 22 was arrested on an outstanding warrant from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.

 

Sarah Mitchell, 25, of Mena was arrested on two outstanding warrants from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.

 

April 30, 2019

 

A Mena woman reported that someone had broken into her vehicle at her residence and had stolen her purse.  No suspects at this time.

 

May 1, 2019

 

Kenneth Lee Clements, 55, of Mena was charged with public intoxication.  The arrest followed a call to a local neighborhood.

 

John Fagan, 51, of Mena was served a warrant for failure to pay child support.

 

Robert Scott Williams, 31, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant for probation violation.

 

May 2, 2019

 

Lonnie Gene Tyler, 50, of Mena was charged with third degree assault.  The arrest followed a call regarding a fight at a local residence.

 

Kevin Lee Fryar, 33, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.

 

May 3, 2019

 

Leroy Crawford, 68, of Mena was charged with shoplifting after a call to a local retail store.  Also charged in the incident with criminal trespass was Donna Price, 67, also of Mena.

 

Lee Wisnoski,44, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.  He was also ticketed for having no vehicle license.

 

Bradley Joe Moss, 43, of Mena was charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, and no liability insurance.  He was additionally served an outstanding warrant for probation violation.

 

Alan Bryan Cox, 47, of Cove was served an outstanding warrant from the Polk County Sheriff’s office.

 

May 4, 2019

 

Timothy Wade Perales, 35, of Mena was charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, and driving on a suspended driver’s license.  The arrest followed an investigation by local authorities.

 

Matthew Alan Shelley, 20, of Mena was charged with DWI, second offense, possession of alcohol by a minor, possession of marijuana, and careless driving.  The arrest followed a call regarding a one vehicle accident.

 

David Fraser, 50, of Mena was arrested on three outstanding warrants for failure to pay fines and court costs.  He was also cited for driving on a suspended driver's license, having no vehicle tags, and having no insurance on the vehicle.

 

5-6-19 1:24 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Public Meeting Concerning Mena Parks and Recreation Needs

The City of Mena invites its citizens and other interested persons to a drop-in public meeting at City Fire Station No. 2 located at 1100 Mena Street in Mena on Thursday, May 9, 2019 from 4:30pm to 6:30pm.
 
The purpose of the meeting is to identify potential outdoor park and recreation needs and priorities. Following the identification process, city officials will select those priorities to be submitted to the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism for an Outdoor Recreation Matching Grant application. 
 
Ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, senior citizens, and special interest groups are encouraged to attend and participate.
 
Please make plans to drop in and share your thoughts!
 
For those unable to attend the meeting, you may phone 479-394-3141. Written comments may be submitted to City of Mena, 520 Mena Street, Mena, AR 71953.
 
5-5-19 5:46 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address Computer Science: Arkansas’s Bright Future
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – As most people know, computer science education has been one of my top priorities since I ran for governor in 2014.
 
In my second month as governor, I signed a law that required every high school to offer a class in computer science. Arkansas was the first state in the nation to do this, and we allocated $5 million every two years to train educators to teach coding and to provide technical support.
 
Every so often, someone asks me why I say that Arkansas is leading the nation in computer science education. I’m glad they ask because that is not just the boast of a proud governor.
 
That is the opinion of national organizations such as Wired magazine and Code.org.
 
Education Week noted that our emphasis on teacher training sets us apart from other states. Mark R. Nelson, the executive director of the Computer Science Teachers Association, told the magazine he didn’t know “of any other state that has done more than Arkansas. They have a really strong, multifaceted plan that is well thought out. … The state is far better off than anyone else.”
 
Enthusiasm for coding exceeded my expectations, and our numbers back up our reputation. When I became governor, only 1,100 students in the entire state were enrolled in a computer science class.
 
This school year, the number rose to more than 8,000, an increase of 620 percent. The number of girls enrolled in computer science has increased from 223 in 2014 to almost 2,500 this year. That is an increase of over 1,000 percent during the last four years.
 
As part of my computer science initiative, I have visited with hundreds of students and teachers at 72 high schools around the state on my coding tour. This week I completed the eighth tour.
 
At Buffalo Island, students have developed software that will detect CO2 emissions from soil. At West Memphis, a 6-year-old showed me a watch he has programmed. At Kirby, they are developing a robot that will help stop an active shooter at school. Another school developed software that matches students with scholarships.
 
These students are tackling problems with coding. That’s what this is all about.
 
Our teachers are stepping up as well, such as the French teacher in Manila who teaches computer science because she saw the need. And the assistant football coach in Beebe who answered the call from his principal to make the switch.
 
As part of the celebration of our success, this week we named the Computer Science Educator of the Year in a news conference at the capitol. The four finalists are Carl Frank of the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences, and the Arts; Josefina Perez, Springdale High School; Brenda Qualls, Bryant High School; and Kimberly Raup, Conway High School.
 
Arkansas’s first Computer Science Educator of the Year is Karma Turner of Lake Hamilton High School. Karma taught math for 21 years. In 2016, she taught her first coding class. Now she teaches computer science levels one through four.
 
Like the state at large, you can see Karma’s success in her numbers. This school year, 95 students were enrolled in her classes; 140 have signed up for next year.
 
When people ask me why I say we are leading the nation in computer science education, I can point them to the students in the classroom.
 
However you look at it, computer science education in Arkansas is leading the way to a bright future.
 
5-3-19 5:36 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 

Improving Access to Broadband

 

President Trump recently met with Democratic congressional leaders to discuss the potential for advancing an infrastructure package this Congress. In addition to investments in roads, railways and air travel, the discussion included expansion of broadband access. Incorporating the deployment of high-speed, reliable broadband into any infrastructure efforts must be a priority.

 

Broadband investment strengthens our economy and expands opportunities for healthcare, agriculture and education. There is a need for improvement, particularly in rural areas. As a rural state, there are more challenges to providing Arkansans access to the minimum speed of wired broadband that experts agree is functional: 25 megabits per second.

 

In February, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a draft of its 2019 Broadband Deployment Report that showed growth in broadband connectivity nationwide. Despite the positive gains, internet access in rural areas of our state continues to be insufficient to meet the needs of residents. Arkansas ranks as the 48th most connected state, according to the FCC.

 

As a founder and co-chair of the Senate Broadband Caucus, I’m leading efforts to find solutions that will close the existing digital divide. This Congress, the caucus will be facilitating the use of accurate broadband maps. Updated coverage surveys will help us underscore where resources need to be deployed in order to bring broadband to underserved areas.

 

Earlier this month, I joined my fellow caucus co-chairs to introduce the Measuring the Economic Impact of Broadband Act. This legislation will result in reliable data collection on the economic impact of broadband on our nation’s economy. This information will allow the public and private sectors to target investments to increase connectivity in Arkansas.

 

Support for the expansion of rural broadband was included in the 2018 Farm Bill. The bill that President Trump signed into law late last year allows the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to leverage grants and loans with loan guarantees to fund projects that deploy high-speed broadband in rural America. Coupled with the December 2018 launch of USDA’s ReConnect Program to facilitate broadband deployment, the farm bill’s policy changes will increase opportunities for rural areas to get resources to bridge the digital divide. 

 

Arkansas organizations are taking advantage of these tools to promote connectivity. Earlier this year, Arkansas Rural Internet Service (ARIS), a partnership between Ouachita Electric Cooperative and South Arkansas Telephone Company, announced it received nearly $20 million in loan funding from USDA to deploy broadband in the region. USDA continues to promote its grant and loan programs and share how telecommunications companies, rural electric cooperatives, internet providers and communities can apply for these resources.

 

Members of my staff recently attended a broadband roundtable at the University of Arkansas at Monticello organized by Congressman Bruce Westerman to highlight opportunities for stakeholders in Drew and Ashley counties. I am hopeful this outreach will encourage more applicants intent on helping to increase connectivity in rural Arkansas.

 

Students in every public school across the state are now using high-speed broadband, which is another indication of just how vital reliable internet access continues to be within our 21st century society and economy.

 

Broadband is an important tool that we must provide all Arkansans access to in order to improve quality of life and economic opportunity. I look forward to working with my colleagues, the FCC and industry leaders to ensure all Arkansans have the ability to use broadband internet and enjoy the abundant benefits it provides.

 

5-3-19 11:48 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

 

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

May 3, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The Division of Youth Services (DYS) has already begun to make sweeping changes in how the state treats juvenile offenders.

The Division announced that the first day of May marked the beginning of a new approach for meeting the needs of youthful offenders.

 

The new changes mean that a team of staff will tailor an individual treatment plan for each offender, and the team will discuss that plan in person with the youths and their families. Previously, staff talked over the telephone with the youth’s family.

 

The team who personally meet with youths and families will be larger and more specialized than previously. They will include an education specialist, a nurse, a behavioral health clinician, an independent living expert and a behavior modification specialist. With the family, they will review the results of every assessment that the youths have gone through.

 

The DYS announcement specifically mentioned the availability of drug abuse treatment for teenagers who get in trouble with the law. The Division has contracted with an organization that can house youths in a group home while treating them for substance abuse.

 

Also, the Division is opening a residential facility in Harrisburg for females. It will be at the Harrisburg Juvenile Treatment Center and will open by the end of May and will provide personalized treatment for girls.

 

The new approach to treatment, and the renewed emphasis on keeping young offenders in their local communities, is part of a statewide effort to completely restructure the DYS system. Many of the changes are authorized in Act 189 of 2019, which requires all juvenile judges to rely on a uniform risk assessment system.

 

A goal is to eliminate the severe disparities in treatment of juvenile offenders, which resulted in teenagers from some parts of the state being sentenced to lockups for relatively minor offenses.

 

Judges will be required to rely on uniform sentencing standards, but they also will have more options. Some youths may be required to attend structured, after-school programs in their hometowns, rather than being sent across the state to a secure lockup.

 

DYS is in the process of contracting with organizations that will provide residential treatment for juvenile sex offenders, as well as substance abuse treatment. Also, the Division will contract with an organization to operate a therapeutic group home.

 

Every year, about 350 youths get in trouble and are placed in the custody of DYS by a court.

 

The changes at DYS are meant to provide youths with the most appropriate treatment, in the least restrictive setting. The Division has closed secure lockups, and is expanding the use of group homes that are not surrounded by fencing.

 

In related news, the DYS operation of secure detention facilities is in litigation. The Division is in the process of contracting with a private firm to run secure detention facilities in Dermott, Harrisburg, Lewisville and Mansfield.

 

The Nevada company that originally got the contract was disqualified after a competitor from Indiana filed a complaint, which referred to past problems the Nevada company had while running a juvenile lockup in Colorado. The Indiana firm got the contract and the Nevada firm sued to win it back. The contract was for one year and valued at $15.8 million.

 

A spokesman for DYS said that the Division is poised to turn over the juvenile facilities to a private operator by July 1.

 

5-3-19 11:01 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Dean and June Wiles Named Polk County Farm Family of the Year

Dean and Junes Wiles have been selected as the 2019 Arkansas Farm Family of the Year for Polk County.

 

County farm families for the 72nd annual Arkansas Farm Family of the Year Program have been selected.

 

The county winners will be visited by a set of judges to determine the eight district winners, who will be announced June 17. They will be visited again by a different set of judges in July to determine a state winner, who will be announced Dec. 12 at the Farm Family of the Year luncheon in North Little Rock.

 

The county winners are:

 

East Central District

 

  • Lee – Jeff Hickman, Marianna
  • Lonoke – I.F. Anderson Farms Inc., Lonoke
  • Monroe – Curtis Kirkpatrick Family, Holly Grove
  • Prairie – Chris Berg Family, Stuttgart
  • Pulaski – Jeremy, Emily and Benjamin Bemis, Little Rock
  • St. Francis – Hobbs Family, Colt
  • White – Lester and Ouida Cossey Family with Flying C Ranch, Searcy
  • Woodruff – Johnny W. and Jennifer Taylor, McCrory

North Central District

 

  • Baxter – Wes Henderson Family, Mountain Home
  • Cleburne – Eldon and Anne Fry, Quitman
  • Fulton – Justin and Rachel Luther
  • Independence – Kenny and Edwina Hurley, Cushman
  • Izard – Bo and Whitney Lord Family, Evening Shade
  • Marion – Mike and Darcy King Family, Yellville
  • Searcy – Triple T Cattle Company, Marshall
  • Sharp – The Nathan and Eddie Walling Families, Cave City
  • Stone – Jerry and Barbara Davis, Marcello
  • Van Buren – Alan and Angela Mahan with Rabbit Ridge Farms, Bee Branch

Northeast District

 

  • Clay – David Hatcher Family, Corning
  • Craighead – Heath and Mari Ann McGaughey, Lake City
  • Crittenden – Cooper Morrison, Earle
  • Cross – Matthews Sweet Potato Farm, Wynne
  • Greene – Pillow Fish Farm and Family, Paragould
  • Jackson – Young’s Generation Three Partnership Farms, Tuckerman
  • Lawrence – Steve Graham, Alicia
  • Mississippi – Robinson Melon Farms, Leachville
  • Poinsett – Jason and Tabithia Mullins, Trumann
  • Randolph – Weitkamp Farms Partnership, Pocahontas

Northwest District

 

  • Benton – Kevin and Jacqueline Smith Family, Decator
  • Boone – Jeff and Debbie Atkinson, Harrison
  • Carroll – Josh and Tonya McMahan, Green Forest
  • Crawford – Richard and Earlene Boone, Natural Dam
  • Franklin – Michael and Kasey Post, Altus
  • Johnson – Tanner and Amy Storment, Flat Rock
  • Madison – Greg Wheeler, Combs
  • Newton – Gene Davidson Family, Kingston
  • Washington – Pitts Family, Lincoln

Southeast District

 

  • Arkansas, N. – Chris and Heather Simpson, Stuttgart
  • Arkansas, S. – Gary and Meagan Padget, Almyra
  • Ashley – Brad Graham, Portland
  • Desha – Tony Wells, McGehee
  • Drew – Eubanks Farms, Wilmar
  • Jefferson – Dewayne Goldmon Family with Dell-Cam Farm, Inc., Pine Bluff
  • Lincoln – Johnathan and Sara Bottoms, Gould
  • Phillips – John and Kaleb Hall, Elaine

Southwest District

 

  • Bradley – Hamilton Farms, Hermitage
  • Calhoun – Allen Primm, Hampton
  • Hempstead – Donald and B.J. Hampton, Hope
  • Lafayette – Jamie and Kalen Knighton, Lewisville
  • Little River – La Voice Family, Ashdown
  • Nevada – Mike Cottingham, Prescott
  • Union – Charles and Debbie Foot, Tinsley

Western District

 

  • Conway – Duvall Farms, Hattieville
  • Faulkner – Schaefers Brothers Farms, Conway
  • Logan – Clark and Tori Parker, Magazine
  • Montgomery – Bob and Denise McCord with Dixieland Farm, Norman
  • Perry – Steve and Flora Harrington Family, Casa
  • Polk – Dean and June Wiles, Mena
  • Pope – Rusty and Rebecca Davis, Russellville
  • Yell – Dusty and Melanie Walker

West Central District

 

  • Clark – Stockton Family Farm, Okolona
  • Cleveland – Gary and Melody Spears, Rison
  • Dallas – Michael and Cecilia Berry with Bluebird Farm, Sparkman
  • Grant – Chad and Katie Harper, Prattsville
  • Hot Spring – Chris and Piper Nelson, Malvern
  • Howard – The Greene Family, Athens
  • Saline – Renae Breckling, Benton
  • Sevier – Josh and Marilyn Momrris, Gillham 
  •  

“The Arkansas Farm Family of the Year program recognizes great farmers and ranchers each year,” said Randy Veach, president, Arkansas Farm Bureau. “These families are involved in noble and important work to provide food, fiber and shelter to the world.

"Congratulations to these great farm families. We are pleased to honor their success, stewardship and commitment to Arkansas agriculture."

Since 1947, the Arkansas Farm Family of the Year Program has served as a vehicle to recognized outstanding farm families throughout the state. The objectives of the Farm Family of the Year program is, 

  • To give recognition and encouragement to farm families who are doing an outstanding job on their farm and in their community;
  • To gain recognition of the importance of agriculture in the community and state;
  • To disseminate information on improved farm practices and management.
  •  

The Farm Family of the Year program begins each year with the selection of top farm families in each county and culminates in December with the selection of the state Farm Family of the Year who will then go on to represent Arkansas at the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year. Arkansas has had two overall winners, Brian and Nan Kirksey of Clark County in 2008 and Wildy Family Farms of Mississippi County in 2016. All winners are judged on their farm production, efficiency, management, family life and rural/community leadership. 

 

Sponsors of the Farm Family of the Year program are Arkansas Farm Bureau, the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas, and the three Farm Credit agencies that serve Arkansas: AgHeritage Farm Credit Services, Farm Credit of Western Arkansas and Midsouth Farm Credit. Additionally, support for the program is provided by the Arkansas Agriculture Department, Arkansas Department of Career Education, Arkansas Press Association, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and the USDA’s Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service and Rural Development. 

 

Arkansas Farm Bureau is a nonprofit, private advocacy organization of more than 190,000 families throughout the state working to improve farm and rural life.

 

5-2-19 11:04 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekly Fishing Report

 

Weekly Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s fishing report for May 1, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email AGFCfishingreport@outlook.com with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

5-1-19 6:51 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments April 25th, April 29th, May 1st

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Zachary Cochran, W/M, age 22, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession With The Purpose To Deliver Counterfeit Substance, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Kacey Murray, W/F, age 33, Count I: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession With The Purpose To Deliver A Counterfeit Substance, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Derek Wayne Tarkington, W/M, age 27, Count I Domestic Battery In The Third Degree, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Aggravated Assault On A Family Member Or Household Member, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Interference With Emergency Communications In The First Degree, a Class "A" Misdemeanor.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Derek Wayne Tarkington, W/M, age 27, Count I: Forgery In The Second Degree, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Thomas W. Goger, W/M, age 31, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. 

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Nora Wallace Taylor, W/F, age 38, Count I: Delivery Of Methamphetamine Or Cocaine, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Nora Wallace Taylor, W/F, age 38, Count I: Delivery Of Methamphetamine Or Cocaine, a Class "C" Felony.

 

State of Arkansas Vs. Robert Williams, W/M, age 43, Count I: Possession of Methamphetamine With The Purpose To Deliver, a Class "C" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Firearms By Certain Persons, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Simultaneous Possession Of Drugs And Firearms, a Class "Y" Felony.

 

5-1-19 6:40 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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