KAWX News Archives for 2019-10

Facebook Censorship Shuts Down KAWX Page, Polk County Severe Weather Page

Facebook, without any warning or explanation, has blocked KAWX from posting new content (weather, severe weather warnings, local news, obituaries, important announcements) on our pages: KAWX Radio, Mena - Polk News & Weather, and Mena - Polk Severe Weather.

 

Please follow us on Twitter and visit our website KAWX.ORG where we will continue to post the the information many of you depend on us for.

 

For Polk County, Arkansas Severe Weather posts on Twitter follow @MenaPolk.

 

10-31-19 7:42 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Mena Street Closures For Downtown Trick Or Treating

 

Downtown trick or treating will be from 4:30 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. Thursday in Mena.

 

Mena Street will be closed from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm on Thursday, October 31, 2019 for Downtown Trick or Treat. 

 

Closures include Mena Street from Sherwood Avenue to Maple Avenue; Sherwood Avenue from Mena Street to DeQueen Street; and Mena Street from Highway 71 to Oak Avenue.

 

Please drive with extra care Thursday as children will be trick or treating around Mena!

 

 

10-30-19 7:59 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Arkansas Century Farm Program Honors 46 Farms Including Wiles Family Farm In Polk County

The Arkansas Century Farm Program Honors 46 Farms from 30 Counties including the Wiles Family Farm in Polk County which was established in 1889.

 

LITTLE ROCK, AR – Governor Asa Hutchinson and Arkansas Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward inducted 46 Arkansas farms into the Arkansas Century Farm Program at the State Capitol on Monday, Oct. 28th.

 

The Arkansas Century Farm program recognizes Arkansas farms of 10 acres or more owned by the same family for at least 100 years. Arkansas Department of Agriculture began the Century Farm program in 2012 to highlight the contributions of these families to the agriculture industry as well as their overall contributions to our state.

 

Agriculture is Arkansas’s largest industry, contributing more than $21 billion to the state’s economy annually and providing one in every six jobs in the state. Arkansas consistently ranks in the top 25 nationally in the production of more than 15 agricultural commodities.

 

“How reassuring that we are adding more families to the Arkansas Century Farm Program,” Governor Hutchinson said. “Families who have held on to their farms for generations lend a sense of continuity in a time of frequent change. These families pass down more than the knowledge of farming. They are handing down love of family and an ethic of hard work as well as a love for the land.”

 

Including the 2019 inductees, 464 farms are currently recognized as Arkansas Century Farms. The 46 newly inducted Century Farms are located in the following 30 counties:  Arkansas, Benton, Clay, Conway, Drew, Faulkner, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Howard, Independence, Izard, Lawrence, Lincoln, Little River, Logan, Lonoke, Mississippi, Monroe, Nevada, Poinsett, Polk, Prairie, Scott, Searcy, Sebastian, Sharp, Stone, Union, and Woodruff.

 

Applications for the 2020 Century Farm Inductees will open in February. For questions about the Arkansas Century Farm program, contact Mary Elizabeth Lea at maryelizabeth.lea@agriculture.arkansas.gov.

 

Find a complete list of all Arkansas Century Farms here.

 

Find the photo gallery of inductees with Governor Hutchinson here.

 

The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is dedicated to the development and implementation of policies and programs for Arkansas agriculture and forestry to keep its farmers and ranchers competitive in national and international markets while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of the state and nation. Visit aad.arkansas.gov.

 

10-30-19 6:18 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Oct. 30, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state you are interested in below for the current fishing inforamtion.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

10-30-19 4:33 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

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Local Candidate Filing Period for 2020 Elections Opens Monday, November 4th

 
The filing period opens Monday, November 4th at noon and closes Tuesday, November 12th at noon for 2020 elections, according to Polk County Clerk Terri Harrison.
 
Party candidates will see their party representative first to pay party filing fees.  The Republican Party will be set up in the basement of the Polk County Courthouse.  The Democratic Party will be set up in the Quorum Court room of the Polk County Office Complex on Pine Street.  Once you pay your filing fee with your party, you will then go to the County Clerk's Office to file.  
 
Independent Candidates will need to go to the County Clerk's Office to file during this same filing period.  They will file as a candidate and then must also gather signatures on a petition to get put on the ballot, however, petitions shall not be circulated until February 1, 2020.  Petitions must be filed in the County Clerk's Office no later than 12:00 p.m. (noon) on May 1, 2020.  
 
Positions up for re-election are JP Districts 1-11, all constable positions, Mena School Board positions 1 and 2, Ouachita River School Board Zone 6, and Cossatot River School Board Zone 2 and Zone 4.
 
Incumbents planning to seek re-election or anyone interested in running should contact the County Clerk's office at (479) 394-8123 or visit the County Clerk's office in the Polk County Courthouse at 507 Church Street in Mena for additional information.
 
10-30-19 11:11 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Community Radio KAWX To Broadcast 1938 War Of The Worlds Radio Drama October 31st

 

On Sunday night, October 30, 1938, 81 years ago today, the CBS Mercury Theater of the Air broadcast a radio play by Orson Welles, based on the book War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells, causing widespread panic across the country as many believed it to be real news reports about a Martian invasion near Grovers Mill, New Jersey.

 

War of the Worlds gave Americans an idea of just how powerful the relatively new technology could be, even though the original intent was not to deceive or scare people, but to entertain. 

 

 

Many Americans were in church that Sunday night. My father, James L. Daniel, was 12 years old and told me the story many times about a local man int he small sawmill town of Wright City, Oklahoma that came into the Baptist church proclaiming loudly that the world was ending, disrupting the service. As panic swept the nation, police departments were overwhelmed with calls. It would be several days before all knew that what they had heard was just a drama intended to entertain.

 

For the second year in a row, starting with the 80th anniversary of the broadcast last year, Community Radio KAWX will air the entire one hour War of the Worlds on Thursday, October 31st at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

Listen in the Mena area on 93.1 FM, in the Hatfield - Cove - Vandervoort area on 94.9 FM, anywhere in the world at KAWX.ORG (look for the Listen Live tab), with a free KAWX app available at the App Store or Google Play, on any smart device with the TuneIn app, or on Amazon Echo.

 

KAWX also broadcasts other vintage radio programs on a regular basis. Weekdays at 6:30 p.m. Lum and Abner, starring Mena's Chet Lauck and Norris Goff, and at 7:00 p.m. Fibber McGee and Molly starring Jim and Marian Jordan, as well as others on a seasonal basis.

 

Chris Daniel, Manager KAWX 

10-30-19 7:56 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Flags to Half Staff In Tribute To Representative John Walker

Governor Asa Hutchinson has directed the United States flag and the state flag of Arkansas to fly at half-staff in tribute to the memory of State Representative John Walker, who passed away Monday morning. The flags will remain at half-staff from sunrise Tuesday, October 29, 2019, to sunset on the day of interment.

 

Governor Hutchinson also issued the following statement on the passing of Representative Walker:

 

It is with much sadness that Susan and I learned of the passing of Rep. John Walker. For years, I followed his work as a civil rights attorney and advocate. For the last five years, I have had the opportunity to see John ably and passionately represent his constituents as a member of the General Assembly. John always was a gentleman and proved every day that you can get along with people even though there may be disagreements. He worked tirelessly for the causes he championed and for the people he represented. We will miss his service to our state. Our prayers are with his family and loved ones."

 

Governor Hutchinson's Proclamation can be viewed HERE.

 

10-29-19 10:12 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Shady Grove Fire & Rescue Chili Supper Fundraiser This Saturday

Shady Grove Fire & Rescue's annual chili supper fund raiser will be this Saturday, November 2nd, beginning at 5:00 p.m. at firehouse located on Polk County Road 49 which is two miles west of Mena on Highway 8 West.

 

The fire department will be serving chili and soup with all the fixings and there will also be homemade desserts, all for a donation to the fire department.

 

Come spend an evening supporting your volunteer fire department and visiting your neighbors!

 

10-29-19 6:38 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Wickes Church To Host Trunk or Treat

The Wickes Church of The Nazarene will host a Trunk or Treat event for kids of Thursday, October 31, 2019 starting at 7:00 p.m. The church is located on Highway 71 in Wickes.


10-29-19 6:30 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Report for October 21st - 27th

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of October 21 – October 27, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


October 21, 2019
Report of a disturbance on Highway 375 West near Potter led to the arrest of Tyra N. Cornelius, 34, of Mena, on a Charge of Driving While Intoxicated.  Additional information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report of a structure fire on Polk 36 near Hatfield.  Deputies responded.
Report from complainant on Butler Circle in Hatfield of damage done to a satellite dish and pole.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


October 22, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 42 near Mena of an unauthorized person on their property.  The subject was advised to not return to the property.
Report from complainant on Bobby Lane near Board Camp of the fraudulent use of their identity.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 654 near Ink of the fraudulent use of their identity.  Investigation continues.


October 23, 2019
Report from complainant on School Street in Cove of the theft of an ATV.  The ATV was later returned to the owner.


October 24, 2019
Report of a vehicle partially in the roadway on Highway 8 East near Nunley.  Deputy responded.
Arrested was Chelsey R. Edwards, 20, of Mena, on a Warrant for Harassment.


October 25, 2019
Arrested was Malcolm R. Wells, 33, of Mena, on Warrants for Furnishing Prohibited Articles, Probation Violation and a Body Attachment Warrant.


October 26, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Cove of the break-in to a storage unit and the theft of jewelry, a knife set, dishes and phones.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Council Lane near Mena of the theft of a microwave, two lawn mowers and baby clothes.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 4 West in Cove of the theft of an ATV, valued at $5,000.00.  Investigation continues.


October 27, 2019
Report from complainant on Love Lee Lane near Potter of damage done to mailboxes.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South in Cove of the break-in to a storage unit and the theft of a vehicle.  Investigation continues.
Traffic stop on Polk 92 near Shady Grove led to the arrest of David M. Fraser, 51, of Mena, on Charges of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License and Failure to Register a Vehicle.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Cove of the theft of tools and supplies, home goods, kitchen wares, furniture, antiques and jewelry, all valued at $2,455.00.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Stephanie Lane near Grannis of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Investigation continues.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked four vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 21 Incarcerated Inmates , with 14 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00761

 

10-28-19 2:38 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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This Weekend At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

For more information about any of the activities this weekend at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena, dial (479) 394-2863, or visit the park's website by clicking here.

 

Friday, November 1

 

Fall Foliage Walk 11:15 am. Meet on the north side of Lovers’ Leap. Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take an easy stroll to the Lovers' Leap observation deck and observer the fall foliage along the way.

 

Wonder House Tour 2:00 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Arkansas Symbols 4:00 pm. Lasting about  30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. Do you know the symbols of Arkansas? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and find out our state drink, cooking vessel, bird and much more!

 

Arkansas Furs 6:30 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. What animals do we have here at Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will talk about the animals that we have here in the park and you will get to feel their furs.

 

Saturday, November 2

 

Color Hike 11:15 am. Lasting about 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater. With fall in season, join Park Interpreter Melissa on a 1/2-mile hike to see how many different colors we can identify on the Spring Trail.

 

Finding the Uniqueness 2:00 pm. Lasting about 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater. Queen Wilhelmina State Park is a unique resource filled with special things you can discover while you are here. Join Park Interpreter Melissa to learn unique aspects about our park.

 

Wonder House Tour 3:00 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Hearth Room Chat 7:00 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. Have you ever wondered why we are called Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we gather around the fireplace and learn why we’re called Queen Wilhelmina State Park.

 

Sunday, November 3

 

Home Sweet Home 9:00 am. lasting about  1 hour and 30 minutes. Meet at the Lovers’ Leap Trailhead. Meet Park Interpreter Melissa for a hike through our neighbors’ homes. Learn of all the different animals and their habitats as we hike at Queen Wilhelmina. We will start on the north side of the Lovers’ Leap trail.

 

Wonder House Tour 2:00 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Edible Insects 4:00 pm. Lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. Are eating bugs a real thing? Join park interpreter Melissa and see who really eats bugs. If you’re brave enough you can join the “I Ate A Bug Club!” Bring your appetite and take a bite, or come and watch!

 

10-28-19 11:43 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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November Activities At Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area Near Wickes

There are many activities scheduled for November at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area near Wickes. For more information on the activities listed below, or the state park, dial (870) 385-2201 or visit the park's website by clicking here

 

Sunday, November 3rd

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Autumn Hike (1 hour) Join a park interpreter to enjoy a short hike on the River Corridor Trail. Join a park interpreter to learn some tips that will help you identify many of the trees that are found along the trail. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Cossatot Craft Corner (1 hour) Do you enjoy being creative? Would you like to begin earning an explorer badge? Join a park interpreter to use your creativity, have fun, and discover something special that can be found in the park. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

Saturday, November 9th

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Leaf Creations (1 hour) Join a park interpreter for a fun nature craft. We will be creating animals using colorful autumn leaves and twigs. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Autumn Hike (1.5 hour) Join a park interpreter to enjoy a short hike on the River Corridor Trail. We will discover how trees play an important role in protecting the Cossatot River. We will also learn some tips that will help you identify many of the trees that are found along the trail. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

Sunday, November 10th

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Owl’s Last Supper (1 hour) Are you inquisitive and brave? If so, try to stomach this fascinating, hands-on activity. We’ll search for clues to solve the mystery of an owl’s last supper by dissecting an owl pellet. All materials are provided for this sanitary discovery opportunity. Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Tracks and Trace (1 hour) Do you know what the first thing to discover about tracking is? Can you identify whose foot print is whose and where they were going? Join a park interpreter in this fun activity and make an animal track craft to take home. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

Saturday, November 16th

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Autumn Hike (1 hour) Join a park interpreter to enjoy a short hike on the River Corridor Trail. We will discover how trees play an important role in protecting the Cossatot River. We will also learn some tips that will help you identify many of the trees that are found along the trail. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Skins and Skulls (1 hour) Have you ever felt the fur of an otter, or seen a foxes’ skull? Meet a park interpreter to discover more about the furry animals here at Cossatot River State Park. Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.

 

Sunday, November 17th 

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Morning Stroll (1 hour) Join a park interpreter for this moderate hike along the River Corridor Trail. Feel free to bring binoculars; who knows what we will see or stir up. Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Bundle Up! (1 hour) It is getting cold outside and it is the time of year for us to break out our coats and make hot cocoa to stay warm. Join a park interpreter to learn about the animals that live here and how they stay warm to survive the winter. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Amphitheatre.

 

Saturday, November 23rd

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Cast Iron Breakfast Demonstration (1 hour) Cast iron cookware has been used for centuries and is a popular method of cooking outdoors today. Join a park interpreter to learn more about cooking with cast iron and taste a sample of a Cast Iron breakfast. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Amphitheatre.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Dutch Oven Dessert Demonstration (1 hour) Cast iron cookware has been used for centuries and is a popular method of cooking outdoors today. Join a park interpreter to learn more about cooking with cast iron and taste a sample of a Cast Iron dessert. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Amphitheatre.

 

Sunday, November 24th

 

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Pioneer Games and Toys (1 hour) The past times enjoyed a century ago are not so different from the ones we enjoy today. Join a park interpreter to learn about a few of the pioneers’ favorite past times. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry! Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Plant to Pantry (30 mins.) The Grist Mills used in communities surrounding Cossatot River State Park- Natural Area provided food to Arkansans by taking grains from the plant to the pantry. Visit with a park interpreter to see a grist mill and learn how it operates. Meeting Place: Visitor Center. 

 

Saturday, November 30th

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. What If You Had Animal Hair (1 hour) What if one day when you woke up, the hair on your head wasn’t yours? What if, overnight, a wild animal’s hair grew in, instead? Join a park interpreter to discover why the wild animals living at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area have the hair they do and how it helps them survive. Meeting Place: Visitor Center.

 

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Bird Feeder Craft (1 hour) It is winter time and our feathered friends need some help to survive winter. Join a park interpreter to make bird feeders for your wintering birds. Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.

 

10-29-19 11:18 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Monthly Sales Tax Report Released For Polk County

 

Polk County Treasurer Tanya K. Fretz has released the monthly Sales Tax Report for October 2019. The amounts reported in October reflect collections for the previous month.

 
Both the Sales Tax General and Road Improvement Sales Tax are 1% taxes on retail sales. 
 
The taxes each generated $138,915.00 totaling $277,830.00 in September, which is a $13,595.00 increase on each or a total increase of $27,190.00 over the same period last year.
 
Year-to-date the total of the two taxes amounts to $2,611,252.00 which is $70,426.00 more than the same period in 2018.
 
10-28-19 10:37 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report for October 20th - 26th

 

Reports from October 20, 2019 through October 26, 2019 

 

 

 

October 20, 2019

Timothy Robertson, 32, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass and refusal to submit to arrest after officers responded to a call at a local residence.  He was also served an outstanding warrant.

John Hunter, 18, of Mena was charged with minor in possession of alcohol.  The arrest followed a call from a local man.

Crystal Glover, 27, of Prairie Grove was charged with theft of property after officers answered a call to a local retail store.

 

October 21, 2019

Garrett R. Bosley, 18, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after a call from employees at a local retail store.

A Mena woman reported that someone had broken a window at her residence.  Case is pending further information.

 

October 22, 2019

Joshua Fernandez, 33, of Mena was charged with theft by receiving after officers located the suspect regarding an outstanding warrant.

Report was made of a possible telephone scam by a local residence.  Case pending.

 

October 23, 2019

Hunter Hogan, 21, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct and refusal to submit to arrest after officers responded to a disturbance at a local residence.

Jonathan Higgins, 24, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant and was charged  with no vehicle tags and no insurance.

 

October 24, 2019

A 17-year-old Mena girl was charged with unauthorized use of a vehicle after officers received a call from a Mena woman.

Officers received a call regarding a possible scam from a local man.  Case is pending.

 

October 25 & 26 2019

Cheryl Fairless, 25, of Mena was charged with careless driving after a traffic stop.

Report was made of a possible shoplifter at a local store.  Case is pending.

 

10-28-19 10:12 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

Listen to the Mena - Polk County online Police and Fire radio scanner by clicking anywhere on this lie or on the police scanner below. Please listen responsibly

 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

Childhood obesity is a serious problem across the country. Surveys indicate 1 in 5 children are now obese.

 

Several studies have shown that students will eat more fruits and vegetables when they have easy access to a variety of high quality fresh items. And one way to provide more healthy options is through Farm-to-School programs.

 

October is National Farm-to-School Month. Farm-to-School programs connect Arkansas’s growers and local food producers to learning environments in the community.

 

The three main farm-to-school practices are local food procurement, nutrition education, and school gardens.

Students, farmers, and communities all win when they participate in this program.

 

Students win as they are provided access to nutritious, local food. Students also see educational opportunities such as school gardens, cooking lessons, and farm field trips.

 

Farmers win as the program can provide a significant financial opportunity as school purchasing dollars are re-directed to the local economy. 

 

And communities win as it provides opportunities to build family and community engagement. Buying from local producers and processors creates new jobs.

 

Top products for the farm to school sales in Arkansas are apples, watermelon, berries, sweet potatoes, and lettuce.

 

In the most recent legislative session, we sought to strengthen the program with Act 506. This legislation establishes a Farm to School and Early Childhood Education Program and creates a Farm to School and Early Childhood Education Program Coordinator Position within the Arkansas Agriculture Department to administer the program. This expansion will help to children to develop healthy eating habits even earlier.

 

In Arkansas, 47 school districts are using farm to school practices.  That's an impact on 95,605 students. But there are thousands more who could still benefit.

 

Making local food purchases do not require any extra paperwork on the part of the farmer or the school. The best way to get started is to find out who is interested in farm to school in your area. You can do so by visiting www.farmtoschool.org

 

10-25-19  4:15 p.m. KAWX.ORG

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review

October 25, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The state’s child welfare agency has improved its performance over the past three years and continues to make progress, according to its most recent annual report.

 

The Division of Children and Family Services recruits foster parents to care for children who have no families or whose families are not able to care for them.

 

The number of children in foster care has been going down, from 5,196 in late 2016 to 4,285 in August of this year.

 

More children are being placed with relatives. For example, in 2016 relatives took over the care of 21.3 percent of the children placed in the system. That number has increased to 30.3 percent.

 

Another good development is that fewer children are placed in institutional settings. Now, 86.9 percent are placed in a family setting, compared to 77.6 percent.

 

The division’s staff can respond and get children placed more quickly than before, because additional hirings have lowered the average caseload from 28 to 19. High caseloads are an important factor driving the relatively high turnover among employees. Any reduction in average caseloads will reduce the Division’s need to continue hiring and training new employees.

 

In August of 2016 the Division had 721 cases in which investigations of maltreatment of children were overdue. In August of this year, there were 104.

Three years ago, there was consensus among Division staff and elected officials that foster care in Arkansas had reached crisis levels.

The governor proposed and the legislature approved funding for more employees.

 

At the same time, private non-profit organizations and faith-based groups became involved and were given much credit for the significant increase in the number of foster families that have been recruited since 2016.

 

This year’s annual report is titled “Family First Fits Us,” to emphasize that the Division’s priority is to give every child the opportunity to grow up in a family, rather than in a group setting or in residential housing.

 

The ultimate goal of increasing staff and resources is not to simply reduce caseloads, but to keep children in their homes. Now that average caseloads have become more manageable for frontline workers, they are better able to provide intensive services to everyone in the family.

 

Those services include, for example, having someone from the Health Department visit the homes of newborn babies to give classes in parenting skills to the new mother and father.

 

Another example is sending a social worker from a faith-based organization to spend time with families that constantly argue, with the goal of teaching them to talk and listen to each other with respect. In successful cases, decision making becomes less chaotic and stressful.

 

In 2018, the Division’s family workers helped about 12,000 in their homes, to prevent neglect and abuse so as to prevent the children from ending up in foster care. During the same year about 7,800 were placed in foster care.

 

The Division’s leadership wants to continue expanding and improving services for children in their own homes. When successful, the services avoid trauma to children and disruption of families, while breaking cycles of abuse that can linger from generation to generation.

 

 

10-25-19  3:37 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: More Than Just a River

 
 
LITTLE ROCK – The Buffalo National River is 153 miles of Arkansas wilderness and great memories, and today I’d like to share some thoughts about why we must be diligent in protecting it.
 
The Buffalo was the first river in the United States to be designated a national river. That happened because so many Arkansans said we want it as a natural river without dams or obstructions.
 
Every year, thousands of adventurers brave the whitewater rapids in the upper reaches of the Buffalo or float the more placid waters downstream. Like so many others, my family and I have canoed down the river and hiked along the banks. I have observed Arkansas’s only elk herd in the woods near Ponca.
 
The wilderness that is the Buffalo is more than a clear-running river. The land tells much of our history. Three features of the Buffalo are on the National Register of Historic Places: The Big Buffalo Valley Historic District, the Buffalo River Bridge on Highway 7, and the Parker-Hickman Farm-Historic District.
 
The Arkansas Department of Heritage is assessing two other sites for possible nomination to the Register – the home sites of Granny Henderson and “Wild Vic” Flowers.
 
The very popularity of the Buffalo creates issues, such as litter that washes into the streams, and requires certain accommodations, such as public facilities. The National Park Service is working to improve its waste treatment, which is necessary for its restrooms along the river.
Some hazards aren’t as obvious or as easy to solve, such as aging municipal wastewater and septic systems, streambank erosion, and the sediment and nutrients that run into tributaries from unpaved roads.
 
We want to preserve this treasured resource. We want the families who have lived there for generations to have the resources to continue their good stewardship of this watershed and the river that runs through it.
 
As governor, I have a responsibility to protect the Buffalo River.  As an outdoorsman, I have a personal interest in preserving its health and beauty.
In 2016, I established the Beautiful Buffalo River Action Committee to address issues of concern in the Buffalo River Watershed. I asked the members of the committee to develop a non-regulatory, watershed-based management plan. In September, I took the next step by establishing the Buffalo River Conservation Committee, which will utilize the watershed management plan to prioritize and fund projects that would be supported by farmers and the local communities.
 
I was in law school when I discovered the Buffalo River, and like so many Arkansans, I value the Buffalo as a particularly beautiful part of God’s creation. Let’s work together to safeguard this jewel so that our children can share this natural masterpiece with their children and those who come after.
 
10-25-19 3:30 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 

Protecting Arkansas’s Hunting Culture 

 

Arkansas is home to outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy all the recreation opportunities afforded by “The Natural State.” Preserving the traditions of hunting and fishing is important to wildlife conservation and management and creates significant economic benefits. In order to ensure successful practices and support our sportsmen and women we must combat the growing threat of wildlife diseases.

 

In October, the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW) held a hearing examining the impacts of disease on wildlife conservation. One ailment that Arkansans are increasingly concerned about is chronic wasting disease (CWD).

 

CWD affects deer, elk and moose, causing the degeneration of the animal’s brain, loss of bodily control and death. There is no known treatment or cure for this disease. CWD has been detected in 26 states including Arkansas. As of mid-September, there have been 619 positive cases of CWD found in our state’s deer population. Since it was first detected in 2016, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) has taken action to prevent its spread by implementing innovative ways to address this problem.

 

For example, AGFC provided drop boxes so harvested deer and elk can be sent off and tested for CWD. Last deer season AGFC sampled and tested more than 7,500 deer and elk from across the state. Of those, 6,800 were harvested by hunters during the 2018-2019 hunting season. This season it plans to install at least one drop box in every county.

 

As states respond to CWD and execute plans to fight this disease, collaboration at all levels of government is necessary. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the primary federal national wildlife management agency, provides technical assistance and grant funding to support state efforts like those in Arkansas.

 

In addition to government agencies, private organizations also play a critical role. The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation (CSF) has been a long-time advocate in bringing attention to CWD and its devastating effect on the wildlife population and conservation efforts as well as the economic impact.

 

According to the CSF, the excise taxes on fishing, hunting and shooting equipment, in addition to license fees help support wildlife agencies and conservation programs, contributing nearly $3 billion a year. In Arkansas, these recreational sports support 25,000 jobs and account for more than $1 billion in economic activity.

 

CSF recently brought together state and federal policymakers, sportsmen’s conservation representatives and other interested parties to discuss CWD and what can be done to prevent the spread of this disease.

 

One recommendation is to develop reliable and consistent data about CWD. There is still a lot we don’t know about the disease and how it is transmitted. That’s why I support the Chronic Wasting Disease and Transmission in Cervidae Study Act. This legislation authorizes a special resource study to determine how chronic wasting disease spreads and can be prevented in deer and elk. The results should provide valuable information that will allow wildlife management professionals to craft and implement strategies to protect deer and elk herds from CWD.

 

I am committed to preserving and protecting our wildlife so we can keep the tradition of sport hunting alive for future generations.

 

 

10-25-19  3:24 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments October October 21st

 
All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Bobb Burton Huber, W/M, age 27, Count I: Probation Violation. The Original Offense was failure to comply with Sex and Child Offender Registration Act. Bond was set at $10,000.00.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Bobb B. Huber, W/M. age 27, Count I: Failure To Comply With Sex And Child Offender Registration and Reporting Requirements, a Class "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Michael Trivette, W/M, age 28, Count I: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Christina McCauley, W/F, age 42, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count III: Possession Of A Schedule IV Or V Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. 
 
10-25-19 6:28 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Oct. 23, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below that you would like current fishing information and reports for.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

10-23-19 6:05 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Quorum Court Meeting Held Tuesday, October 22nd

The Polk County Quorum Court met Tuesday, October 22nd, for their regular monthly session. All eleven Justices of the Peace were in attendance as well as other elected officials and visitors.

 

The JPs handled routine business, and also approved an ordinance to allow the county to pursue a grant to cover much of the costs associated with new cabling for the courthouse computer networks and phones. The current cabling is very outdated and not adequate for current needs.

 

Representatives from the Cherry Hill Cemetery were on hand with information about a grant they were seeking for a pavilion, storage shed and restroom for the cemetery. The Quorum Court passed a resolution authorizing the County Judge to apply for a grant on their behalf since. The non matching grant needed a municipal sponsor requiring the county to get involved since the cemetery is not located in a town. Lawrence Philpot, Nancy Philpot, and Kathy Rusert represented the cemetery and Kathy Rusert shared interesting historical information about the cemetery and the grant and proposed project. 

 

Judge Brandon Ellison reported that the county received $10,200.00 as their part of a class action lawsuit the county joined against drug companies. Ellison also reported that he is continuing to investigate options for the Quorum Court to consider concerning the very large cost increase for county employee's health insurance.

 

Heady Nezhadpour, a Medicare specialist, gave a presentation about Medicare and the benefits of it over traditional insurance for county employees and elected officials that are over the age of 65.

 

The Quorum Court also recognized County Judge Ellison for having recently been elected President of the County Judge's Association of Arkansas (CJAA). Click here for a related article. 

 

The next Quorum Court meeting will be November 26, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Quorum Court meetings are open to the public. 

 

10-23-19 1:01 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Judge Brandon Ellison Recognized By Quorum Court For Being Elected President of Judge's Association

The Polk County Quorum Court unanimously passed a resolution Tuesday sponsored by Justice of the Peace Harold Coogan recognizing the recent election of Polk County Judge Brandon Ellison for being elected President of the County Judge's Association of Arkansas by the other 74 county judges.

 
The Resolution reads:
 
A Resolution Acknowledging Honors
 
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE QUORUM COURT OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, STATE OF ARKANSAS, THE HONORABLE BRANDON ELLISON, POLK COUNTY JUDGE, BE RECOGNIZED FOR BEING NAMES PRESIDENT OF THE COUNTY JUDGE'S ASSOCIATION OF ARKANSAS
 
WHEREAS, the County Judge's Association of Arkansas (CJAA) convened in their Annual Fall meeting on September 23-25, 2019 in Benton, Arkansas, where officers for the upcoming term were elected; and
 
WHEREAS, the Honorable Brandon Ellison, Polk County Judge, was elected to serve as President of the CJAA; and
 
WHEREAS, the Polk County Quorum Court wished to recognize the Honorable Brandon Ellison for his leadership role as President in the CJAA and thank him for his service to the 75 Arkansas Counties.
 
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE QUORUM COURT OF POLK COUNTY, ARKANSAS, THE HONORABLE BRANDON ELLISON, POLK COUNTY JUDGE, IS TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR BEING ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE COUNTY JUDGE'S ASSOCIATION OF ARKANSAS. 
 
DATED THIS 22ND DAY OF OCTOBER, 2019.
The resolution was signed by the eleven Polk County Justices of the Peace, the Sheriff/Collector, County Clerk, Circuit Clerk, Assessor, Treasurer, District Judge, and Circuit Judge.
 
10-23-19 12:34 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Nab Larceny Suspect With Help Of US Secret Service For New Orleans Police Department

 

Mena Police Department News Release

 

"On Tuesday, October 22nd at about 1515 hours, the Mena Police Department arrested 33-year-old Joshua Fernandez on a warrant. At the time of the arrest, Joshua Fernandez was in possession of $46,321.00 dollars in cash.

With the assistance of the US Secret Service, and after contacting the New Orleans Police Department, we discovered that Joshua Fernandez was being sought by NOPD for Larceny. We learned that Joshua Fernandez had been involved in a burglary in New Orleans and a warrant had been requested. After receiving a copy of the NOPD offense report, a hold was placed on Joshua Fernandez. He is currently being held in the Polk County Jail pending extradition.

(All subjects should be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.)"

 

10-23-19 12:10 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Report for October 14th - 20th

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of October 14 – October 20, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


October 14, 2019
Report from complainant on Bunny Hop Lane near Yocana of the theft of a trailer, valued at $400.00.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 East near Mena of the fraudulent use of their credit card.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 280 near Vandervoort of an unauthorized person on their property.  Investigation continues.
Report from a business on Highway 71 North in Acorn of the attempted theft of a camper.  Investigation continues.
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Daniel J. Mendieta, 20, of Hot Springs, on Charges of Theft by Receiving and Possession of a Controlled Substance.


October 15, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Mena of the break-in to several storage units.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was James M. McEntire, 50, of Los Angeles, CA, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.
Arrested was Billie D. Taff, 22, of Watson, OK, on Warrants for Fleeing on Foot, Failure to Comply with Sex Offender Registry Requirements and a Scott County Warrant.


October 16, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 270 near Acorn of being harassed by an unknown person.
Report from complainant on Polk 48 near Potter of the theft of a vehicle.  The vehicle was located.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


October 17, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 21 near Cove of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from the Polk County Detention Center of a disturbance in the facility led to a Citation for Battery 3rd Degree being issued to Crystal L. Davis, 35, of Mena.


October 18, 2019
Report of a vehicle in the ditch on Polk 31 near Hatfield led to the arrest of Christina McCauley, 42, of Hatfield, on Charges of Possession of Meth/Cocaine, Possession of a Schedule IV/V Controlled Substance, Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
Report of missing cash led to a 17-year-old male being issued a Juvenile Citation for Theft of Property.  The juvenile was released to the custody of a parent/guardian.
Report from complainant on Polk 53 near Mena of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested was Michael E. Trivette, 28, of Mena, on a Charge of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
Arrested by an officer with Arkansas Probation/Parole was Bobby B. Huber, 27, of Mena, on Warrants for Failure to Comply with Sex Offender Registration Requirements and Probation Violation.
Arrested was Veronica M. Maddox, 22, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.


October 19, 2019
Report from complainant on College Drive in Mena of the theft of $900.00 cash.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was David P. Schmidt, 54, of Mena, on four Warrants for Failure to Appear.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was Donavan T. Hunt, 28, of Mena, on a Parole Hold.


October 20, 2019
Report from neighbors on Polk 36 near Hatfield of issues regarding property lines.  Investigation continues.
Request for assistance on Polk 195 near Ink.  Deputy responded.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked two vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 28 Incarcerated Inmates , with 12 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00744

 

10-22-19 12:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Quorum Court Meets Tuesday, October 22nd

The Polk County Quorum Court meets for their regular monthly meeting Tuesday, October 22nd. The meeting will take place in the Quorum Court Meeting Room of the Polk County Office Complex (old hospital) on Pine Street in Mena. The 6:00 p.m. meeting is open to the public and there is a Public Comment time provided as well as printed copies of the agenda.

 

On the October meeting agenda, in addition to routine business and reports, is a resolution for submission of a grant application for new cabling at the courthouse, and a resolution authorizing the County Judge to apply for a grant on behalf od the Cherry Hill Cemetery.

 

Also there will be a presentation by Medicare Specialist Mr. Heady Nezhadpour.

 

Quorum Court meetings are held monthly on the fourth Tuesday of the month at 6:00 p.m.

 

10-21-19 5:44 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments October 15th and 16th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Chad A. Aucoin, W/M, age 35, Count I: Delivery of Methamphetamine or Cocaine, a Class  "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Chad Aucoin, W/M. age 35, Count I: Delivery of Methamphetamine or Cocaine, a Class "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Daniel Johnathan Mendieta, W/M, age 20, Count I: Theft By Receiving, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of A Schedule IV or V Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count III: Possession Of A Schedule III Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Stephanie Abbott, W/F, age 39, Count I: Possession Of Methamphetamine With The Purpose To Deliver, a Class "B" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Billie D. Taff, W/F, age 22, Count I: Failure To Comply With Sex And Child Offender Registration And Reporting Requirements, a Class "C" Felony. 
 
10-21-19 2:04 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report for October 13th - 19th

 

 

Mena Police Reports from October 13, 2019 through October 19, 2019

 

October 13, 2019

Officers travelled to Sebastian County and brought Charles D. Miner, 36 of Pine Bluff back to Polk County on an outstanding warrant.

 

October 14, 2019

Chad Aucoin, 35, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant.

Gerald Aleshire, 22, of Mena was arrested on two outstanding warrants.

 

October 15, 2019

A Mena woman reported the theft of two bicycles from her yard.  Case is pending further investigation.

Stephanie Abbott, 38, of Mena was charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver and possession of drug paraphernalia.  She was additionally served an outstanding warrant.  The arrest followed a call to a local residence.

Justin Cole, 29, of Mena was served three outstanding warrants.

 

October 16, 2019

Officers responded to a call at a local residence regarding a dog running at large.  Case is pending.

 

October 17, 2019

Rachel M. Tarkington-Wolf, 22, of Mena was charged with shoplifting and criminal trespass after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.

Mikel Thomas, 29, of Mena was taken into custody on an outstanding warrant.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.

 

October 18, 2019

Officers responded to a report of a vehicle in a ditch.  Case is pending location of driver.

 

October 19, 2019

Dennis Stinson, 41, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after a call to an apartment building.

June McMillan, 34, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance and expired tags. She was also served four outstanding warrants.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.

 

10-21-19 1:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

On average, an Arkansan with a bachelor’s degree will earn $700,000 more in a 30 year career than those who drop out of college.  The gap climbs to $1.5 million for those with a doctorate.

 

This information is included in the 2018 Economic Security Report which was presented this week to the Arkansas Legislative Council Higher Education Sub-Committee.

 

The report makes clear that the cost to obtain any certificates or degrees at an Arkansas public postsecondary institution is significantly lower than the hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in additional average career earnings. 

 

Not including living expenses, the estimated cost in Arkansas for an associate’s degree is $10,000. The estimated cost for a bachelor’s degree $30,000.

 

Each level of educational achievement provides a boost in earnings power. In fact, the report shows a significant difference in earnings just the first year. On average, first year earnings for Arkansans with a bachelor’s degree are $31,800. Average first year earnings for high school graduates are $11,900.

 

Employment rates are also impacted by levels of education. First year full-time employment rates for college dropouts is 29%. The rates climb to 44% for Arkansans with a Certificate of Proficiency and 58% for those with an associate’s degree.

 

In most cases, what you study matters more than where you study. For those with an associate’s degree, science technology and health professionals make the most in average first year earnings. For those with bachelor’s degrees, engineering students make the most in average first year earnings.

 

Studies of health professions are the most popular over all degree areas in Arkansas as well as being the most popular choice for Certificates of Proficiency, Technical Certificates, and First Professional degrees. The most common Bachelor’s degree programs are in Business, Management, and Marketing.

 

Although each graduate’s success will reflect a variety of factors such as the local job market, where they choose to live, and what area they chose to study, the Economic Report provides valuable information as students and parents consider education and career choices. We have posted the report on our website www.arkansashouse.org

 

10-18-19 4:25 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Making Real Progress in Foster Care

 
Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Address: Making Real Progress in Foster Care
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – When I took office in 2015, our child-welfare and foster-care system was in urgent need of improvement, and today I’d like to discuss the tremendous progress we’ve made on behalf of the children of Arkansas.
 
In my first spring as governor, I ordered a review of the child-welfare and foster-care system.
 
As I said when Paul Vincent released his report, it was a heart-rending judgment on our shortcomings. I was especially alarmed to learn that caseworkers sometimes had to choose between taking children to their own homes, leaving the children at a division office, or pleading with foster parents to make room for one more child.
 
The just-released annual report from the Division of Children and Family Services shows we have made real progress.
 
Under the leadership of Director Mischa Martin, the division has reduced the number of children in foster care from more than 5,200 to 4,400 in August. That is a 21 percent decrease since 2016.
 
We have reduced the caseload for each childcare worker from a statewide average of 28 cases down to 20 and even fewer in some areas of the state.
We have reduced the number of overdue investigations from a high of more than 721 to 82 at the end of July.
 
We have significantly reduced the number of children 10 and younger in residential care.
 
We are placing more than 80 percent of children in family-like settings. The number of children we are placing in family-like settings has exceeded the goal of 85 percent.
 
We are placing 30 percent of all children with relatives, nearly reaching the goal of 33 percent. That is up from 23 percent in August 2016. The division increased the percentage of children placed in family-like settings from 78 percent to 87 percent.
 
Teresa Bunche, an employee of the division since July 2002, has been on the frontlines as an investigator. When the division receives a complaint, an investigator is the first to visit a family to investigate and assess a complaint.
 
She has seen the improvement firsthand. In years past, she was handling as many as 85 foster children at a time. She often worked nonstop. The division was short-staffed, which increased the workload on others and led to increased staff turnover.
 
But the division hired more people, changed some policies, and the workload is manageable. When Teresa was promoted to a supervisor’s position in September, her caseload was down to 15.
 
We have moved from the crisis that Director Martin inherited when she took the job in 2016 to restoring hope and creating a bright future for our children at risk. I am proud of the Division of Child and Family Services for this work. I thank all of the employees for their work and our private sector faith-based partners as well. We are making real progress.
 
10-18-19 4:20 p.m. KAWX.ORG
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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 

Renewing our Focus on Personal and Public Cybersecurity

 

We are a technology-dependent society. Sensitive personal data such as financial accounts, Social Security numbers and medical information are secured in cyberspace. Unfortunately, this information that we trust to be protected, is targeted by high-tech criminals working to steal our private information, damage networks of data and prevent users from accessing material stored on secure systems.

 

CNN recently reported that 140 local governments, police stations and hospitals have been held hostage by ransomware attacks in the past 10 months. According to the FBI, ransomware is the fastest growing malware threat. These attacks target a computer or network and infect the system, preventing access to the data until the victim pays money to regain use of their files.

 

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. This is a time we can refocus and bring attention to protecting our personal digital information, improving security awareness practices in the workplace and preserving our national security.

 

We all have a stake in safeguarding this sensitive information. I have seen the commitment of Arkansans to support cybersecurity efforts at all levels of government, in our homes and private businesses.

 

Leaders from across the state recently participated in the American Cyber Alliance’s 2nd annual Arkansas Cyber Summit. This event brought together cybersecurity leaders to provide an opportunity to emphasize better collaboration across the state, local and federal government and private sector and to ensure we are building a workforce that is cyber literate. It’s clear there is a commitment to creating a more secure Arkansas. I’m pleased to see the ongoing actions and education to learn the latest best practices, current threats and new technologies.

 

With the strides that Arkansas is making in its K-12 schools to better educate students on cyber hygiene and basic cybersecurity practices, we are raising our state’s technology aptitude, which will likely result in better cybersecurity.

 

The Little Rock Air Force Base is playing an important role in the development of cyber capabilities to help the U.S. Air Force after leaders, including myself, helped procure a cybersecurity mission to train more cyber warriors. In 2017 the Air National Guard Cyber Skills Validation Course graduated its inaugural class of students, and this year the unit doing this work was officially designated as the 223rd Cyberspace Operations Squadron.

 

The development of cyber programs in Arkansas extends beyond our military installations. The University of Central Arkansas also launched its cyber range to educate students to identify potential cyberattacks and stop them before they begin.

 

Arkansas is also working hard to create cross-functional teams to improve our collective ability to share cyber threat intelligence so that our critical infrastructure owners and businesses can be fortified from potential attacks. I have been pleased with the growing interest from the intelligence community in what we are doing in Arkansas.

 

As public-private partnerships develop and implement critical cyber protections, there is a role for each of us to play. As a consumer, I’m focusing – like all Americans should – on protecting my personal data because we all have an interest in keeping our electronic information safe.

 

10-18-19   2:22 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

October 18, 2019 

 

LITTLE ROCK – Earlier this month the state Crime Lab opened a new facility in Lowell, in northwest Arkansas. 

The opening will speed forensic testing and chemical analysis for law enforcement agencies in the region. It also will relieve pressure on the backlog of cases in the main Crime Lab in Little Rock and the Regional Laboratory in Hope.

 

Also this month, the Legislative Council’s Personnel Subcommittee approved the Crime Lab’s request to make the salary of the state chief Medical Examiner more competitive. It will be $270,455 a year. The position has been vacant since July.

 

The medical examiner oversees the section in the Crime Lab that performs autopsies. More than 1,500 autopsies a year are referred to the section. They are cases of sudden and unexpected deaths, caused by trauma and natural diseases. They include criminal cases, industrial accidents and motor vehicle accidents.

 

For comparison, Memphis also has an opening for a chief medical examiner and is paying a salary of about $300,000 a year, the Crime Lab’s director told the Personnel Committee.

 

The director told legislators that the Crime Lab has not yet received any applications for the vacant position. The previously posted salary had been a range, from $175,620 to $270,455.

 

Another job opening in the medical examiner’s section has been vacant for more than a year and a half, the director said. Other states have difficulty filling the positions because there are so few board-certified forensic pathologists in the country. The director estimated the total to be about 400.

 

The Crime Lab also has a DNA section, whose duty is to analyze and organize evidence from crime scenes. Staff also testify in court.

 

A related section collects and organizes DNA samples from convicted offenders, unsolved cases, missing persons and unidentified bodies. The data is shared nationwide to assist criminal investigations.

 

The use of DNA samples in criminal investigations began with the passage of legislation in 1997, but it was limited to the collection of blood samples from criminals convicted of sexual and violent offenses.

 

In 2001, burglary was made a crime that allowed law enforcement to collect DNA from a convicted offender. Act 1470 of 2003 made Arkansas an all-felony state, meaning samples were collected from every person convicted of any felony.

 

Act 543 of 2015 expanded the law to allow for the collection of a DNA sample on all felony arrests.

 

The Crime Lab has a section that is familiar to anyone who watches police shows on TV, or who reads murder mysteries. It is under the Firearms and Toolmarks examiner. Its main duty is to compare ammunition with firearms, for example, to determine what type of gun fired a bullet recovered from a crime scene.

 

The Forensic Toxicology section identifies illegal drugs, and determines whether they are a factor in suspicious deaths.

 

The Crime Lab has staff who take fingerprints, palm prints and foot prints. The same section identifies tire tracks and the tracks left by various types of shoes. Part of the sections duties is to enter prints into a computer-based system, where investigators can search for and compare prints compiled throughout the country.

 

10-18-19   2:15 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Acorn Mighty Oaks 4H Pancake Breakfast

The Acorn Mighty Oaks 4H Club Pancake Breakfast fundrasier will be Saturday, October 19th from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. in the Farm Bureau Room which is at 309 South Morrow Street in Mena. Delivery is available for orders of fice or more. 

 

 

10-17-19 6:13 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Ink Fire Department Fundraiser Saturday

 

The Ink Fire Department will have a fundraiser in Mena on Saturday, October 19th from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. in front of the Edward Jones office in the Northside Shopping Center. 

 

Proceeds from the fundraiser will be used for the new Ink Fire Station.

 

Volunteers will be selling cheeseburgers or pulled pork baskets, which will come with chips and a drink, for $8.00. 

 

 

10-17-19 6:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Hot Dog Fundraiser To Benefit Special Olympics Saturday At Atwood's

 

The Mena Area Board of Realtors will host a Hot Dog Fundraiser in Mena on Saturday, October 19th from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at Atwood's. 

 

Proceeds will benefit Special Olympics Arkansas.

 

Two hot dogs and a soda for just $1.00.

 

10-17-19 5:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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President Orders Flags To Half Staff In Honor Of Elijah E. Cummings

 
Presidential Proclamation on the Death of Elijah E. Cummings
 
As a mark of respect for the memory and longstanding public service of Representative Elijah E. Cummings, of Maryland, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions through October 18, 2019.  I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same period at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.
 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth.
 
DONALD J. TRUMP
 
Arkansas Flags To Be Flown At Half Staff 
 
By order of a Presidential Proclamation, the United States flag and the state flag of Arkansas are immediately lowered to half-staff in memory of Representative Elijah E. Cummings, of Maryland. Flags are to remain at half-staff through Friday, October 18, 2019.
 
10-17-19 1:36 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Portion of Race Track Road in Mena Closed All Day Monday, October 21st

Race Track Road from Autumn Drive (Senior Center) to Timber Ridge East will be closed all day on Monday, October 21, 2019 for street repairs. 

 

Residents living in that area should make plans for an alternate route.

 

The closure will start around 7:00 a.m. and will be re-opened around 3:00 p.m. according to City Hall. 

 

The Senior Citizens center will be accessible, the closure will start just past the entrance. 

 

 

10-16-19 5:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Take Back Vapes and Prescription Drugs at Statewide Event

There is a permanent collection site in Mena at the Polk County Court House-Sheriff's Department located at 507 Church Street.

ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Take Back Vapes and Prescription Drugs at Statewide Event

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas’s 18th Prescription Drug Take Back Day is scheduled for October 26 at various locations throughout the State. Arkansans are prescribed opioids at a rate of 62 pills per every man, woman and child in the State. With such an influx of pills, half of Arkansas teens report it is easy to obtain prescription drugs from their parents’ or grandparents’ medicine cabinets. New this year, e-cigarette devices and vape pens will be accepted. This statewide event has a goal to collect 30,000 pounds to emphasize the importance for Arkansans to safely dispose of old and unused prescription medications and e-cigarette devices while ensuring these drugs stay out of the hands of addicted Arkansans.

 

“We lose too many Arkansans to opioid addiction and too many teens are addicted to vaping,” said Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge.

 

“Working with law enforcement officials, Arkansans can safely clear out old medications and trash dangerous vape products their kids are using.”

 

Rutledge released the following list of medications that will be accepted at these events across Arkansas:

 

  • Opioids, such as OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, etc.
  • E-cigarette and vaping devices
  • Stimulants, such as Adderall, Ritalin, Concerta, Dexedrine, etc.
  • Depressants, such as Ativan, Xanax, Valium, etc.
  • Other prescription medications
  • Over-the-counter medicines
  • Vitamins
  • Pet medicines
  • Medicated ointments and lotions
  • Inhalers
  • Liquid medicines in glass or leak-proof containers (up to 12 ounces)
  • Medicine samples

Medications may be returned in the original bottle or in any other container for increased privacy.

 

Prescription Drug Take Back locations will be available 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 26. The National Prescription Drug Take Back Days are held twice a year, but to find event sites and year-round drop-off locations near you, visit ARTakeBack.org.

 

Properly destroying these medications also protects the environment. Medicines that are flushed or poured down the drain can end up polluting waters, which could contaminate food and water supplies. Wastewater treatment plants or septic systems may not remove many medicine compounds. Turning over these medications at Take Back Day events also reduces the risk of accidental poisonings by children, seniors or pets, as well as the danger of drug abuse.

 

For more information and other consumer-related issues, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office at (800) 482-8982, email consumer@arkansasag.gov or visit ArkansasAG.gov.

 

10-16-19 1:10 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Oct. 16, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below for current fishing information from that area.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

10-16-19 12:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Weekend Activities At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

 

For information about any of the activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena this weekend, dial (479) 394-2863 or visit the park's website by clicking here.

 

Friday, October 18th

 

Fall Foliage Walk  starting at 11:15 am and lasting anout 1 hour. Meet on the  north side of Lovers’ Leap. Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take an easy stroll to the Lovers' Leap observation deck and observer the fall foliage along the way.

 

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Touch Table starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet in the Hearth Room. There will be different things that you can see and touch. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun, interactive way of exploring things found in our park, and find out what they are.

 

 

Slithering Snakes starting at 7:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. What type of snake slither over the forest floor at Queen Wilhelmina? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to learn a few of the venomous and non-venomous snakes we have here at Queen Wilhelmina.

 

Saturday, October 19th

 

Trailer Rides from 4:00 pm until 7:00 pm lasting about 1 hour each ride. Meet at the Amphitheater. Rides will start every hour on the hour. After the trail ride join us by the fire for storytelling, hot chocolate and marshmallow roast! Space is limited 15 people per ride. Please call ahead and reserve your spot today! Amphitheater is located right beside the Wonder House Admission $6 Adults (15 and older) $4 Kids (4-14) Kids Free (3- under). Must purchase trailer ride tickets at the Lodge. 

 

Sunday, October 20th

 

Reservoir Hike starting at 8:30 am  and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet at the Reservoir Trailhead. Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a hike to what used to be the old water system for the 1898 hotel.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 10:30 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

 

Ouachita Walk starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet on the west side of the Ouachita Trailhead. Join Park Interpreter Melissa and enjoy a serene fall walk on top of the mountain to catch a glimpse of the changes the season brings with it. This will be an easy hike for all ages.

 

10-15-19 8:45 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Drop Off Location Established In Mena For Chronic Wasting Disease Testing

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission offers many avenues for hunters to have deer or elk tested. All elk harvested in Arkansas must be submitted for a Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) test. Submitting samples for CWD from deer is voluntary; however, it is strongly recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, when hunting in areas where CWD is known to be present, before eating the meat. 

 

Drop your deer at one of the locations below to have it tested for CWD.

 

The Mena location is at the ARDOT Maintenance Headquarters (State Highway Department) 2684 Highway 71 North. 


For additional information dial 877-525-8606 or click here.

 

10-14-19 8:12 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Log October 7 - 13

 

Sherrif's Log

 

The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of October 7 – October 13, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


October 7, 2019
Arrested by an officer with the Arkansas Game & Fish was Joshua R. Neer, 34, of Hatfield, on two Warrants for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.


October 8, 2019
No reports were filed.


October 9, 2019
Discovery of an illegal substance led to a 14-year-old male being issued Juvenile Citations for Possession of a Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.  The juvenile was released to the custody of a parent/guardian.
Report from complainant on Polk 93 near Rocky of an unauthorized person on their property led to a Citation for Criminal Mischief being issued to Tracy Norwood.


October 10, 2019
Traffic stop on Polk 37 near Potter led to the arrest of Brenda Watson, 53, of Mena, on a Dallas County, Texas Warrant.  Additional information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Polk 302 near Cherry Hill of the theft of a mailbox.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 375 West near Shady Grove of the break-in and vandalism done to a residence, causing $1,275.00 in damages.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 375 West near Mena of damage done to a vehicle window.  Deputy responded.
Arrested was Michael R. Elmore, 35, of Gillham, on Charges of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License, No Vehicle License, No Proof of Insurance, Obstructing Governmental Operations and a Sevier County Warrant.
Arrested was Jennifer A. M. Emfinger, 34, of Mena, on a Warrant for Felony Failure to Appear.


October 11, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 136 near Cove of items missing from a rental property.  Deputy responded.
Arrested was David H. Horton, 33, of Mena, on a Charge of Possessing an Instrument of Crime.


October 12, 2019
Report from a business on Highway 71 South in Hatfield of vandalism done to a sign.  The suspects were located, and then made repairs to the sign.
Report of a disturbance on West Boundary Road near Mena.  Deputies responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


October 13, 2019
Request for assistance for a hiker on the Athens Big Fork Trail.  Officers from the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission and the U.S. Forest Service responded.
Request for welfare check on Highway 8 West near Rocky.  Deputy responded.
Arrested was Nathaniel A. Riley, 36, of Mena, on a Charge of Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License.


Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked three vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 29 Incarcerated Inmates , with 11 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

PC19-00726

 

10-14-19 4:15 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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September Lottery Sales Report

Retail sales of Arkansas lottery tickets for September 2019  totaled $37,886,774.00 statewide.

 
The highest sales were in Pulaski County and totaled $7,008,186.50.
 
The lowest sales were in Montgomery County and totaled $30,759.00.
 
In Polk County, $146,840.00 was spent on lottery tickets in September.
 
According to Arkansas Family Council, only about eighteen cents of every dollar spent on lottery tickets goes to scholarships, the intended purpose of the lottery in Arkansas. 
 
10-14-19 1:13 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report October 6th - 12th

Reports from October 6, 2019 through October 12, 2019 

 

October 6, 2019

Christopher Sanders, 31, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant.

Christopher Brown, 35, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct and public intoxication.  The arrest followed an incident at a local laundromat.

 

October 7 & 8, 2019

Harry Laird, 59, of Oden was charged with possession of methamphetamine or cocaine with intent to deliver and theft of property.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.

A Mena man reported that he had lost a gun.  It was entered as missing into the National Crime Information Center.

 

October 9 & 10, 2019

Employees at a local retail store reported that someone had shoplifted several items.  Case pends further review of surveillance tapes and identification and identity of the suspect.

Report was made of a possible child abuse case.  Case has been turned over to other authorities.

 

October 11, 2019

Report was made of someone breaking into a self-storage facility.  Case pends further information.

A local woman reported that she is being harassed by a neighbor.   No charges filed.

 

October 12, 2019

Corwin Anderson, 35, of Mena was charged with DWI (drugs) and careless driving.  The arrest followed an accident.

Curtis Parnell, 35, of Mena was charged with shoplifting.  The arrest followed a call to a local department store.

 

10-14-19 11:27 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Forest Service Reminds Hunters To Put Safety First During Hunting Season

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. — Forest Service managers are reminding hunters to be safe and follow State and Federal law as hunting season begins on the Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

 

Before embarking on a hunting trip, hunters should inform others of their hunting locations, and when they will be returning. It is also important to and check weather forecasts.

 

All state wildlife regulations are in effect on national forests in Arkansas and Oklahoma.  State and federal law enforcement officers work with forest officials to reinforce rules relating to issues that occur year after year.  These illegal activities include:

 

Baiting game species on the national forests

 

Shooting from or across a county, state or federally maintained road

 

Possessing or consuming alcohol during any hunting activity or while operating a motorized vehicle, including off-highway vehicles.

 

Traveling off designated routes for motorized vehicle use

 

Additionally, campsites may be in place for up to 30 days as long as they are occupied.  At the end of the 30-day period, campsites must be completely dismantled and moved at least 1 mile from the original campsite. The 30-day period begins the first day any item is placed at the campsite.  Campers may camp up to 90 days in a calendar year.  Campsites may not be reserved.

 

Hunters should also be aware of additional legal requirements that apply specifically to the individual national forest or wildlife management areas on the forest.

 

Ouachita National Forest (Arkansas and Oklahoma)

 

Hunting stands may be erected for up to 14 days at a time and must be moved to another location more than 200 yards away if the hunting trip continues.  All stands must have the owner’s name and address permanently affixed.  Remove stands from the forest at the end of the hunting season.

 

Motor Vehicle Use Maps are available which show all designated routes for motorized travel.  OHVs are allowed on designated routes only or in game retrieval corridors while retrieving legally downed large game.  Be aware that not all Forest Service roads are designated as routes.  OHV operators may pick up a free map at the nearest Ouachita National Forest office or print one from the website (www.fs.usda.gov/ouachita) to ensure they are riding legally and are aware of game retrieval rules. 

 

Oklahoma forest visitors should remember that riders ages 18 and under must wear a safety helmet while operating an OHV, and only one person at a time may ride an OHV, unless the vehicle is specifically designed for two riders.

 

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests (Arkansas)

 

OHVs are allowed on designated routes only.  Be aware that not all Forest Service roads are designated as routes.  OHV operators may pick up a free map at the nearest Ozark-St. Francis National Forest office or print one from the website (www.fs.usda.gov/osfnf) to ensure they are riding legally. 

 

Remove hunting stands from the forest at the end of the hunting season.

 

For more information on hunting the Ouachita or the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests, consult hunting regulations published by the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission or the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.  Call the Ouachita National Forest at (501) 321-5202 or the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests at (479) 964-7200 to learn the location of the office nearest you.

 

The Mena District Ranger's office phone number s (479) 394-2382.

 

10-14-19 11:16 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Arkansas Timber is a Crop Too

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Arkansas Timber is a Crop Too
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas’s timber industry contributes $6.4 billion to our economy, and today I’d like to talk about the many benefits of the forests to our state and also the effect of the ongoing trade war.
 
Agriculture is Arkansas’s number one industry.  It is easy to forget that the timber industry is part of that. But timber production is a crop just like rice or soybeans or cotton. The people who raise trees are tree farmers. Like other crops, timber is at the mercy of natural disasters such as fire, flood, drought, and insect infestations.
 
The money that the timber industry brings in to Arkansas is a third of agriculture’s $20 billion in income. The timber industry employs 28,000 people directly, and provides more than 60,000 other jobs indirectly through equipment sales and maintenance, fuel suppliers, diesel mechanics, and mill supply stores, to name a few.
 
The people who haul logs need hard hats, boots, chain saws, and trucks, and those trucks need diesel fuel, tires, and maintenance.
 
And there are many other reasons our forests are important to our state. Trees minimize erosion and scrub the air of certain pollutants. Trees beautify the landscape. Tens of thousands of people – Arkansans and outdoor lovers from around the world – hike, bike, camp, and fish in our forests. In the autumn, tourists flock to northwest Arkansas to see our trees turn color, which is a symphony for the eyes.
 
The list of the variety of trees we grow is long. The primary species of pine are loblolly and shortleaf.  We also grow slash pine. Other softwoods include cypress, cedar, and eastern red cedar.
 
We grow 160 species of hardwoods, including red and white oak, hickory, sweet gum, white and green ash, hackberry, and west of the Mississippi River at Crowley’s Ridge, yellow poplar.
 
Timber is a renewable resource, and through smart stewardship, Arkansas is planting 1.6 trees for every tree that is harvested. We sell wood for paper, pellets for fuel, pallets, poles, plywood, crossties, furniture, flooring, barrel staves, and construction.
 
We can attribute much of the success of our timber industry to good management practices, which include a robust program for prescribed burns. Prescribed burning, which burns up the fuel on the forest floor, is the best defense against wildfires.
 
Just like the rest of our agricultural products, we depend upon exports. Until recently, China was our biggest timber market, but with the trade war, exports of U.S. timber to China have fallen by 40 percent. The Chinese government has imposed retaliatory tariffs of up to 25 percent on imports of U.S. lumber and other wood products.
 
It is also important to pass the U.S. Mexico-Canada trade agreement, or new NAFTA, to assure fairness for our timber industry in North American trade.
 
I am confident the tariff dispute will end.  But I also am confident that regardless of how long it lasts or what our trade looks like when it’s over, Arkansas’s timber industry will emerge stronger than ever. Our farmers, like the trees they grow, are a hardy bunch.
 
10-11-19 5:48 p.m. KAWX.ORG
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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Responding to the Opioid Crisis on Multiple Fronts

 

Dak Kees, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Arkansas, recently brought federal charges against a Texarkana doctor after an investigation uncovered that he prescribed over 1.2 million dosages of opioids to over 15,000 patients over a two-year period.

 

These are shocking numbers. But then again, every number related to the opioid epidemic is alarming.

 

According to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 130 Americans die every day from opioid overdoses. The opioid crisis claimed the lives of 47,000 Americans in 2017.

 

The impact of this national epidemic has been felt acutely in the Natural State. CDC data showed we had the second-highest prescribing rate over recent years—enough for each Arkansan to have more than one opioid prescription in his or her name. It has taken a conscious effort by the medical community to drive those numbers down from approximately 250,000 opioid prescriptions per month in 2014 to nearly 220,000 opioid prescriptions per month in the later portions of 2018—a 12 percent decrease over a four-year period. Rogue actors writing illegal opioid prescriptions cannot be allowed to set back the progress that Arkansas’s medical professionals have made to responsibly reduce that number.

 

That’s why the announcement of these charges is so important. We cannot stem the tide unless we enforce accountability among prescribers.

 

At the press conference announcing the charges, Kees said "I hope this is a wake-up call. And trust me when I say, there will be many more wake-up calls to come." Both Kees and Cody Hiland, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas, have been empowered to hold suspected over-prescribers responsible. This move sends a clear message as to their intention to crack down on this behavior in order to end the plague of opioid addiction in Arkansas.

 

Ensuring illicit opioids do not continue to flood our communities and state without consequence is an important part of our overall strategy. Congress has responded to the crisis with a variety of solutions aimed at promoting a comprehensive approach to reverse the trend.

 

The latest opioid-related law tackles this public health emergency with a multi-faceted, far-reaching approach. From the enforcement side, the law enhances efforts to combat illegal drugs at the border and includes additional measures to crack down on the shipment of synthetic opioids. It aims to drive innovative and long-term solutions that will spur the development of new non-addictive painkillers and ensure parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits. On the treatment end, the law increases family-focused care and encourages recovery by supporting states’ efforts to address substance use disorders by increasing access to medication-assisted treatment, health professionals, long-distance care and recovery housing services.

 

The treatment and recovery aspect of our strategy is key. Federal resources are being deployed nationwide to break the cycle of addiction. These grants are invaluable for facilities that give addicts and their families new hope in the fight against opioid abuse. We have a responsibility to ensure that these investments are delivering the intended results. The good news, from what I have seen firsthand at treatment facilities in Arkansas, is these efforts are indeed helping.

 

The opioid crisis has had a widespread and destructive effect on the Natural State. Many good people are working hard to end it. I am committed to supporting their efforts to attain that goal.

 

10-11-19 5:14 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

A 2017 study titled “Indicators of School Crime and Safety,” published by the United States Department of Justice and the United States Department of Education, reported that 20% of students ages 12-18 reported being bullied at school during the previous school year.

 

The same study also reported that about 33% of students who reported being bullied at school indicated that they were bullied at least once or twice a month during the school year.

 

The persistence of school bullying has led to instances of student suicide across the country, including Arkansas.

 

October is National Bullying Prevention Month. Bullying is when someone hurts or scares another person repeatedly. It can include name calling, inflicting physical pain, exclusion, public humiliation, hurtful pranks and defacing property.

 

The Arkansas legislature began passing anti-bullying legislation in 2003. This year we strengthened those laws in an effort to reduce the instances of bullying in our schools.

 

In 2019, the General Assembly passed Act 1029, an Act to Amend the State Anti-Bullying Policy.

 

It requires parents of the victim of bullying to be notified as soon as reasonably practicable. It requires schools to investigate and write a report on the complaint within 5 school days. The act also requires the school to notify the parent or legal guardian of the student who is determined to have been the perpetrator of the incident of bullying.

 

In addition, it requires the superintendent to annually update the school board on the number of incidents of bullying reported and the actions taken.

 

Act 1029 states the Department of Education shall require 2 hours of professional development for licensed public school personnel in bullying prevention and recognition of the relationship between incidents of bullying and the risk of suicide.

 

This General Assembly also passed Act 190 which requires school counselors to spend at least 90% of his or her working time providing direct and indirect services to students.

 

The legislature will continue to study the issue of bullying but there are things we can all do.

 

Help children understand bullying. Talk about what bullying is and how to stand up to it safely. Tell kids bullying is unacceptable. Make sure they know how to get help.

 

And finally we can all model how to treat others with kindness and respect.

 

10-11-19 5:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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RED RIBBON WEEK GRANT AWARDED TO HOLLY HARSHMAN ELEMENTARY

ARKANSAS SHERIFF’S ASSOCIATION AWARDS RED RIBBON WEEK SUPPORT GRANT TO HOLLY HARSHMAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

Sheriff Scott Sawyer and Mena School Resource Officer, Justin Wagner presented Holly Harshman Elementary School with the Arkansas Sheriff Association award grant of $2,000. The monies will be used to purchase incentive prizes and rewards for HHE’s positive behavior system “Bearcat Eyes Are Watching You” monthly pep assemblies and the 2019 Red Ribbon Week (RRW) activities during October 28th-November 1, 2019.

 

 

HHE will be joining the nation’s unified initiative supporting the 2019 Red Ribbon Week theme “Send A Message; Stay Drug Free!” HHE School Counselor, Vicky Maye and Behavioral Interventionist, Ashlyn Watts have worked together in the application of the grant with the mission to share the importance of recognizing October for “Saying No to Drugs and Bullying!” We are hoping to broadcast a very important message that creates a tipping point to change behavior and create a symbol of intolerance toward the use of drugs and bullying that will last all the year through. Maye and Watts are excited about the rewards and prizes that the ASA grant monies have helped provide for our HHE staff and students.

 

10-11-19 11:51 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

October 11, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The annual report cards for Arkansas public schools has been released by the state Education Department, and they show improvement over last year.

 

More schools earned an A grade and fewer schools were labeled with an F. The number of schools getting an A went up by 11 percent, and the number of schools getting an F went down by 14 percent.

 

The grades are based on test scores, changes in test scores from one year to the next, graduation rates and other factors that indicate students’ academic success.

 

The report cards can be found on the Department’s web site. An Internet search for Arkansas and “myschoolinfo” will bring up the main page. Then you can search for individual schools and school districts.

 

A report card provides a letter grade and a demographic analysis of the students. For example, once you find a school and click on the button that says “Statistics,” you will get information such as the percentage of students who are in special education classes and who live in low income families.

The page lists the average years of experience of the teaching staff, and the average pupil to teacher ratio in all the classrooms.

 

This year, the report cards were released earlier than in past years in order to give educators time to identify problem areas and adjust their teaching strategies accordingly.

 

The school report cards are part of the 2019 federal and state accountability reports. They indicate that 557 schools improved test scores, and 505 schools improved weighted achievement scores. For the third consecutive year, students’ graduation rates improved.

 

In 2017 the legislature enacted wholesale reforms in the accountability system for Arkansas schools. Although still very reliant on standardized test scores, Act 930 of 2017 ushers in “next generation accountability” to give local districts more flexibility and to factor in more varied measures of student achievement.

 

Some educators express caution that giving letter grades to individual schools can create misconceptions, if parents and civic leaders focus only on the letter grade.

 

Numerous factors must be taken into account to accurately measure how well a school educates children. One of the most important is the socio-economic level of the students. In general, children from prosperous homes have better scores on standardized tests than children from low-income homes.

 

Holding schools accountable is part of the legislature’s constitutional duty to provide all children with an equitable and adequate education, as mandated by the state Constitution and affirmed by the state Supreme Court in the historic Lake View case.

 

Arkansas Still Leads in Mallard Hunt

 

According to a recent report from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Arkansas is still the national leader in the hunt for mallards.

 

Last year hunters in Arkansas shot 477,817 mallards, which not only was more than in any other state but more than the entire Atlantic flyway.

 

Although anecdotal evidence from some hunters indicated that it was a less productive season than usual, it is no surprise that Arkansas led the nation in mallard hunting because of the abundance of wetland habitat that mallards prefer. Also, Arkansas is geographically situated along the migration route that mallards follow when they fly south for the winter.

 

10-11-19 9:00 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Weekend Activities At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

 

For more information about any of these activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena, dial (479) 394-2863 or visit the park's website. All park activities are open to the public, not just campers and motel guests.

 

Friday, October 11th

 

Color Hike starting at 11:30 am and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater. With fall in season, join Park Interpreter Melissa on a 1/2-mile hike to see how many different colors we can identify on the Spring Trail.

 

Champion Trees starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. Do you ever wonder what the largest tree of its species are called? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will talk about the Champion Trees in Arkansas and where their located.

 

Arkansas Furs starting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. What animals do we have here at Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will talk about the animals that we have here in the park, and you will get to feel their furs.

 

Sunset Art in the Park starting at 6:15 pm and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet in the Picnic Area. It is time to express yourself! We all have an artist inside, and Queen Wilhelmina is the perfect place to get inspired. Join Park Interpreter Melissa and paint a picture of the sun as it sets on Rich Mountain with water colors.

 

Saturday, October 12th

 

Touch Table starting at 11:30 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet in the  Hearth Room. There will be different things that you can see and touch. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun, interactive way of exploring things found in our park, and find out what they are.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Ouachita Walk starting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet on the west side of the Ouachita Trailhead. Join Park Interpreter Melissa and enjoy a serene summer walk on top of the mountain to catch a glimpse of the changes the season brings with it. This will be an easy hike for all ages.

 

Edible Insects starting at 7:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. Is eating bugs a real thing? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and see who really eats bugs. If you’re brave enough you can join the “I Ate A Bug Club!” Bring your appetite and take a bite or come and watch!

 

Sunday, October 13th

 

Sip and Shine starting at 7:15 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet on the east side of Restaurant. Are you a morning person? If so, grab a cup of coffee or your favorite morning drink and join Park Interpreter Melissa as we sip and watch the sunrise. Free coffee is available in the lobby of the Lodge. We recommend bringing your cameras to capture the beautiful sunrise.

 

Bird Watching starting at 7:45 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet on the north side of Lovers Leap. Whether you’re a beginner or pro at birding, join park interpreter Melissa as we hike to the observation deck. We will be watching for birds along the way. Bring your binoculars and we will see how many birds we can identify.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House. Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Bird Bingo starting at 1:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room. This is not your ordinary bingo game. In this game of bingo, you will learn about the birds of Arkansas. If you are interested in birds, then you will enjoy this game. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun filled game of Bingo.

 

10-10-19 6:52 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

 

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Polk County's 175th Birthday Celebration Friday In Mena

UPDATE-Due to the weather, this event will take place in the courtroom of the Polk County Courthouse at 2:00 p.m. Friday, October 11, 2019, as per County Judge Brandon Ellison. 

 

Polk County will soon be 175 years old and the public is invited to help celebrate this important milestone at an event in Mena on Friday, October 11, 2019 at the Polk County Courthouse in Mena starting at 2:00 p.m. There will be a short presentation about the history of the county and comments from elected officials.

Polk County officially will be 175 yeas old November 30, 2019 having been established on November 30, 1844 as the 48th Arkansas County. The new county was originally part of Sevier County. Six years later in 1850 the population was 1,263. The 2010 population was 20,662. The original County Seat was Dallas and was moved to Mena in 1898.

 

Polk County has six incorporated towns including Mena, Grannis, Wickes, Cove, Vandervoort and Hatfield. Geographically, the county is 862 square miles, 858 of that land and 4.8 square miles of water.

 

Polk County was named for the President at the time of formation, James K. Polk.

 

10-10-19 3:16 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

 

 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments October 4th, 7th, 9th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Cody D. Dees, W/M, age 34, Count I: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Cody D. Dees, W/M, age 34, Delivery Of Methamphetamine Or Cocaine, a Class "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. James B. Stuart, Jr., W/M, age 50, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Harry B. Laird, Jr., W/M, age 59, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "C" Felony. The State of Arkansas intends to pursue enhanced penalties due to the fact that he has been convicted of four (4) or more felonies.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Ian A. Hoffman, W/M, age 18, Count I: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count II: Theft Of Property, a Class "D" Felony. Count III-IV: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony.
 
10-10-19 12:11 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Forest Service in Arkansas and Oklahoma Conducting Visitor Information Surveys

Forest Service in Arkansas and Oklahoma conducting visitor information surveys

Information gathered will be used to plan for recreation opportunities on the Forests

 

RUSSELLVILLE, Ark. - In an effort to learn how people use their public lands, the Ouachita and the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests began collecting visitor information through surveys starting on October 1st. 

 

The Forest Service uses the National Visitor Use Monitoring survey program to produce estimates of the number of visitors to the National Forests and Grasslands. The survey also includes measuring forest visitors’ satisfaction and the amount of money spent during visits. Information from the surveys helps both forests plan for future recreation opportunities. The surveys will continue until the end of September 2020. During this time, the public will encounter both forest and contract employees working in developed and dispersed recreation sites and along forest service roads. Workers will be out in all types of weather conditions, wearing bright orange vests and near a sign saying “Traffic Survey Ahead.”

 

“We encourage everyone that possibly can to participate in the survey,” said Bill Jackson, the Ouachita National Forest recreation program manager. “The survey will provide visitors to the national forests in Arkansas and Oklahoma an opportunity to let forest managers know how we can improve their recreation experience. Although the survey is entirely voluntary, participation is extremely important so we can assess visitor experiences and strive to make the Forests a better place to visit.”

 

The information gathered is useful for forest and local community tourism planning. It provides national forest managers with an estimate of how many people recreate on the national forest, what activities they engaged in while there and how satisfied people are with their visit. Economic impact to the local economy is also captured in the survey.

 

The survey, which occurs every five years, gathers basic visitor information. Surveys are voluntary and all responses are confidential; names are not included. “The survey takes only about 10 minutes to complete,” said Ozark-St. Francis National Forests Recreation Program Manager, Robert Duggan. “We would appreciate it if visitors would answer the few questions and participate in the survey. It’s important for interviewers to talk with local people using the forest, as well as out-of-area visitors, so all types of visitors are represented in the study.”

 

Information about the National Visitor Use Monitoring program can be found at:  https://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/nvum/.

 

10-9-19 9:15 p.m. KAWX.ORG

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Oct. 2, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state you are interested in for the fishing report.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

10-9-19 5:26 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Polk County Sheriff's Log September 30th - October 6th

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of September 30 – October 6, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


September 30, 2019
Traffic stop on Highway 8 East near Board Camp led to the confiscation of several suspicious items.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from a complainant on Polk 93 near Potter of an altercation that had occurred earlier in the evening.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Hamilton Street in Mena of a missing cell phone, valued at $100.  As a result, a Citation for Theft of Property was issued to Marsha D. Denton, 35, of Mena.  The phone was returned to the owner.
Report from complainant on Polk 61 near Board Camp that their goat had been attacked by five dogs, causing damages of $150.00.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Lester Warren, 38, of Texarkana, on a Warrant for Failure to Appear.


October 1, 2019
Arrested was Andrea D. Main, 30, of Mena, on Charges of Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and a Warrant for two counts of Delivery of Meth or Cocaine.
Report from complainant on Polk 191 near Ink of damage done to a vehicle while parked at another location.  Deputy responded.
Report from complainant on Polk 238 near Mena of a neighbor’s horse being on their property led to a Citation for Livestock at Large being issued to Gary Goldner, 63, of Mena.


October 2, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Shady Grove of the fraudulent use of a credit card, totaling losses at $150.00.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Cody D. Dees, 34, of Mena, on Warrants for Delivery of Meth or Cocaine and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.


October 3, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 63 near Board Camp of damage done to a fence by an unknown vehicle.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Cove of being threatened by an acquaintance.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


October 4, 2019
Report of a missing storage building from a property at Polk 614 near Mena.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Arrested by a trooper with the Arkansas State Police was James B. Stuart, 50, of Mena, on a Warrant for Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.


October 5, 2019
Report of an unattended death on Polk 47 near Rocky.  Deputies responded.
Report from complainant on Polk 36 near Hatfield of issues with a neighbor.  Deputy responded.
Report from a business on Highway 71 South in Cove of a suspected shoplifter.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


October 6, 2019
Report of a disturbance on The Fast Lane near Mena led to the arrest of Alan Currier, 45, of Mena, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked two vehicle accidents this week.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 24 Incarcerated Inmates , with 9 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00711

 

10-8-19 12:57 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Mena Police Report For September 29th - October 5th

Reports from September 29, 2019 through October 5, 2019, 2019 f

 

September 29, 2019

Garrett Bosley, 19, of Mena charged with criminal trespass after a call to a local retail store.

Justin Chicago, 21, of Mena was charged with DWI and driving left of center.  The arrest followed a call regarding reckless driving.

 

September 30, 2019

Report was made of someone trying to run them off the road.  No charges have been filed.

 

October 1 & 2, 2019

Report was made by a local woman regarding having been harassed and attacked by an acquaintance.  Case is currently under investigation.

A woman reported that her vehicle had been damaged while she was shopping at a local store.  Case is pending receipt and review of surveillance tape from the business.

Mariah R. Wright, 26, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from the Mena police.

 

October 3, 2019

Jessica Fay Stepp, 18 and a 16-year-old Mena girl were charged with shoplifting after a call to a local retail store.

 

October 4, 2019

Travis M. Dollarhyde, 30, of Mena was charged with battery after officers responded to a call reporting an altercation at a local residence.

Lucas Holliday, 29, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance.

William Stokes, 32 of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from the Mena police.

 

October 5, 2019

Christopher Brown 35, of Mena was charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct after officers observed a verbal altercation on the parking lot of a local business.

Allen Henry, 30, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant from Polk County.

 

10-7-19 11:14 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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Mena City Council Meets Tuesday, October 8th

 
The Mena City Council will meet Tuesday, October 8, 2019 at Mena City Hall. The regular monthly meeting of the Council will start at 6:00 p.m. and is open to the public.

 

New business on the agenda includes:

 

The consideration of a resolution conveying an easement to Jimmy Andrew Ayers and Sara M. Ayers

 

Consideration of a resolution authorizing the Mayor to apply for a grant for the purpose of purchasing protective clothing for Mena firemen

 

Consideration of a resolution authorizing the City Clerk/Treasurer to destroy outdated records and documents no longer needed

 

Consideration of an ordinance and application of Ouachita Brewing Company, Inc. for a microbrewery-restaurant private club permit to be located at 821 Mena Street in Mena

 

Discussion a of financing for the Mena Water Department to purchase a used backhoe

 

Discussion about improvements to Fire Station No. 1.

 

The Council will also tend to routine business and hear reports for department heads and commissions.

 

10-6-19 5:09 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

 

 

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Fibber McGee & Molly Weekdays on KAWX Starting October 7th

 

More Old Time Radio Coming To Community Radio KAWX

 

Fibber McGee and Molly was an American radio comedy series. A staple of the NBC Red Network for the show's entire run and one of the most popular and enduring radio series of its time, the prime time situation comedy ran as a standalone series from 1935 to 1956, then continued as a short-form series as part of the weekend Monitor from 1957 to 1959. The title characters were created and portrayed by Jim and Marian Jordan, a real-life husband and wife team that had been working in radio since the 1920s.

 

 

Beginning Monday, October 7, 2019, Fibber McGee and Molly can be heard weekdays at 7:00 p.m. central time on KAWX and KAWX.ORG.

 

KAWX is heard in the Mena area on 93.1 FM, and in the Hatfield - Cove - Vandervoort area on 94.9 FM. For those not in these areas, listen anywhere in the world at KAWX.ORG, or with a free KAWX app for your smartphone or tablet available at the App Store or Google Play. KAWX can also be be heard on any smart device with the TuneIn app, and on Amazon Echo!

 

In addition to Fibber McGee and Molly, KAWX airs Lum and Abner and Superman weekdays starting at 6:30 p.m., and will air the complete War Of The Worlds (1938) broadcast again this year on October 31st starting at 5:00 p.m. 

 

10-5-19 2:04 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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AGFC Requesting Help Keeping Tabs On Arkansas Bear Population

 

LITTLE ROCK — Just about every hunting camp in bear territory has a tale or two to tell about a mischievous bruin finding its way into their feeder or trash bins. Over the years, those stories have expanded from the Ozark and Ouachita mountains into the southern half of the state, prompting Arkansas Game and Fish Commission biologists to keep a watchful eye on growing bear populations throughout Arkansas. As part of this expanded monitoring effort, biologists are asking hunters and outdoors enthusiasts to help record bear sightings through a simple online survey on iNaturalist.org.

 

The Arkansas Bear Survey listed on iNaturalist provides credible observation and or photo documentation of black bear locations within the state to help biologists expand their collection of data.

 

Myron Means, large carnivore program coordinator for the AGFC, says game camera footage combined with increased technology in smartphones has enabled more public participation in data collection.  

 

“We receive images and reports of bears in feeders all the time, and we know the bears are expanding into new areas,” Means said. “This survey will help us gather location information as well as some basic biological information such as sex, recruitment and relative age class.”

 

Participating in the survey requires a free account with iNaturalist.org, which takes less than 5 minutes to set up. Once you have established an account, you may enter sightings as you come across bears in The Natural State.     

 

“Ideally, the best information will be photos that are accurately date stamped and in electronic format where they can be uploaded to the iNaturalist.org website for further review,” said Mark Hooks, regional biologist supervisor for the AGFC at the Monticello Regional Office.  “Actual observation information without a picture is also useful, particularly if you can provide the approximate location and date of that observation.”

 

For more information on how to participate in this survey, contact Hooks at 877-367-3559.
 

Sign up With iNaturalist to Record Your Sighting

 

10-5-19 11:36 a.m. KAWX.ORG

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US and Arkansas Flags To Half Staff Sunday for Fallen Firefighters

 

In accordance with Public Law 107-51, the 1st Sunday of October is the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. The United States flag and the

 

state flag of Arkansas will be lowered to half-staff on Sunday, October 6, 2019, in honor of the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service.

 

The Presidential Proclamation for Fire Prevention Week, 2019, can be found HERE.

 

10-4-19 8:10 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Improving Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange During Service in Thailand

 

The convenience of email has changed the manner in which Americans communicate with their elected officials. These days, there are fewer and fewer letters delivered to the Capitol by the U.S. Postal Service. So, when a stack of orange envelopes arrived in my Washington, D.C. office in mid-September it caught my attention. That was the idea behind a campaign initiated by Mena, Arkansas veteran Bill Rhodes and his fellow veterans who served in Thailand during the Vietnam War.

 

After developing illnesses linked to herbicide exposure during his service in Thailand, Rhodes filed a claim with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). His claim was denied because the location he served in is not recognized as having been treated with herbicides.

 

The VA currently awards service-connected benefits for exposure to Agent Orange to veterans whose duties placed them on or near the perimeters of Thai military bases from February 28, 1961 to May 7, 1975. This restriction arbitrarily disqualifies veterans who may otherwise be able to prove their exposure, regardless of their assigned duties during their time stationed in Thailand. For veterans like Rhodes who served in Nam Phong, Thailand, this is a policy they are calling on Congress to change.

 

That’s why I introduced legislation to eliminate existing barriers to benefits for veterans who served in Thailand during the Vietnam War. These veterans have been left behind by the current limitations on the presumption of toxic exposure to Agent Orange. Restricting service-connected benefits for our men and women assigned to certain locations and career fields in Thailand during their military service is undermining the commitment we made to veterans.

 

While there is a proposed legislative fix, Rhodes and his fellow veterans who served in Thailand and suffer from Agent Orange-related illnesses are continuing to press Congress to take action to update the presumption policy through the orange envelope letter-writing campaign.

 

To reinforce their message, I brought the letters and orange envelopes to a recent Senate VA Committee hearing on toxic exposure. We heard from VA officials about the agency’s decision-making process when determining benefit eligibility for veterans whose illnesses were caused by exposure to toxic hazards while on active duty. I reminded my colleagues of the legislation to help these veterans and encouraged them to keep these veterans and their families in mind as we improve veteran benefits policies.

 

At the hearing, I pressed VA officials on the department’s policy of limiting benefits for Thailand service as well as the process for implementing changes, and I encouraged them to revise the rule. VA representatives said the Department of Defense has provided updated information about Agent Orange use in new areas. The VA is looking at that data now to determine if changes should be made.

 

Sometimes it takes an act of Congress to modernize benefits like in the case with the Blue Water Navy legislation. This legislation expands benefits to veterans who served aboard ships off the coast of Vietnam. In other cases, the VA gets new information about exposure to toxins or side effects that make veterans eligible for additional benefits. I am hopeful that we can build on this momentum to ensure all of our veterans who were called to serve get the care they have earned.

 

10-4-19 4:37 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

Last flu season, 113 influenza related deaths were reported in Arkansas. According to the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), 71% of the adults who died were unvaccinated or had an unknown vaccine history.
 
ADH also reported that 28 schools closed briefly due to the flu last season.
 
While only moderate in severity, the 2018-2019 season was record-breaking in duration, with flu activity remaining elevated for 21 weeks. The 2017-2018 flu season was the most severe in a decade, with 228 deaths in the state.
 
If you have not already done so, now is the time to get your flu vaccine. Last week, the ADH began its yearly mass flu vaccine clinic effort, which involves mass vaccine clinics in every county at no cost. Clinics will continue through the beginning of November.  The department will also offer the vaccine at every public school. 
 
People of all ages can get the flu, but certain people are more likely to have serious health problems with it. This includes older adults, young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), people who smoke, and people who live in nursing homes. Therefore, ADH strongly recommends that people in these groups get a flu vaccine. It is also recommended that friends, family members and people who provide care to people in these groups also get a vaccine.
 
The flu vaccine is safe and does not cause the flu.
 
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a 2017 study showed that flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized flu patients.
 
Overall, CDC estimates show that flu vaccination coverage has increased over the past decade. Vaccination among kids across all ages was almost 63 percent. Vaccination coverage among adults is around 45%, leaving more than half of adult Americans unprotected from flu each season. 
 
We have posted the schedules of the mass clinics and school visits on our website, www.arkansashouse.org.
 
10-4-19  4:23 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Gov. Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Taking Arkansas to the Other Side of the World

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Taking Arkansas to the Other Side of the World
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – Governor Hutchinson brings this week's address from Mumbai while on his economic trade mission to India and the United Arab Emirates. 
Today I want to report on my current international trip as I make the case that Arkansas is a great place to do business.
 
This trip has taken me to Dubai in the United Arab Emirates and to India. While some question the need to pursue foreign investment in Arkansas, I am more convinced than ever of the importance of showcasing Arkansas and all that we have to offer. We must continue pursuing high-quality investments in our state.
 
But trips such as this also give us an opportunity to support our existing industry.
 
Earlier in the week, we helped celebrate the opening of a new office for First Orion in Dubai.  First Orion is a fast-growing technology company located in Arkansas.
 
And then on Tuesday, I met with the CEO and managing directors of Welspun in their corporate offices in Mumbai.  Welspun is in the textile business, but in 2009, the company opened a steel-pipe manufacturing facility in our state that today employs over 1,000 Arkansans. Welspun is just one example of foreign investment that is paying real dividends by creating good-paying jobs as a business leader in the state.
 
At the meeting with Welspun, our new Secretary of Commerce Mike Preston and I made the case to the CEO of Welspun that Arkansas will be a good partner for future business opportunities. Mike also is the director of our state’s economic development agency.
 
On Thursday, I met with the leaders of 10 different companies who are considering investments in the United States. I told them they will not find a better place to invest and manufacture products than Arkansas. I cited our skilled workforce, our central location, our easy access to waterways and interstates, and our great quality of life.
 
On the same day, we signed a Mutual Cooperation Agreement with the Indo-American Chamber of Commerce. This provides a path for cooperation and encourages investment between private sector businesses and Arkansas.
 
Friday, we met with more leaders of industry. And we spread the good news about Arkansas in interviews with Indian media. This is just a sample of our five days of work with a variety of businesses that ranged from technology firms to machine manufacturers.
 
I have two abiding thoughts as I travel back to Little Rock. First, there is no place in the world that comes close to matching what we have in Arkansas. I am ready to be home. Second, our future is filled with opportunity. These are exciting days, and there is more yet to come as our economy expands and our population grows.
 
10-4-19  3:29 p.m.  KAWX.ORG

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Flags To Half Staff for Fallen Firefighters Sunday, October 6th

 

Fly the United States Flag at Half-Staff on Sunday, October 6, 2019 in Honor of National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service.

 

The United States Congress created the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation to lead a nationwide effort to remember America's fallen firefighters. Since 1992, the tax-exempt, nonprofit Foundation has developed and expanded programs to honor our fallen fire heroes and assist their families and coworkers.

 

The 38th National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service will be held Sunday, October 6, 2019, to honor 92 firefighters who died in the line of duty in 2018 and 27 firefighters who died in the line of duty in previous years.   

 

In accordance to Public Law 107-51, the American flag should be lowered to half-staff on Sunday, October 6, 2019 from sunrise to sunset in observance of National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. 

10-4-19 10:25 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

October 4, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The state Board of Correction has voted to pursue an agreement with Bradley and Drew Counties in southeast Arkansas to set up a private prison.

 

It would house 500 male inmates, as well as offenders from local county jails.

 

The counties have been working with LaSalle Corrections of Ruston, Louisiana, a private company that also operates the Bowie County Correctional Center in Texarkana, Texas. Arkansas pays to house state inmates at the Bowie facility, because of overcrowding in Arkansas prison units.

 

If the state and the two counties finalize an agreement with LaSalle, it would mark the second time that Arkansas sentenced inmates to private prisons. For about three-and-a-half years in the late 1990s, a private firm called Wackenhut Corrections Corporation operated two units near Newport, the Grimes Unit and the McPherson Unit.

 

In 2001 the state Correction Department took over the two units, after Wackenhut decided against renewing its contract. The Grimes Unit housed youthful male offenders and the McPherson Unit housed females. Both units had 600 beds and both opened in 1998.

 

The contract approved by the Correction Board is between the state Department of Corrections and Bradley and Drew Counties, and it would be for 20 years.

 

The two counties would work out an agreement with LaSalle, and the agreement must allow state Correction officials to inspect the private facility at any time. After a reasonable notice, state inspectors could access areas off limits to inmates.

 

The contract between the counties and LaSalle shall provide for GED programs and other educational programs for inmates.

 

The cost of operating a prison include the cost of vo-tech classes, GED programs, rehabilitation for drug and alcohol addiction and basic health care.

 

The state is looking into the contract with LaSalle because of the potential to save tax dollars. Supporters of private prisons include legislators in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

 

The question will be how inmates in the private facility are prepared for life outside prison. Critics of private prisons, including members of the legislature, have expressed concerns that private companies make profits by scrimping on staff and on rehabilitation programs.

 

The contract with LaSalle shall prohibit any person or company from profiting from the labor of inmates.

 

There are still many steps to take before Arkansas opens another private prison facility. Attorneys for all the parties must review the contracts. Reimbursement rates that the state would pay have to be determined, and the facility must be built. According to news reports, LaSalle would build the prison at its own expense.

 

Revenue Report

 

The first quarter of the fiscal year shows solid growth in the Arkansas economy. Net available revenue was up 2.9 percent over last year. Tax rates have not gone up, so the increase is due to greater economic activity.

 

Individual income taxes are up 4.2 percent over the same period last year, which is an indication that more people are working and getting paid more.

 

Sales and use taxes, which indicate how much people are spending, were up 1.4 percent over the first quarter of last year.

 

10-4-19 9:01 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Get the Facts Straight Before You Vape

ATTORNEY GENERAL ALERT: Get the Facts Straight Before You Vape

Says, ‘Just because the vaping industry says vapes are safer than cigarettes does not mean they are safe’

LITTLE ROCK – There is a lot of misinformation about e-cigarettes and vapes, but you should get the facts straight before you vape. Vaping is the act of inhaling a vapor, which is produced by an e-cigarette or similar device. The term “vaping” is used because e-cigarettes do not produce smoke as traditional cigarettes do, but rather an aerosol that consists of fine particles potentially containing varying amounts of toxic chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, as well as seizures, respiratory and heart diseases.

 

“In recent months, the rampant use of e-cigarettes among teens and preteens has hit a fever pitch with too many young people identified by medical experts as being harmed by inhaling these powerful chemicals,” said Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. “Just because the vaping industry says vapes are safer than cigarettes does not mean they are safe. Through education, enforcement and consumer protection, we can help protect an entire generation from becoming addicted to nicotine.”

 

E-cigarettes are marketed as a safe alternative to cigarettes, but in reality they are not. Attorney General Rutledge has released the following facts about vaping to help parents protect their children.

 

  • Many e-liquids used in vapes are as strong or stronger than cigarettes and can contain as much nicotine as an entire pack of cigarettes.
  • Vapes can be easily disguised in clothing pockets, backpacks and purses; they can look like a USB drive or pen and some are even covered with cartoon character designs.
  • Arkansas teenagers and children are twice as likely to start using e-cigarettes and vapes as compared to adults.
  • Vape pods and e-liquids are sold in many different flavors including fruit, cinnamon, candy and crème.
  • The average age of first time Arkansas users is 14 years old.
  • In Arkansas, it is illegal to buy nicotine products, including vapes, online or through the mail.

 

Attorney General Rutledge will be hosting Youth Vaping Summits at Arkansas Children’s, Children’s Hall on October 7th starting at 9 a.m. and at Bentonville High School on October 9th starting at 2 p.m. The Summit will include discussions and panels from health care professionals, educators, law enforcement, concerned parents and representatives from the Arkansas Attorney General’s Office.

 

For more information or to attend one of the Youth Vaping Summits, call the Arkansas Attorney General’s Office at 800-482-8982 or visit ArkansasAG.gov.

 

10-4-19 8:51 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekend Activities At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

 

All the activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park listed below are open to the public, not just campers or inn guests. For for information call (479) 394-2863 or visit the park's website by clicking here.

 

Friday October 4th

 

Fall Foliage Walk starting at 11:00 am and lasting around 1 hour. Meet on the north side of Lovers’ Leap.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take an easy stroll to the Lovers' Leap observation deck and observer the fall foliage along the way.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 3:00 pm and lasting around 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Finding the Uniqueness starting at 4:00 pm and lasting around 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater.

Queen Wilhelmina State Park is a unique resource filled with special things you can discover while you are here. Join Park Interpreter Melissa to learn unique aspects about our park.

 

Sunset Hike starting at 6:45 pm and lasting around 30 minutes. Meet beside the Telescopes.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa, for an easy stroll to watch the sunset. Feel free to bring your camera to take photos of this beautiful view.

 

Saturday, October 5th

 

Reservoir Hike starting at 9:00 am and lasting around 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet at the  Reservoir Trailhead.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a hike to what used to be the old water system for the 1898 hotel.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 11:00 am and lasting around 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Behind the Scenes starting at 1:00 pm and lasting around 2 hours. Meet in the Conference Room.

Southwest Arkansas Regional Archives (SARA) Archival Manager Melissa Nesbitt will present “Behind the Scenes: How to Start Researching Your Family History.” The workshop is an introduction into basic genealogy research. Attendees can bring family information, such as family members’ full names, place of residency and dates of birth, marriage and death for help researching. Participants will have the chance to ask questions and practice research skills gleaned from the workshop! For more information about the workshop or SARA, contact Melissa Nesbitt at melissa.nesbitt@arkansas.gov or (870) 983-2633.

 

Sunday, October 6th 

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s. 


Dutch Oven Demonstration starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet at the Pavilion.

Are you in need of a tasty treat for this weekend? Stop by Queen Wilhelmina picnic area to find out how much better dessert is cooked over a fire! Park Interpreter Melissa will be using the state vessel – a Dutch oven – to cook-up a simple and delicious dessert. Come by for a taste.

 

Volleyball starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Volleyball Court.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa in an afternoon game of volleyball. No experience needed. Just come and have fun.

 

10-3-19 2:44 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments October 1st, 2nd

 
All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Robert I. Pierce, W/M, age 41, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Andrea Main, W/F, age 30, Count I: Delivery Of Methamphetamine Or Cocaine, a Class "C" Felony. The State of Arkansas intends to pursue enhanced penalties since it is alleged that she possessed methamphetamine with the purpose to deliver within 1,000 feet of Janssen Park in Mena, subjecting her to an additional consecutive sentence of ten years. Count II: Delivery Of Methamphetamine Or Cocaine, a Class "B" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Andrea Main, W/F, age 30, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
10-3-19 1:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Woman Arrested and Jailed On Drug Charges

PRESS   RELEASE
Sheriff D. Scott Sawyer
Polk County Sheriff’s Office

10/3/2019

On Tuesday, October 1, 2019 Polk County Deputies arrested Andrea D. Main, age 30 of Mena, at a residence in Mena.  Main was arrested on two outstanding warrants for Delivery of Methamphetamines.

These warrants were the result of a narcotic distribution investigation conducted by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and the 18th Judicial West Drug Task Force.  During the arrest of Main, two small baggies of suspected methamphetamines and various items of drug paraphernalia were found in Main’s possession.

Main was transported to the Polk County Detention Center.  She is currently facing charges of two counts of Delivery of Methamphetamines, Possession of Methamphetamines, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.  Main’s bond was set at $15,000.00.

All suspects are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

10-3-19 10:32 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

 

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Oct. 2, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the are of the state below you are interested in for fishing reports from that area.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

10-2-19 2:11 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

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Cossatot River Trail Run October 19th

 

The 9th Annual Half Marathon at Cossatot River State Park-Natural area near Wickes (Polk County) will be held this year on October 19th.

Victoria Carson of the State Park said that anyone needing additional informatiion could call the park at (870) 385-2201.


To register for the half marathon visit www.getmeregistered.com.

 

10-2-19 1:54 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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37th Annual Ouachita Quilt Show November 1st and 2nd in Mena

 
The 37th Annual Ouachita Quilt Show will be held November 1st and 2nd in Mena from 9:00 a.m until 5:00 p.m. both days at the Historic Armory on De Queen Street in Mena.
 
Quilt entries will only be accepted on Tuesday, October 29th from 12:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the Armory. Raffle tickets will be on sale at the Quilt Show both days.
 
There will be a Quilt Raffle at 4:30 p.m. on November 2nd with the proceeds going to the Single Parent Scholarship fund at UARM. The quilt that will be raffled is shown below.
There will also be prizes for quilt show winners.
 
For more about the Quilt Show, visit their website by clicking here.
 
10-1-19 7:52 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Fire Protection Week October 6th - 12th, Mayor Smith Signs Proclamation

 

Fire Protection Week is October 6th thru October 12th and the 2019 theme is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!”?

 

To recognize Fire Protection Week, Mena Mayor Seth Smith signed a proclamation at City Hall.

 

 

Observing Mayor Smith signing the proclamation are Mena Assistant Fire Chief Charles Hankins (left) and Mena Fire Chief Steve Egger (right).

 

The Mena Fire Department and Arkansas Forestry Commission will present a program for students at Louise Durham Elementary October 10th at along with Fire Pup and Smokey Bear.

 

 

The Acorn Fire Department and Arkansas Forestry Commission will present a program at Acorn School on October 11th.

 

 

10-1-19 6:30 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

 

 

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Mena Homecoming Schedule

 

 

A number of changes have been made to the Mena High School Homecoming Schedule on Friday, October 4th.

 

 

 

10:30am - Homecoming Pep Rally in the UBC (Union Bank Center).


5:00pm - Bearcat Stadium gates open.


6:15pm - Homecoming Court Ceremony.


6:45pm - Air Evac delivers game ball.


7:00pm - Kickoff vs Pottsville.


Following the game - Homecoming Dance in MMS cafeteria.


Please share & spread the word and GO BEARCATS!

 

Don't forget about the homecoming parade in downdown Mena on Wednesday, October 2nd starting at 5:30 p.m.

 

10-1-19 4:58 p.m. KAWX.ORG

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Acorn High School Band and Choir Concert Thursday, October 3rd

 

The Acorn High School Band and Choir will host their annual Fall Fund Concert this Thursday night, October 3rd, at 7:00 pm in the new cafeteria. 

 

Admission is free and everyone is invited. 

 

For those interested, donations will be accepted to support the Music Department. 

 

Music will range from hits from the 50's and 60's to traditional spirituals and pop numbers. 

 

10-1-19 8:51 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Weather