KAWX News Archives for 2019-11

Winter Weather Awareness Week Observed December 1st-6th In Arkansas

 
Follow daily weather forecasts posts on KAWX social media for Winter Weather safety and prepardness information starting December 1st.
 
Winter can bring a variety of hazardous weather conditions to the Natural State, including heavy snow, ice, and cold temperatures. These conditions can make driving conditions hazardous, with power outages occurring at times. In the end, you may become exposed to the elements...with your life threatened.

To help Arkansans prepare for these conditions, a special week has been set to review safety rules and to better understand the hazards of winter. This year, Winter Weather Awareness Week runs from December 1 - 6, 2019.

For our Winter Weather Awareness Week, the following safety topics will be highlighted:
 
Sunday: Introduction to Winter Weather Awareness Week - Introduces the #WinterPrep week ahead.

Monday: Outlook for the Upcoming Winter — Provides a general outlook for the temperature and precipitation expectations expected from December - February across Arkansas this winter season.

Tuesday: Winter Precipitation Types — Highlights the different types of wintry precipitation that are possible across the state and what weather conditions typically cause these different types of wintry weather.

Wednesday: Winter Weather Watches, Warnings and Advisories — We will describe what the National Weather Service means when we issue winter weather watches, warnings, and advisories this winter. We will also be introducing a new warning, the “Snow Squall Warning”, which will be rarely issued, but is new for 2019.

Thursday: Winter Weather Safety Rules — We’ll talk about what you can do to prepare for winter storms, and offer tips and strategies to help keep you and your family safe at home or if you’re travelling across Arkansas this winter.
 
Friday: The Cold of Winter — We’ll be talking more about winter weather safety… but focusing strictly on cold weather versus staying safe in times of frozen precipitation. Even without snow and ice, cold air temperatures can lead to exposure dangers if you’re not properly prepared to be outdoors.

Each day we will be releasing information via social media, our web page, and NOAA Weather Radio highlighting the content listed above.

For more information, please visit: http://www.weather.gov/LZK/win1a.htm.
 
 
11-30-19 1:20 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 
To listen to Mena, Arkansas NOAA Weather Radio Station KXI97 on your PC, click on the weather radio below, or download the Mena Weather Radio app for your tablet or phone from the App Store or Google Play. More local weather information is available at KAWX.ORG or by dialing (479) 394-5600.
 

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December Activities At Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area

 
For more information about any of the December activities at CRSP near Wickes, or the park, dial (870) 385-2201 or visit the park's website by clicking here.
 
Sunday, December 1st
 
9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Bundle Up! (1 hour) It is getting cold outside and it is the time of year for us to break out our coats and make hot cocoa to stay warm.  Join a park interpreter to learn about the animals that live here and how they stay warm to survive the winter.
Meeting Place:  Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.
 
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry!  Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center.
 
Sunday, December 8th
 
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry!  Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center.
 
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Cossatot Craft Corner (1 hour) Do you enjoy being creative?  Would you like to begin earning an explorer badge?  Join a park interpreter to use your creativity, have fun, and discover something special that can be found in the park.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center’s Legacy Room.
 
Saturday, December 14th
 
6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Christmas Open House Celebrate the holidays with the staff at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Bring your kids to share their Christmas wish with Santa Clause. Please bring your camera if you would like a photo. Enjoy spectacular decorations in the Visitor Center and the trail of lights outside. Other activities available include a Christmas movie, a craft, and face painting. A chili dinner will be served by the Nazarene Church’s youth group. Donations for the meal will be accepted. Popcorn and hot cocoa will also be available.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center.
 
Sunday, December 15th
 
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Morning Stroll (1.5 hours) Join a park interpreter for a hike on the scenic River Corridor Trail. Feel Free to bring binoculars; who knows what we will see or stir up.  
Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.
 
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry!  Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center.
 
Saturday, December 21st
 
9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Constellation Exploration (1 hour) Clear winter skies offer great opportunities to see the stars. Constellations drew pictures for storytelling in both the past and the present at Cossatot River State Park.  Join a park interpreter to learn about the constellations you may see in the park and create your own constellation and story.
Meeting Place: Sandbar Picnic Area.
 
2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Animal Charades (1 hour) How creative is your mind and your team?  Meet a park interpreter in a couple of games like Charades and Pictionary, to see if you can imitate selected Cossatot River State Park creatures. The challenge is on!  May the best team win!
Meeting Place: Cossatot Falls Parking Lot.
 
Sunday, December 22nd
 
9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Morning Stroll (2 hours) Join Park Interpreter Carson for this easy to moderate, 2-mile guided hike to Goat’s Bluff Overlook on the Harris Creek Trail.  Feel Free to bring binoculars; who knows what we will see or stir up.  Meeting Place: Harris Creek Trailhead.
 
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Feed the Critters (1 hour) It’s dinner time and the critters are hungry!  Come and watch them eat and learn about the animals here at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.
Meeting Place: Visitor Center.
 
11-30-19 12:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: The Stradivarius of Turkey Calls

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: The Stradivarius of Turkey Calls 
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – An Arkansan you probably don’t know about was responsible for a lot of the turkey that made it to the Thanksgiving table a hundred-twenty years ago.
 
That was long before Arkansas became the Number 3 producer of turkeys in the United States. Did you know that every Butterball turkey that shows up at Thanksgiving in the United States came from Arkansas?
 
Every year, our turkey farmers raise 32 million turkeys, which weigh in at 595 million pounds, or 30,000 tons. The turkey industry creates and supports 20,000 jobs in Arkansas with an average of $46,000 in wages and benefits. Turkeys contribute $304 million a year to our economy. In 2018, the industry was responsible for nearly $5 billion in total economic activity throughout the state.
 
But in the late 1800s, a Thanksgiving turkey wasn’t always so easy to get. Today, I’m going to share the story of a man who changed that, at least for people who wanted wild turkeys for their table.
 
Henry C. Gibson was a farmer who lived in Dardanelle. He was a manager for the Western Arkansas Hedge and Wire Fence Company.
 
In 1897, he and a partner from Arkadelphia patented a turkey call that was a simple wooden box. A thin paddle is attached to the top of the box. When you scrape the paddle across the top, it makes the various sounds of a turkey.
 
Randy Zellers of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission says the Gibson Box Call is the most trusted and copied turkey call in the history of turkey calls. To the untrained human ear, the sound is like fingernails on a chalk board.  
 
Randy says that while many others have built similar calls over the years, the basic design hasn’t changed. With a couple hours of practice, even a beginner can sound like a turkey. The sound from the Gibson box has a way of cutting through the wind better than other types of turkey calls.
 
Collectors have paid thousands of dollars for a Gibson Box. Fathers hand them down to their children.
 
Will Primos is a call-maker in Mississippi who has hunted turkey in Arkansas. He calls the Gibson Box the Stradivarius of turkey calls. Several years ago, an elderly customer at his family’s restaurant gave him a Gibson Box that her father had given her. He later donated it to the National Wild Turkey Federation’s museum in North Carolina.
 
At the turn of the last century, the Gibson Box helped hunters put a lot of Thanksgiving turkeys on the family table.  The story of Henry Gibson is like the story of so many entrepreneurs in Arkansas. He invented a quality product, people liked it, and bought it, and he turned his idea into a successful venture that endures more than a century later.
 
Arkansas continues to be that kind of a state. Our entrepreneurs pursue their dreams and find success. Of the many things about Arkansas for which I’m thankful this Thanksgiving, people such as Henry Gibson are high on my list.
 
11-29-19 4:52 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

Typically when a bill is passed in the state legislature, if it does not have an emergency clause, it will take effect 90 days after we adjourn.  But there are occasions when a specific date is written into the bill.  This year, we passed several bills that will take effect January 1, 2020.  These impact everything from auto insurance to tax brackets.

 

Here are several pieces of legislation going into effect at the beginning of the year:

 

ACT 182 reduces the top income tax rate from 6.9% to 6.6%.  This will lower again to 5.9% in 2021.

 

ACT 869 requires the implementation of the online insurance verification system by January 1, 2020. In a routine traffic stop, the new online verification system allows the officer to confirm in real time whether the vehicle is insured. Under the current system, the insurance data accessed by the officer may be up to 30 days old.

 

ACT 774 requires the Department of Finance and Administration to provide space on individual income tax forms for a taxpayer to designate more than one account for the direct deposit of the taxpayer’s refund beginning with returns filed for tax year January 1, 2020.

 

ACT 1063 provides that a tow facility may tow heavy-duty motor vehicles as part of a law enforcement program if the tow facility is licensed by the Arkansas Towing and Recovery Board, passes safety inspections, and complies with state and federal laws.

 

ACT 564 requires the annual publication of the county budget and the annual financial report of the county.

 

ACT 653 prohibits state funding of human cloning and destructive embryo research.

 

ACT 1021 establishes the process for governing directed trusts and clarifies the applicability, principal place of administration, excluded powers, limitations, defenses, and duties and liability of trust directors and directed trustees.

 

ACT 866 prohibits a business that is subject to a business closure order by the Department of Finance and Administration from contracting or doing business with the state.

 

ACT 822 extends the net operating loss carry-forward period to eight years for losses occurring in the tax year starting Jan. 1, 2020.

 

ACT 988 amends the law concerning the reemployment of certain retired members of the Arkansas Local Police and Fire Retirement System. The act applies to a member of the system who on or after January 1, 2020, elects to participate in the Local Police and Fire Deferred Retirement Option Plan, retires from the system as a participant in the Local Police and Fire Deferred Retirement Option Plan, or retires from the system.

 

You can find a complete summary of all the legislation passed in 2019 on our website www.arkansashouse.org.

 

11-29-19 3:50 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Providing Reasonable and Responsible Rules for Effective Avian Predator Management

 

Aquaculture is an important component of Arkansas’s agriculture industry. Our state ranks second in the nation in aquaculture production, which includes species like baitfish, catfish, hybrid striped bass and more. Nearly 5,000 water surface acres across the state are used for aquaculture production, and Arkansas fish farmers contributed $71.1 million to our state’s economy in 2017. A growing number of fish farmers have shared with me their frustrations regarding a threat to their fish – the double-crested cormorant.

 

Double-crested cormorants are aquatic birds that eat mostly fish, so when they migrate south for the winter months, Arkansas fish farms make ideal locations for these birds to prey. With adult birds eating a pound of fish a day, they can do serious damage. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates double-crested cormorants cause more than $25 million in damage annually within the aquaculture industry. These birds have become the foremost antagonists of fish farmers.

 

Aquaculture producers aren’t alone in the fight against avian predators. Arkansas ranchers are increasingly defending their herds against black vultures. These birds are notorious for attacking during the spring and fall calving seasons. USDA reports that black vultures are responsible for 10 percent of all calves lost to predators. This is quite astonishing considering that other predators include the likes of wolves and bears.

 

These birds have proven to be a costly menace. Producers are left with few options to defend their animals because these predators are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Today, populations of double-crested cormorant and black vultures are thriving. The International Union for Conservation of Nature, a leading authority on the global conservation status of species, considers these species of “least concern.” Still, the protected status prevents producers from taking proactive measures to guard their investment without a valid federal permit. The depredation permit is granted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), but it costs producers annually and caps the number of birds they can legally kill. The quantity permitted is often inadequate to stop these predators.

 

We need a commonsense solution that allows ranchers and aquaculture producers to safeguard their animals. I recently pressed FWS for flexibility so our farmers and ranchers can better protect their livestock or aquaculture. In a letter I led to the agency signed by members of the Senate and House of Representatives, including Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton and Congressmen Rick Crawford and Bruce Westerman, we urged the agency to streamline the permitting process and revise its rules to allow greater flexibility for producers to better protect their livelihoods.

 

This problem extends beyond Arkansas, but the good news is our state’s federal elected officials are engaged on this issue and proposing legislative solutions. This summer, cattlemen from Arkansas, Missouri and Mississippi met with FWS and USDA to discuss their problems and possible solutions in a roundtable hosted by Congressman Crawford. Legislation has also been introduced in both chambers of Congress. I am a cosponsor of the Cormorant Relief Act, legislation introduced by Senator Cotton that would allow fish farmers to manage the double-crested cormorants targeting their farms.

 

Fish farmers and ranchers need additional tools to defend their livestock and their livelihood. They shouldn’t have to suffer additional financial losses. We can provide reasonable and responsible rules for effective avian predator management.

 

11-29-19 12:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

November 29, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The legislature created the Arkansas Trauma System 10 years ago, with passage of Act 393 of 2009.

 

The trauma system directs emergency responders to the closest hospital that provides the care needed by the trauma victim. That is not always the closest hospital.

 

It’s possible that an ambulance carrying a severely injured person would need to bypass a level four facility, in order to more quickly arrive at a level one facility that can immediately treat the trauma.

 

There are 62 facilities in the system. Six are level one, four are level two, 18 are level three and 34 are level four.

 

The six level one systems can handle the most severe trauma cases. Two are in Little Rock, two are in Memphis and two are in Springfield, Missouri. The level two hospitals are in Little Rock, Springfield, Hot Springs and Fayetteville.

 

The levels do not indicate the quality of care provided by the hospital. It indicates the resources available, for example, whether or not they have a neurologist on call.

 

Establishing the trauma system involved much more than coordinating emergency response teams with the closest hospital that offers appropriate care. The system has distributed grants to hospitals and firms that provide emergency medical services. More than 7,000 nurses have been trained in trauma care over the past 10 years.

 

For anyone who has suffered a traumatic injury, the system has possibly saved their life. Studies indicate that the Arkansas trauma system has lowered the mortality rate for traumatic injuries in Arkansas by 50 percent since 2009.

 

In many cases the system has made care more accessible and convenient for victims and their families. For example, since 2009 the trauma system has evaluated 3,565 burn cases, and one percent of the victims are now transferred out of state for further treatment. Ten years ago 12 percent of burn victims needed to be transferred out of state.

 

Hospitals and public health agencies maintain extremely complex medical records, such as images of X-rays and ultrasounds. The trauma image repository can send images to a facility, before the arrival of the patient, to eliminate the need for duplicate testing and to speed treatment.

 

Arkansas was one of the last states in the country to set up a statewide trauma system, but it’s now the first and only state to operate an ongoing “preventable mortality review.” More than 820 trauma cases have been closely reviewed, with the goal of improving care by streamlining protocols practiced by health care providers, and requiring that trauma care guidelines be more rigorous.

 

The trauma system has purchased 611 radios that operate under the Arkansas Wireless Information Network. The radios allow ambulances to stay in communication with emergency rooms in areas where there is no cell phone service, and in periods when cell service is down. This is vitally important should a natural disaster occur, or an event that affects massive numbers of people in a large area.

 

The Arkansas Trauma System is operated out of the state Health Department. On a regular basis it reports to the Senate Committee on Public Health, Welfare and Labor.

 

11-29-19 9:38 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Nov. 27, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below for fishing information from that area.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

11-27-19 8:03 p.m. KAWX.ORG

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Thanksgiving Day And Weekend Activities At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

 

Thanksgiving Day at Queen Wilhelmina State Park there will be games, puzzles, cards and coloring upstairs in the conference room while guests wait patiently for a table. There will also be complementary coffee and hot chocolate in the conference room. Scroll down to the bottom of this article to see the menu and details about the Thanksgiving Day special in the restaurant.

 

Friday is the annual Green Friday event when guests are encouraged to have a family day at the park and to skip the crazy chaotic mess of black Friday shopping. Are you looking for a relaxing way to spend the Friday after Thanksgiving away from all the hustle and bustle of the holiday shopping? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will lead you on four guided hikes. For more information about Thanksgiving Day activities or the weekend activities below, call the park office at (479) 394-2863 or visit the park's website by clicking here.

 

 

Friday, November 29th

Nature Hike starting at 8:00 am and lasting about 1.5 hours. Meet on the North Side of Lovers Leap.

 

Join Park Interpreter Melissa for an invigorating afternoon hike down Lovers Leap Trail. There are trees we can identify, and we’ll possibly see some wildlife. Meet at the north side of Lovers Leap trailhead just below the lodge parking lot.

 

 

Reservoir Hike starting at 11:00 am and lasting about 1 hour 15 minutes. Meet at the Reservoir Trailhead.

 

Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a hike to what used to be the old water system for the 1898 hotel.

 

Spring Trail Hike starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater.

 

Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a leisure stroll on this short trail. Terrain is easy, so we will take our time and enjoy what nature has to offer us.

 

Ouachita Walk starting at 3:15 pm and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet on the west side of the Ouachita Trailhead.

 

Join Park Interpreter Melissa and enjoy a serene fall walk on top of the mountain to catch a glimpse of the changes the season brings with it. This will be an easy hike for all ages.

 

Saturday, November 30th

Tree ID Hike starting at 11:15 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet on the north side of Lovers’ Leap Trail.

 

Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take a stroll on the Lovers’ Leap Trail and identify the trees along the way.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

 

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Tree Cookie Necklaces starting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.

 

What is a tree cookie? Want to remember your visit to Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we discover the unique qualities of tree cookies and create tree cookie necklace to take home!

 

Black Bears starting at 7:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.

 

Do we have bears here at Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to find out if these once almost extinct animals live near the park.

 

Sunday, December 1st

Wonder House Tour starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

 

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.

 

Silent Hike starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour and 30 minutes. Meet at the north Side of Lovers’ Leap Trail.

 

Have you ever been on a trail and never seen an animal? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we hike silently down to the Lovers’ Leap platform. Along the way we will observe what we can see and hear as we silently walk through the woods.

 

Bird Bingo starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.

 

This is not your ordinary bingo game. In this game of bingo, you will learn about the birds of Arkansas. If you are interested in birds, then you will enjoy this game. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun filled game of Bingo.

 

11-27-19 11:29 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Search Underway For Missing Mena Area Resident

 
UPDATE: The body of the missing person, David Danley, has been located in a wooded area near his home and his next of kin has been notified, according to Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer. 
11-27-19 3:00 p.m. 
 
Polk County authorities launched a search early Wednesday morning for a Mena area man missing since Monday night or Tuesday morning.
 
Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer identified the missing person as David Danley, age 76, who resides on Polk County Road 76 East between Mena and Acorn.
 
Sheriff Sawyer said the man may be on a Yamaha ATV.
 
Crews are searching on foot, with ATVs, and by airplane Wednesday morning.
 
Anyone with information that might be helpful to authorities should contact the Polk County Sheriff's Department at (479) 394-2511.
 
11-27-19 8:17 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
To listen to the Polk County, Arkansas Online Police and Fire Scanner, click on the scanner below. Please listen responsibly! 

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Quorum Court Approves $11.6 Million Polk County 2020 Budget, Other Business

 
The Polk County Quorum Court met Tuesday night for their regular monthly session with Judge Brandon Ellison presiding. All eleven Justices of The Peace were present, as other elected officials and guests.
 
In addition to routine business, the JPs passed an ordinance to levy 2019 millage rates. The millage rates are voted on by voters, so the annual ordinance, while required, is more of a recognition of the rates by the Court than approval. There was also an ordinance approved that will allow the County to set up a special fund for accounting of a motor fuel tax that will come from the State and can only be used for certain things, by legislative action, necessitating the extra accounting.
 
The 2020 Polk County Budget, which had been discussed at the previous Quorum Court Meeting and a Budget and Finance Committee Meeting, totaling $11,600,537.83 was approved unanimously.
 
There were no comments from the public.
 
The December Quorum Court Meeting will be held on December 23, 2019 at 6:00 p.m., a day earlier than normal to avoid meeting on Christmas Eve.
 
Quorum Court meetings are open to the public.
 
11-27-19 7:47 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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November Polk County Sales Tax Report

 

Polk County Treasurer Tanya K. Fretz has released the November 2019 Sales Tax General and Road Improvement Sales Tax Reports, both 1% taxes on retail sales.

 

The amounts reflect collections for the previous month.?

 

The total for each was $124,293.71, a $6,472.92 increase for each compared to the same period in 2018.


To date the taxes have generated $1,394,706 each, a $41,686 increase compared to the same period in 2018.


The Road Improvement Sales Tax can only be used for road maintenance and construction in the county.

 

11-26-19 4:14 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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Why Is Chick-Fil-A Being Grilled?

 

This past week, the Chick-fil-A Foundation issued a statement saying it had revised its giving priorities. Taken at face value, the meaning of that press release was clear: "Going forward, the Chick-fil-A Foundation will focus its giving toward key organizations that address education, homelessness and hunger."

The practical implications, however, were not clear. What did this mean for groups like the Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, which the Foundation had most recently supported in 2018? Many have wondered why the Salvation Army was left out of this round of giving, particularly given its commitment to the Foundation's stated priorities.

The mainstream media gleefully concluded that Chick-fil-A had succumbed to pressure from LGBTQ advocacy groups and others, and declared that the restaurant chain would no longer be awarding grants to "anti-LGBTQ" entities. This, despite the fact that the Chick-fil-A Foundation expressly stated that future grant recipients "could include faith-based and non-faith-based charities."

Based on the media's reporting, a predictable outcry occurred among ministry leaders and outraged Christians around the nation. If Chick-fil-A does intend to discontinue making grants to ministry entities such as the Salvation Army and Fellowship of Christians Athletes, it could impact the patronage of millions of customers who have long supported Chick-fil-A's commitment to Biblical principles. But is that truly what the fast food chain meant to convey?

That was the question asked by Rev. Franklin Graham to Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A. Graham then issued the following report:

"I picked up the phone and called Dan Cathy. Dan was very clear that they have not bowed down to anyone's demands, including the LGBTQ community. They will continue to support whoever they want to support. They haven't changed who they are or what they believe. Chick-fil-A remains committed to Christian values. Dan Cathy assured me that this isn't going to change. I hope all those who jumped to the wrong conclusion about them read this."

We are comforted by Dan Cathy's assurance that Chick-fil-A hasn't changed and isn't going to change. But what then was intended by the corporate announcement last week? It told readers that a change in policy had occurred. What was it really? JDFI and conservative Christians across the nation are awaiting further clarification.

 

11-25-19 9:39 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report for November 17th - 23rd

 

 

Reports from November 17, 2019 through November 23, 2019 

 

 

November 17 and 18, 2019

A local man reported a theft of gasoline.  Case is pending location and interview of suspect.

A local business owner reported that a wrench and tires had been stolen from his building.  Case is pending.

Report was made of a neighbor’s dog killing chickens.  The owner was warned to keep his dog inside or tethered if he is outdoors.

 

November 19, 2019

Michael Jamison, 44, was charged with criminal assault and fleeing.  The arrest followed a call from a local retail store.

Sarah Mitchell, 35, of Mena was served nine warrants.  The arrest followed a call from a Mena resident.

 

November 20, 2019

David Eledge, was charged with several warrants.  Arrest followed a call for a disabled vehicle at a   local convenience store.

 

November 21, 2019

Kaleb Rushin, 18, of Mena was arrested and served am outstanding warrant following a call from a Mena resident.

 

November 22 & 23, 2019

Tristan Chaney, 24, of Mena was charged with criminal trespass after officers responded to a call at a local retail store.

Elizabeth Finley, 20, of Mena was charged with possession of a controlled substance.

Nathaniel Riley, 26, of Mena was charged with driving on a suspended license.

Michael Wing, 32, of Mena was charged with public intoxication.

 

11-25-19 2:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

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Quorum Court Meets Tuesday

 

The Polk County Quorum Court will meet Tuesday, November 26, 2019 for their regular monthly meeting.

 
In addition to routine business, the following are on the meeting agenda:
 
 
     Consideration of an ordinance to adopt the 2020 Budget
 
     Consideration of an ordinance to levy 2019 millage rates
 
     Consideration of an ordinance to establish an additional motor fuel tax fund and declare and emergency (this is not a new tax, only a fund for accounting purposes).
 
 
The meeting will start at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday and be held in the Quorum Court Meeting Room at the Polk County Office Complex (old hospital) on pine Street in Mena.
 
Quorum Court meetings are open to the public.
 
11-25-19 7:22 a.m. KAWX.ORG

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Christmas Time's A Comin' To Mena and Polk County

 

It’s that time of year when downtown Mena transforms into a place of wonder and magic for children and adults alike with our Annual Mena Christmas Parade of Lights. Come join the fun as The Mena Polk County Chamber of Commerce kicks off the holiday season with the “North Pole Christmas” themed parade.

 

The magical and lively parade will make its way down Mena Street on Saturday, December 7th at 6pm, continuing on to Oak Avenue, DeQueen Street, Hwy 71 South and 7th Avenue, ending at Historic Janssen Park. You’ll see hundreds of smiling faces along the spectacular one-mile parade route as they delight in the sights and sounds of the season. Christmas themed entries will include illuminated and brightly decorated floats, marching bands, equestrian units, and non-profit groups. This is Mena’s biggest and brightest parade, making it a holiday favorite you won’t want to miss.

 

 

Pete Chambers, 2018 Volunteer of the Year, will be proudly leading the parade as our esteemed Grand Marshall. Pete won't be the only star of the show because Santa Claus is coming to town! Santa has marked his calendar to make a special appearance in Mena, Arkansas. For kids young and old, visions of jolly Ol’St.Nick mark the true beginning of the season and provide a fitting close to the night’s parade.

 

There will be a contest for the floats and entries with the best interpretation of the theme: “North Pole Christmas.” Parade attendees can cast their votes on the Mena/Polk County Chamber of Commerce Facebook page the night of the parade. Announcements of winners will be made at the Christmas Festival in Janssen Park following the parade. Candy and other goodies will be tossed to onlookers in this family-friendly holiday event.

We encourage everyone to line the parade route, fill the sidewalks, bring your chairs or sit along the curbs to enjoy the show. A few safety reminders for parade onlookers: We ask parents to help ensure the safety of the children and please do not allow them to go into the street during the parade while trying to retrieve candy and goodies. Walking Candy Tossers are encourage to “toss to the curb” in efforts to help. We also have to ask that you do not park any vehicles along the parade route, as this limits and blocks the viewing area of the parade. We truly appreciate your assistance in making this a wonderful and family-friendly event.

 

Be sure to follow Santa and the parade to Janssen Park for the Christmas Festival and Concert complete with Fireworks Show, and then close the evening with the official lighting of Janssen Park.

 

The Merriment of Mena Christmas Lights and Display Contest will also continue this year. Local businesses across Mena are encouraged to make it the brightest and most beautiful Christmas ever by going all in on their Christmas decorating. Two winners will be chosen and there is no entry fee.

 

 

Simply fill out a registration form and have your display completed by November 29th to be considered for judging. Forms are available through the Chamber of Commerce. Your participation is paramount in making Mena a destination for viewing Christmas lights.

 

Parade line up begins at 5:30p.m. We will be gathering and staging the parade behind the Old Middle School building directly across from the Courthouse. Please utilize the parking lot next to The Crossing church as well as the field and parking lot behind the school building. In addition, floats are encouraged to park on 9th Street and Port Arthur after the conclusion of the parade so the crowds can get a closer look at the hard work that goes into each one. Anyone wishing to participate in the parade MUST turn in a completed registration form to the Chamber office no later than Thursday, December 5th. Forms can be found at menapolkchamber.com, at the chamber office, or call 479-394-2912 for additional details.

 

11-23-19 12:22 p.m. KAWX.ORG

 

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Dewey Floyd Carroll Obituary

Dewey Floyd Carroll age 68 of Hatfield, Arkansas passed away Thursday, October 3, 2019 in Hot Springs, Arkansas.

He was born on December 28, 1950 in Johnson City, New York to the late Dewey Charles Carroll and the late Ada Ross Carroll. Dewey was married to Marie Barnes Carroll until his passing. He was a truck driver and carpenter by profession. He also was talented with leather, making rodeo gear. Dewey enjoyed hunting and fishing with family and friends. Above all he loved his family and grandchildren and would always say, “I love you to the moon and back!” He was a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend to all who knew him. He will be dearly missed by all.

He is survived by wife: Marie Carroll of Hatfield, Arkansas

Sons: Rick Carroll of New York, Jason Neer of Mena, Arkansas, Josh Neer of Hatfield, Arkansas, and Eric Fairless of Hatfield, Arkansas

Daughters: Bonnie Carroll of New York, Darlene Marcum of New York and Linda Neer of Mena, Arkansas

Many grandchildren and several great-grandchildren

Sister: Bonnie Bergman of New York.

He was preceded in death by his parents, a brother Charles Carroll and a grandson Dante Carroll.
 
Mr. Carroll was sent for cremation under the direction of the Beasley-Wood Funeral Home of Mena.

Memorial service will be Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at Hatfield Freewill Baptist Church in Hatfield, Arkansas.
 

 

11-22-19 6:12 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena City Council Special Called Meeting Monday, November 25th

 

There will be a special called Mena City Council meeting on Monday, November 25, 2019 at 12:00 p.m. in City Hall.

 
The City Council Finance Committee will meet first to discuss the 2020 budget.
 
Agenda items include:
 
Consider a Resolution approving a proposed Consent Administrative Order Amendment with the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality reference actions necessary to complete a collection system rehabilitation plan for the Mena Wastewater Treatment Facility and authorizing the Mayor and City Clerk/Treasurer to execute the order on behalf of the City of Mena
 
Discuss a final loan payment to USDA Rural Development Administration
 
Announcements/Correspondence.
 
The next regular City Council meeting will be December 10, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. in City Hall.
 
City Council meetings are open to the public.
 
11-22-19 5:47 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Federal Grant Assists with the Gift of Reading

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Federal Grant Assists with the Gift of Reading
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Arkansas a $38 million grant to improve literacy in the state, and today I’d like to talk about the benefits to Arkansas.
 
And it starts with a simple fact: Reading changes everything.
 
Literacy is not just another choice in life. For students who fail to develop high-level reading skills, life will always be a struggle. If our young people are going to reach their goals and dreams, they must know how to read.
 
During my five years in office, I have encouraged educators to create a culture of reading. This federal grant rewards and acknowledges the progress we’ve made. The money also helps us move closer to building that culture of reading.
 
Arkansas received the maximum amount allowed under the five-year grant. The state Department of Education will be able to fund reading projects with this $38 million to districts around the state. Our goal is to improve literacy at all levels of school, from preschool through the 12th grade.
 
The department will use the money to implement the Arkansas Comprehensive Literacy State Development Program. The goal of the program is to provide Arkansas children access to quality education, to improve the skills of teachers who teach reading, to strengthen literacy instruction, and my favorite goal, to create a culture of reading.
 
The department will receive the first $1.1 million of the grant this year. With the grant money, we will further increase our efforts to reach children who are living in poverty, children who aren’t fluent in English, and children with disabilities.
 
The rate of literacy in Arkansas has improved since 2017 when we launched the statewide reading initiative we named R.I.S.E., or the Reading Initiative for Student Excellence.
 
With this grant, we will expand our current programs and provide new resources that will reach even more students.
 
I am grateful for the grant, and I am proud the U.S. Department of Education is aware of our efforts to improve literacy and reading instruction.
 
Since we launched R.I.S.E., more than 6,000 teachers kindergarten through sixth grade have trained at R.I.S.E. Academies, and more than 3,000 teachers kindergarten through the 12th grade have received intensive training in the science of reading, or phonics.
 
Through the grant, we will provide books to families through a partnership with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library. The education department will increase the number of R.I.S.E. activities at the pre-K level.
 
Many aspects of our state’s success depend on the collective strength of our reading skill. But it is also a personal matter for me. I love to read. When I was a boy, I checked out the Hardy Boys books from the library in Gravette. I love to read history books, and I have learned much about leadership from books I have read. The First Lady and I passed our love of reading down to our children and grandchildren. As governor, I want to pass that legacy along to all Arkansans.
 
This $38 million grant will go a long way in helping us to give the gift of reading to our students.
 
11-22-19 5:17 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
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US Marshals, Polk County Deputies Return Chad Voelkel To Polk County

Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer announced today that Chad Voelkel is back in the Polk County Detention Center. Chad Voelkel was extradited from Canada and flown to XNA Airport in Bentonville Friday by the US Marshal’s Service. The Polk County Sheriff’s Office took custody of Chad Voelkel and returned him to Mena to await trial on Rape and Failure to Appear.


Chad Voelkel was arrested for Rape by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office on January 3rd, 2019. He was out on bond and scheduled for a jury trial on May 23rd, 2019. When Voelkel failed to appear for his jury trail, a warrant was issued for Failure to Appear.


It was quickly determined that Voelkel had fled the area with his wife, Stephanie Voelkel, and 4 of his minor children. A warrant was issued for Stephanie Voelkel for Permitting Abuse of a Minor.


The Voelkels were located and arrested on July 10, 2019 by Canadian authorities in the Portage la Prairie area of Manitoba, Canada. The 4 Voelkel children were turned over to Arkansas Department of Human Services shortly after their parent’s arrest.


Stephanie Voelkel is still in Canadian custody awaiting extradition to Polk County to face charges of Permitting the Abuse of a Minor.


Sheriff Sawyer stated that he would like to thank his Deputies and the US Marshal’s Service for their hard work and dedication on this case. “Without the involvement of the US Marshal’s Service, we might still be looking for them”. Sheriff Sawyer also wanted to thank US Attorney Dak Kees, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Canadian Border Services, the Arkansas Department of Human Services, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children for their assistance. “This was a team effort. Everyone involved was focused on finding the Voelkel children and making sure that Chad and Stephanie Voelkel were brought back to face justice.”

 

11-22-19 4:33 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

As we approach Thanksgiving, it’s important that we show our gratitude to our farmers.  A thanksgiving feast would not be the same without the contribution of Arkansas agriculture.

 

Arkansas ranks 5th in the nation in turkey production. In 2018, 595,350 pounds of turkey were produced in Arkansas poultry farms. In fact, turkey production creates more than 14,000 jobs in the state.

 

Arkansas is also the 5th largest producer of sweet potatoes. There were 4,800 acres of sweet potatoes harvested last year.

 

Although few go shopping for actual soybeans for Thanksgiving, there is a very good chance the soybean plays a significant part in your feast.  This year Arkansas ranked as 11th in the nation in soybean production.

 

Soybean oil is used in cooking and frying foods.  Margarine is a product made from soybean oil.  Salad dressings and mayonnaises are made with soybean oil.  It is also used for animal feed for farm animals.

 

And don’t forget about the rice. Whether mixed with broccoli and cheese or butternut squash, this side dish most likely began its journey on an Arkansas farm.  More than 40% of all rice in the United States is grown in our state.

 

Arkansas farmers may have contributed to your dessert menu as well, especially when it comes to the pies.

 

We are one of 15 states to grow pecans. There were more than 15,000 acres of pecans harvested in Arkansas last year. And while we are proud to be home to many pumpkin patches across the state, we do not produce enough to support every supermarket.  Arkansas pumpkins however can be found at your local farmers markets or pumpkin patch.

 

With 42,500 farms in our state, farmers are the backbone to our economy. Arkansas consistently ranks in the top one-third of the nation for agricultural cash farm receipts.

 

Rain or shine, our farmers work early mornings and late nights.

 

So this holiday season, thank a farmer.  And look for the “Arkansas Grown” label at your local supermarket as another way to show your appreciation.

 

11-22-19 4:14 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Giving Thanks and Showing Gratitude: An Opportunity and Privilege

 

Once again, the holiday season has quietly and rapidly descended upon us. Arkansans are getting into the holiday spirit and preparing to share meals and extended time with their loved ones. We will also be looking for ways to give back and pay it forward.

 

Thanksgiving’s history within our nation is rich, if not complex. While claims of communal meals centered around fellowship and thanks date back to the 1500s, the tradition that epitomizes the concept of a traditional Thanksgiving meal occurred in 1621 in New England.

 

That year, pilgrim settlers in Plymouth Colony celebrated their first successful harvest alongside the Native Americans who assisted them in learning how to cultivate the land in the New World. Depictions of Pilgrims and Native Americans gathered together to share in an abundance of food and gratitude are inescapable. Ever since, the idea of assembling for the specific purpose of showing gratefulness while breaking bread has been a hallmark of American life in some shape or form.

 

The first president of the United States, George Washington took the recommendation of Congress to call for a national day of Thanksgiving in 1789. He spoke of “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God.” Later, even amid the turmoil of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln would proclaim a national day of Thanksgiving, declaring it “fit and proper” to be “solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged” that our country had been the beneficiary of gracious gifts from on high.

 

More recently, President Ronald Reagan described Thanksgiving as “a day Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate” and extolled the spirit of voluntary giving that was “ingrained in America,” while President George W. Bush once surprised American troops serving in Iraq on the holiday in 2003 to eat with them and extend his encouragement and gratitude on behalf of the American people for their courage and sacrifice.

 

Each of these moments, and countless others, shows how Americans innately possess a desire to pause and give thanks for the many blessings and opportunities afforded to us. And while time spent with loved ones enjoying delicious food and treasured fellowship are a staple of this holiday, it has also come to serve as a reminder of the privilege we have to give back.

 

Whether it’s serving food to the hungry, collecting and distributing toys or clothing to those in need or finding other ways to aid our communities, Thanksgiving and the holiday season has come to represent not just thankfulness, but also service.

 

As my former football coach Frank Broyles constantly reminded my teammates and me, “There are two types of people: givers and takers. Be a giver.” We certainly do our share of taking during the holiday season, but I think Coach Broyles would be proud of how so many citizens also take the opportunity to make a positive contribution to the benefit of friends and strangers alike.

 

One way we’re doing that in Washington is by hosting a food drive to benefit a local food bank. The bipartisan Senate Hunger Caucus, which I co-chair, is leading this nonpartisan initiative to help the hungry. And I’m encouraging Arkansans to find similar ways to serve their neighbors and give back close to home during this season and year-round.

 

Thanksgiving is a wonderful time of year. It helps us remember what we’ve been blessed to receive, often times undeservingly. This day of gratitude and thanks also makes us pause and reflect on what we have and how we can use our time and resources to help others. I’m eager to see how Arkansans answer that call this holiday season, and I wish all in the Natural State a happy Thanksgiving.

 

11-22-19 3:44 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

November 22, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas is one of 16 states whose legislators are working to help families gain access to medical care for a debilitating disorder that can afflict children after a bout of strep throat.

 

It is a neuroimmune disorder commonly known as PANDAS, which stands for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections. Symptoms may include trouble sleeping, loss of math skills and handwriting skills and severe separation anxiety.

 

Some parents have reported that the symptoms became so severe that they had difficulty recognizing their child.

 

Related to PANDAS is pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, known as "PANS." It is a clinically defined disorder characterized by the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive symptoms or eating restrictions, accompanied by two or more symptoms of acute behavioral deterioration or motor and sensory changes.

 

Antibiotics and psychiatric care can relieve the severity of the symptoms, but they can be very costly. A foundation that supports families who have been afflicted says that medicine can cost from $5,000 to $17,000 per dose.

 

Consistent health insurance coverage is important for affected families, due to the high cost of treatment. With that in mind, the legislature approved Act 878 of 2019, which takes steps to make health coverage in Arkansas inconsistent.

 

The act creates a panel of health care professionals, educators, insurance representatives and elected officials. Under Act 878 the panel will report to the joint Senate and House Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committees at its December meeting.

 

A similar panel created by Texas lawmakers issued its first report in September.

 

The report will include standards for diagnosing and treating PANS and PANDAS. When the standards are in place, health insurance companies can use them to set coverage amounts. According to language in Act 878, legislation that mandates coverage will be considered at the next regular session.

 

The act encourages the governor to include mandatory insurance coverage on the call of a special session, if he calls a special session before the 2021 regular session convenes.

 

Act 878 also charges the panel of health and insurance experts with raising awareness, in schools, in health clinics and among families. According to support groups, the disorder is often misdiagnosed.

 

Robocalls

 

Act 677 of 2019 prohibits fraudulent telemarketers from using technology that makes your phone’s caller ID display a fake number. It passed through both chambers of the legislature without a dissenting vote. Judging by the enthusiasm with which lawmakers voted for it, it may have been the most popular bill considered during the 2019 session.

 

This year alone, 35 states have considered more than 150 bills or resolutions to restrict robocalls, and enacted 25 of them. The Federal Communications Commission has issued regulations that allow phone companies to do more to block robocalls. The Commission estimates that in the past six years more than 14,700 people have lost $72 million in fraudulent phone scams.

 

An estimated 4.5 billion robocalls were placed to Americans in September, which is more than 150 million calls a day. Of those, 46 percent were scams, 12 percent were telemarketing calls from legitimate companies, 23 percent were alerts and reminders, and 19 percent were payment reminders.

 

11-22-19 9:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Resident Dies In Thursday Evening Montgomery County Crash

 

One person was killed and another injured Thursday night as the result of a two vehicle accident on State Highway 88 near Pine Ridge in Montgomery County just after 6:00 p.m.


According to the Arkansas State Police, 74 year old Judith Fast, a passenger in one of the vehicles, was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

The driver, 79 year old Jackie Fast, also of Mena, was transported to Mena Regional Health System by ambulance. 

 

The vehicle the deceased and injured were in was struck head on when the second vehicle traveled left of center striking it.

 

The driver of the second vehicle was not identified.

 

The accident was investigated by Sergeant Jorge Oseguera of the Arkansas State Police. 

 

11-22-19 6:50 a.m. KAWX.ORG

 

 

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ARDOT To Thanksgiving Travelers: Know Before You Go!

 

The Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT) reminds drivers to “know before you go” and visit IDriveArkansas.com before traveling during this Thanksgiving Holiday.

 

Extensive highway improvements continue through the state. With those improvements come work zones. To aid in your holiday travel, ARDOT has been working hard to open as many lanes as possible. Still, travelers will likely face work zones and possible delays due to increased traffic volume.

 

Overall travel volume for the holiday is expected to rise 2.9% over last year, according to the American Automobile Association (AAA). The AAA predicts that more than 49 million Americans will travel by automobile between Wednesday, November 27 and Sunday, December 1.

 

To help motorists find ways around accidents and work zone backups on Interstates, ARDOT has an Alternate Routes feature on IDriveArkansas.com. It displays linkages between the Interstate corridors and secondary routes that motorists may consider when travel is delayed. You can also follow us on Twitter @myARDOT.

 

11-21-19 6:41 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

For Mena and Polk County, Arkansas weather, visit KAWX.ORG or dial (479) 394-5600. To listen to Mena NOAA Weather Radio, click on the Weather Radio below or download a free Mena Weather Radio app from the App Store or Google Play.

 

 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Nov. 20, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below where you would like fishing information for. 

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

11-20-19 5:18 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Fire Department Quickly Extinguishes Laundry Room Fire At Limetree Inn

The Mena Fire Department was paged out to a fire at the Limetree Inn in Mena Wednesday afternoon. The fire was contained to the laundry facility.

 

For video click here.

 
Captain Tom Hairston said the fire started in a dryer and that damage was limited to the dryer and the one beside it.
 
 
There were no injuries and no damage to the structure.
 
In addition to the Mena Fire Department, Southwest EMS and the Mena Police Department responded.
 
 
11-20-19 5:03 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena School Board Holds November Meeting

 

The Mena School Board met for the regular November meeting on Tuesday evening.

 

The board began by approving the minutes from the September & October meetings.

 

They quickly moved to passing a disclosure statement for board member Kyle Cannon who is also an employee of the Union Bank of Mena.

 

A proposal was made to change the district employees vision plan. Mena Insurance currently holds the contract through Superior Vision. The new plan offered by Mena Insurance would be through Blue Cross & Blue Shield at a lower cost to employees and an increase in benefits. The change was passed by the board & will go into effect February 1, 2020.

 

Next was the approval of the financial reports for September & October.

 

Resignations were accepted by the board including Carol Sproles, Michaela VanPelt, David Goodner, & Howard Elliot.

 

The board approved an addendum to the contract of Cheryl Goodner, additional hours to Keri Duer, and a transfer of duties for Alicia Moody.

 

Superintendent Benny Weston presented a plan to restructure current Mena School District custodial employees & outsource the needed evening janitorial shifts. The board approved accepting a bid from SG360 for only the evening janotorial shifts at Louise Durham Elementary & Holly Harshman Elementary.

 

(Source: Mena Public Schools Facebook Page.)

11-20-19 11:09 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Finance Committee Meeting at City Hall Today

The Mena City Council Finance Committee will meet at 4:00 pm today (November 19, 2019), in City Hall, to discuss the proposed 2020 Budget.

 

The meeting is open to the public.

 

11-19-19 10:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Sheriff's Report for November 11th - 17th

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of November 11 – November 17, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


November 11, 2019
Report from a business on Highway 71 South in Cove of the theft of $20 in motor fuel.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Polk 54 near Mena of damage done to a vehicle by an acquaintance.  All parties refused to press charges.
Report of a disturbance on N Eve Street in Mena.  Deputies responded.  One of the subjects was escorted from the residence for the evening.


November 12, 2019
Arrested by an officer with Arkansas Game & Fish was Timothy R. Arthur, 47, of Cove, on a Charge of Resisting Arrest and Citations for Game & Fish Hunting Violations.


November 13, 2019
Report of suspicious behavior on Polk 7 near Wickes led to the arrest of Jon B. Wilson, 40, of Hot Springs, on Charges of Theft by Receiving and Criminal Trespass, and Probation/Parole and Garland County Warrants.  Also arrested was Davina S. Baker, 38, of Hot Springs, on Charges of Theft by Receiving and Criminal Trespass.


November 14, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 277 near Cove of the theft and fraudulent use of a debit card, totaling losses at $144.90.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


November 15, 2019
Report of a disturbance on 7th Street in Wickes led to the arrest of Guadalupe H. Gomez, 44, of Wickes, on Charges of Possession of Firearm by Certain Person and Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance.


November 16, 2019
Report from complainant on Deshong Lane near Cherry Hill of the theft of two chickens, valued at $20.00.  Investigation continues.


November 17, 2019
Traffic stop led to the arrest of Dana D. Long, 42, of Hatfield, on a Warrant for Violation of the Arkansas Hot Check Law.
Report from complainant on Polk 67 near Big Fork of damage done to a bulldozer.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Shady Grove of being threatened by an acquaintance.  Deputy responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.

Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked one vehicle accident this week.


Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 25 Incarcerated Inmates , with 16 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

 

PC19-00811

 

11-19-19 10:01 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Arkansas Law Enforcement Upping Patrols During Thanksgiving Travel Period

THANKSGIVING TRAVELS NEAR OR FAR; LAW ENFORCEMENT WILL BE ON THE ROAD TO ENFORCE CLICK OR TICKET LAW

The number of Thanksgiving holiday travelers will begin to grow starting this weekend as millions of Americans hit the road, eager to spend time with friends and family in places near and far.  It’s one of the busiest holiday travel periods every year, and unfortunately more people on the roadways means there is a greater potential for an increase in traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities.

   During the Thanksgiving holiday, Arkansas law enforcement officers from local, county and state departments are teaming up with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) on a high-visibility Click It or Ticket enforcement campaign set to begin Monday, November 25th and continuing through Sunday, December 1st.  The goal is to reduce the number of fatalities that occur when drivers and passengers fail to buckle up.  If you’re spotted not buckled up by Arkansas State Troopers or other law enforcement officers, you risk getting a ticket.

   The Click It or Ticket campaign is designed to save lives by making sure all Arkansas drivers and passengers get the message to wear their seat belts. The campaign combines powerful messages about seat belt safety with stepped-up patrols by law enforcement officers, many of them working exclusively to identify seat belt law violators.

   In addition to patrolling all U.S. and state two-lane highways, Arkansas State Troopers will participate in an intensified enforcement operation along Interstate 40 during the most heavily traveled hours of the Thanksgiving holiday from 10 AM to 10 PM on Wednesday, November 27th and Sunday, December 1st.

   During the 2017 Thanksgiving travel period (6 PM, Wednesday, November 22nd, until 5:59 AM, Monday, November 27th), 365 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes nationwide. Evening hours proved to be the most deadly with 57 percent of crashes occurring during nighttime hours.

   “Wearing a seat belt is the single most effective precaution drivers and passengers can take to prevent injury or death as the result of a motor vehicle crash,” says Colonel Bill Bryant, Director of the Arkansas State Police and Governor’s Highway Safety Representative.

   “Too many drivers and their passengers choose to ignore the facts and don’t comply with the state’s primary seat belt law,” Colonel Bryant said.  “Tragically, this decision leads to an increase in injuries and deaths on the highway.”

   Colonel Bryant reminds drivers, “Whether you’re driving cross-country or across the street, you must wear your seat belt and it may prove to be the life or death difference for you and your family."

   NHTSA estimates that proper seat belt use reduces the risk of fatal injury to front seat passengers by 45 percent, and the risk of moderate to serious injury by 50 percent. In 2016, approximately 14,668 people survived crashes because they were buckled up. If everyone had worn their seat belts that year, as many as 2,456 lives might have been saved.

   For more information about highway safety during the Thanksgiving holiday travel period, please visit www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov or call the Arkansas Highway Safety Office at (501) 618-8136.  For more on Arkansas’ ongoing Toward Zero Deaths campaign to eliminate preventable traffic fatalities, visit www.TZDArkansas.org.

 

11-19-19 8:00 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

To listen to the Mena - Polk County (Arkansas) Online Police and Fire Scanner, click on the scanner below. The Online Scanner is courtesy of Community Radio KAWX. Please listen responsibly!

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Mena Police Report for November 10th - 16th

Reports from November 10, 2019 through November 16, 2019 

 

November 10, 2019

Employees at a local convenience store reported that someone had left items on their parking lot.  Police have them at the police office until such time as the owner is found.

A local woman reported that her child’s father had not returned the child when he was scheduled to do so.  No charges have been filed.

 

November 11, 2019

Brandon Duncan, 29, of Smithville, was charged with shoplifting and possession of drug paraphernalia, and was served an outstanding warrant.  The arrest followed a call from a local retail store.

Angela Fults, 20, of Nashoba, Oklahoma was charged with possession of shoplifting and furnishing prohibited items to a public facility.  The arrest followed a call to a local retail store.

Travis Davis, 36, of Hatfield was served an outstanding warrant.

 

November 12, 2019

Report was made of a semi damaging a traffic light was made.  The driver was located and restitution for the damage is being taken care of by the owner of the truck.

April Poor, 40, of Mena was charged with possession of methamphetamine or cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia.  The arrest followed a traffic top.

 

November 13, 2019

A local woman reported that she is being harassed by her brother.  Case is pending.

 

November 14 & 15 & 16, 2019

A Mena man reported that he had received a scam call requesting personal information. Case is pending.

Report was taken regarding a Mena woman who reported that her brother and a friend had damaged her car.  Case is pending.

Case is pending on a local woman, who has had her debit card used without her permission or knowledge.  Case is pending further investigation.

 

11-18-19 10:56 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: For Better, Safer Roads in Arkansas

 
 
For Better, Safer Roads in Arkansas
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – The chance to renew the state’s half-cent sales tax to pay for highway upkeep will be the most important issue on the ballot next year, and today I’d like to talk about why I supported the legislation that will allow us to vote on Issue One.
 
Issue One does not increase taxes. The state has been collecting a half-cent sales tax for highway maintenance since 2013 after the voters approved it in 2012. The current half-cent sales tax is set to expire in 2023. Issue One allows us to extend it to pay for roads.
 
Roads and bridges are in constant need of maintenance, and upkeep is not cheap. Issue One will bring in more than $205 million annually to repair and improve nearly 7,000 miles of highways and to repair or replace dangerous bridges. It will bring in $43 million to go to cities and $43 million to go to counties. The rest of the $119 million will be used for state infrastructure.
 
Our roads, streets, and highways are crucial to so many areas of life. Our roads connect the four corners of Arkansas and allow us the freedom to travel almost anywhere we want to go.
 
We take the roads to our jobs, to the doctor, to school, and to the grocery store. Our roads take us to visit family and friends.
 
Agriculture is our Number One industry, and our farmers rely on safe roads to deliver their goods. Tourism is our second-largest industry. Our highways give Arkansans and visitors easy access to our mountains and our rivers and to the duck-hunting waters of the Delta.
 
When the leaders of a company are considering a move to Arkansas, the condition of our transportation system is one of their top criteria.
 
Over the years, this will cost billions of dollars. Issue One allows us to provide the funds for highway maintenance far into the future. Approval of this extension will mean that the money to fix our potholes and resurface our roads will be there when we need it. Renewal ensures stability for road funding. It also will give us a stronger hand when we apply for federal funds.
 
We all benefit from good roads. The half-cent sales tax allows everyone to easily share in the maintenance of our transportation infrastructure.
 
Issue One is the second part of a historic plan to pay for roads and highways. Earlier this year, members of the 92nd General Assembly approved $95 million for highway upkeep. Legislators, with my support, then approved this initiative for the 2020 ballot.
 
I joined legislators in wanting to give all Arkansans the chance to approve this extension. Passage of Issue One will mean safer roads around the state, and safe roads improve life for everyone.
 
11-15-19 5:25 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

This week we want to remind you of an important deadline approaching all Arkansans.


On October 1, 2020, anyone who boards a domestic flight or enters a federal building will either need a REAL ID driver’s license (DL) or Identification Card (ID) or will need to provide a regular identification and additional accepted forms of identification.


Arkansas is taking part in the federal nationwide initiative to improve the security of state-issued driver’s licenses and identification cards, which will help fight terrorism and reduce identity fraud.


The federal REAL ID Act of 2005 adopted the recommendations of the 911 Commission. The REAL ID Act prohibits the federal government from accepting driver's licenses or identification cards issued by states that do not meet the requirements of the REAL ID Act. This includes but is not limited to commercial air flights and federal buildings.


You can upgrade to REAL ID at any time by having a duplicate license issued at a REAL ID office. The following Revenue Offices issue the REAL ID: Arkadelphia, Batesville, Bentonville, Conway, El Dorado, Fayetteville, Forrest City, Fort Smith (6515 Phoenix Avenue), Greenwood, Harrison, Hot Springs (200 Woodbine), Jonesboro, Little Rock (Three State Police Plaza Drive), Little Rock (1900 W. 7th Street), Little Rock (9108 North Rodney Parham), Monticello, Mountain Home, Paragould, Russellville, Searcy, Sherwood, Springdale, Texarkana, West Memphis, and White Hall.


An individual applying for Real ID must provide more documentation than an individual applying for a regular driver’s license or State ID. The federal government requires Arkansans to confirm proof of residency, legal presence and identity and Social Security number through the following documentation:


Passport or birth certificate
Two proof of address documents such as utility bills or bank statements
Social Security card
Name change linking documents, example: Marriage Certificate, Divorce Decree, Court Order


The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration (DFA) recently launched a website, www.ar.gov/REALID, allowing Arkansans to list the documentation that will be presented at the Revenue Office to obtain a REAL ID. The website confirms the documents meet all requirements or specifies which document is missing.


The cost to obtain a REAL ID does not differ from the cost to obtain or renew a license or ID.


Close to 250,000 Arkansans have obtained a REAL ID, which is approximately ten percent of active licenses and IDs in the state.  Make plans to get yours soon!

 

11-15-19 4:58 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 

From Paris, France to Paris, Arkansas: Why Geographic Information Science Matters

 

 

For more than two hundred years the United States and France have maintained close, enduring relations. France is, in fact, our oldest ally and both nations stand as symbols of freedom of speech, freedom of thought and the broader concepts of liberty and democracy.

 

Given our strong bonds, Americans were understandably shocked and saddened when flames engulfed the 850-year old Notre Dame Cathedral in April. The beautiful gothic structure, with its stunning stained-glass windows and flying buttresses, is one of the world’s most well-known works of religious architecture. French President Emmanuel Macron has promised that it will be completely, and quickly, rebuilt. This is an ambitious goal, but the tools exist to help make it a reality.

 

The use of technology to aid in the restoration of Notre Dame was the focus of the Library of Congress’ annual Geographic Information Science (GIS) Day event. As a co-chair of the Senate French Caucus, I was honored to be invited to share some thoughts this subject.

 

It was a fascinating, timely topic given how GIS is already playing a key role in the rebuilding efforts. Drones were gathering data about the cathedral within 24 hours of the fire’s extinguishment, and these flights produced terrabytes of data, which were then analyzed and used to create hundreds of 360-degree panoramas of both the inside and outside of the church post-fire.

 

Even more fortuitous, a highly precise digital map of the cathedral’s pre-fire state also exists. In 2015, a historian compiled over one billion laser-measured points to help tell the cathedral’s story. That data should prove extremely useful in the reconstruction of the iconic building.

 

Cultural preservation is just one of the many uses for GIS. From aiding in highway design to coordinating disaster responses, advances in this technology have revolutionized the way in which decisions are made. In fact, there’s another Paris much closer to home where GIS is currently being put to good use.

 

Paris, Arkansas is one of the many communities along the Arkansas River that experienced significant damage as a result of this year’s historic flooding. The Arkansas Department of Transportation (ARDOT) conducted aerial photography during the peak flooding to aid recovery and restoration efforts among the state’s affected roads and highways, mapped flood impact to analyze property and economic loss and provided that information to inform state levee management decisions. ARDOT has made this imagery available to science, engineering, real estate and emergency planning communities to support improved decision making in the future.

 

My colleagues and I are committed to removing barriers to will help further unlock the potential of GIS. Last year, we took a step forward by including the Geospatial Data Act (GDA) of 2018 in the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization bill that President Trump signed into law.

 

It just so happens that one of the authors of the GDA Act of 2018 is none other than Arkansas’s Fourth District Congressman Bruce Westerman. He was gracious enough to join me for the Library of Congress event so he could share his expertise with the attendees.

 

GIS is a subject the event’s audience was well versed in, but one that most Americans know little about. Yet, as evidenced above, it is very important to all of our daily lives. The message Congressman Westerman and I delivered was that Washington will work to ensure that, as GIS policy is implemented, it will be done so in a thoughtful manner in order for it to continue improving our daily lives.

 

Ultimately, our goal is to expand the understanding and use of the data. We want the technology and data to allow governing to become more efficient and effective through its use. Unlocking the true capabilities of GIS will be win-win for us all.

 

11-15-19 4:53 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

November 15, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas has made a strong commitment to making sure that children learn to read at an early age, and the federal government has recognized our efforts with a grant of $38 million to improve literacy.

 

The money will be sent to Arkansas over the next five years. It is the highest amount possible in the category of literacy grants distributed by the U.S. Education Department.

 

The state began its statewide reading initiative in 2017, when the legislature approved Act 1063. Also known as the “Right to Read Act,” it requires more rigorous teacher training in the science of literacy, especially for elementary school teachers.

 

Legislators followed up with passage of Act 83 of 2019. It requires school districts to follow a specific plan for training teachers in the science of literacy, and the plan must be tailored to the district’s literacy needs.

 

The state will use the grant to strengthen its overall literacy instruction and build a culture of reading, with an emphasis on helping children who are disadvantaged. They may be living in poverty or they may have a disability or they may need extra help learning English.

 

The state Education Department has labeled its literacy program R.I.S.E. That stands for Reading Initiative for Student Excellence.

 

Since it began in 2017, more than 6,000 Arkansas teachers in K-6 have received training in literacy instruction, and more than 3,000 teachers in K-12 have gone through intensive training in the science of reading.

 

Phonics is a main component of the science of reading. The focus of R.I.S.E is to provide more explicit phonics instruction. One goal is to get away from predictable texts that have lots of pictures.

 

Instead, instruction will focus on decoding new words, teaching students to look at words and sound them out before relying on pictures for visual clues.

 

Parents are encouraged to help their children build up a vocabulary of “sight words,” which are frequent words that kids memorize, often with flash cards. Examples are “the” and “me” and “from.”

 

The latest research indicates that it’s better in the long run to teach children to decode the phonic parts of sight words, rather than simply memorizing them. That’s because they will then learn patterns that help them decode longer words and words that are seen infrequently.

 

Arkansas has partnered with experts at the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia to apply new scientific methods to our literacy programs.

 

As more research is completed and new methods are tested, schools will change their strategies to incorporate the most successful of them, always with the goal to improve students’ ability to learn.

 

In related news, 175 Arkansas schools will receive $6.7 million because their students scored in the top 5 percent and top 10 percent on standardized tests known as the ACT Aspire exams.

 

Schools also qualified for the rewards if their students showed significant improvement on the tests.

 

The amount that each school receives will depend on its enrollment. This year, a smaller school got $6,000 and a larger one received $90,000.

 

11-15-19 11:07 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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October Arkansas Lottery Ticket Sales Exceed $39 Million, $168,000 In Polk County

Lottery ticket sales in October 2019 totaled $39,185,152.50 in Arkansas.

 
The highest sales were in Pulaski County and totaled $7,208,623.50.
 
The lowest sales were in Montgomery County and totaled $28,718.00.
 
In Polk County the total was $168,800.00.
 
According to the Family Council, only about 14 cents of each dollar spent on lottery tickets in Arkansas actually goes to the so called Arkansas Scholarship Lottery.
 
11-14-19 6:40 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments November 13th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Richard Roper, white male, age 37, Count I: Residential Burglary, a Class "B" Felony. Count II: Theft By Receiving, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony. Count IV: Residential Burglary, a Class "B" Felony. Count V: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count VI: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony. Count VII: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Richard Roper, white male, age 37, Count I: Residential Burglary, a Class "B" Felony. Count II" Theft Of Property, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Curtis Parnell, white male, age 37, Count I: Residential Burglary, a class "B" Felony. Count II: Theft By Receiving, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony. Count IV: Residential Burglary, a Class "B" Felony. Count V: Theft Of Property, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count VI: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony. Count VII: Breaking Or Entering, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Curtis Parnell, white male, age 37, Count I: Residential Burglary, a Class "B" Felony. Count II: Theft Of Property, a Class "D" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Angela N. Fults, white female, age 20, Count I: Furnishing, Possessing, Or Using Prohibited Articles, a Class "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. April K. Poor, white female, age 40, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine), a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony.
 
11-14-19 6:27 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 
 

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Polk County Election Commission Ballot Position Drawing December 4th

THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC MEETING OF THE POLK COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2019 AT 9:00 A.M. IN THE BASEMENT CONFERENCE ROOM OF THE POLK COUNTY COURTHOUSE. THE PURPOSE OF THIS MEETING IS TO DRAW FOR BALLOT POSITIONS FOR ALL CONTESTED POSITIONS THAT WILL APPEAR ON THE MARCH 3RD PRIMARY BALLOT. ALL MEETINGS OF THE COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AND ALL CANDIDATES OR ANY INTERESTED PARTY ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND.

 

11-14-19 4:10 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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UARM Adult Education Recognized by Division of Workforce Services

UARM Adult Education Recognized by Division of Workforce Services, Receives Grant for Alternative Sentencing

 

The Adult Education Program provided through UA Rich Mountain was recently recognized by the State of Arkansas’ Division of Workforce Services for exceeding specified benchmarks designed to gauge success of programs. For the 2018-2019 program year, UA Rich Mountain’s Adult Education performed 10 percentage points beyond the Measurable Skill Gains minimum.

 

Local Adult Education Program Director Joel Bush was very quick to share the credit of their success with his staff and the prior director, Terri Francis, who led the program during a portion of the year being recognized. “Their commitment to students of this program is impeccable. I am able to witness them, day in and day out, go above and beyond to empower these students and identify resources that will allow each individual to meet their educational and training goals,” said Bush.

 

(L-R) Program Director Joel Bush, Administrative Assistant and GED Testing Coordinator Renee Young, Adult Education Instructor Bonnie Medlin, and SNAP E&T Coordinator Donah Simmons.

 

Bush also recently held his first meeting with an Advisory Board of local business and industry managers and community partners to identify specific skill sets lacking in the workforce that the local program can assist in developing.

 

The Adult Ed Program is also the recipient of a two-year Alternative Sentencing grant. The Smart Sentencing Program, SSP, offers innovative pre-trial and pre-sentencing sanctions and services for offenders who are accepted into the program. Law enforcement, the judiciary, prosecution, defense, probation and community service providers, working together, guide the administration and operation of the program as it works to enhance public safety, hold offenders accountable and develop competencies in offenders such as that they can become productive, contributing members of society.

One goal pertinent to the Adult Ed program is to increase competencies in offenders through educational and vocational training, mental health management, drug treatment and other basic life-skills training so that they are better equipped to live crime-free lives.

 

“Education is key to individual development and I’ve always been impressed with the heart of the staff at UA Rich Mountain and their commitment to each individual student, on every level, to meet their goals,” said UA Rich Mountain Chancellor Dr. Phillip Wilson.

 

For more information on the Adult Ed program and its resources, please visit the Abernathy Building on the campus of UA Rich Mountain or call 479.394.7622 ext. 1380.

 

11-14-19 9:48 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Weekend Activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

 

For more information about any of the activities at Queen Wilhelmina State Park near Mena, or the state park, dial (479) 394-2863, or visit the park's website by clicking here

 

Friday, November 15
 

Silent Hike starting at 11:15 am and lasting around 1 hour and 30 minutes. Meet at the North Side of Lovers’ Leap Trail.

Have you ever been on a trail and never seen an animal? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we hike silently down to the Lovers’ Leap platform. Along the way we will observe what we can see and hear as we silently walk through the woods.


 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.


 

Touch Table starting at 4:00 pm and masting about 1 hour. Meet in the Hearth Room.

There will be different things that you can see and touch. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun, interactive way of exploring things found in our park, and find out what they are.

 

Slithering Snakes starting at 7:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.

What type of snake slither over the forest floor at Queen Wilhelmina? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to learn a few of the venomous and non-venomous snakes we have here at Queen Wilhelmina.


 

Saturday, November 16
 

Fall Foliage Walk starting at 11:15 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet on the North side of Lovers’ Leap.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take an easy stroll to the Lovers' Leap observation deck and observer the fall foliage along the way.


 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.


 

Edible Insects starting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.

Is eating bugs a real thing? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and see who really eats bugs. If you’re brave enough you can join the “I Ate A Bug Club!” Bring your appetite and take a bite or come and watch!


 

Sunset Art in the Park starting at 4:45 pm and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet in the Picnic Area.

It is time to express yourself! We all have an artist inside, and Queen Wilhelmina is the perfect place to get inspired. Join Park Interpreter Melissa and paint a picture of the sun as it sets on Rich Mountain with water colors.


 

Sunday, November 17
 

Reservoir Hike starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet at the  Reservoir Trailhead.

Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a hike to what used to be the old water system for the 1898 hotel


 

Wonder House Tour starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.

Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.


 

Dutch Oven Demonstration starting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet at the Pavilion.

Are you in need of a tasty treat for this week? Stop by Queen Wilhelmina picnic area to find out how much better dessert is cooked over a fire! Park Interpreter Melissa will be using the state vessel – a Dutch oven – to cook-up a simple and delicious dessert. Come by for a taste.

 

11-14-19 6:54 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Mena Street - Pine Street - Dallas Avenue Intersection Closed Friday

 

 

The intersection of South Mena Street, Pine Street, and Dallas Avenue will be closed Friday, November 15th, while Mena Water Department crews repair a water line.

 

If you travel this area during the day, plan ahead for an alternate route. 

 

 

11-13-19 8:23 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Veterans Day Parade Rescheduled For Saturday, November 16th

The Mena Veterans Day Parade that was scheduled for Veterans Day was postponed due to the weather. 

 
The parade will be Saturday, November 16th starting at 10:00 a.m. in downtown Mena. The weather forecast for Mena Saturday calls for sunny skies and it will be around 50° at parade time. 
 
Parade participants will line up at 9:00 a.m. in the Crossing Church parking lot.
 
The parade route will be from the Crossing Church south on North Mena Street, cross Hwy 71, and end at Washburn's on South Mena Street.
 
Spread the word and come out Saturday and show your support for our Veterans!
 
11-13-19 8:08 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for Nov. 13, 2019. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below for current fishing information from that area, compliments of KAWX Communitty Radio.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

11-13-19 4:05 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Budget Committee Will Reccomend $11.5 Million Budget To Quorum Court

The Polk County Quorum Court Budget Committee met Tuesday night to consider the 2020 Polk County Budget. The Committee, chaired by Justice of the Peace Jim Neugent, has worked for some time now on the budget with other elected officials and key people in county government, and only made minor changes to the proposed $11,545,890 proposed budget for 2020 at the meeting.

 

The County General Budget is $5,104,217 and is money the Quorum Court can appropirtate.The $6,441,673 difference in the overall budget is money earmarked for specific purposes, like the county road tax money and grants the county administers.

 

The proposed 2020 budget is slightly higher that the 2019 budget, mainly because of a significant increase in the cost of insurance for employees.

 

The Committee voted unanimously to recommend to the full Quorum Court at their November meeting that the budget be adopted.

 

The Budget Committee is made up of Neugent, Tawana Gilbert, Terry Terrell, Harold Coogan, and Tommy Floyd.

 

11-13-19 8:36 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Final Polk County Election Filings for 2020 Election

The books closed at 12:00 p.m. Tuesday for candidates to file for open positions in the 2020 Election, which included all eleven Justice of the Peace Districts, all constable positions, Mena School Board Positions 1 and 2, Ouachita River School Board Zone 6, and Cossatot River School Board Zone 2 and 4.

 

Contested races will include:

 

Justice of the Peace District 3 Harold Coogan (I) and the incumbent will face Levi Ellison (R)

 

Justice of the Peace District 5 Troy Lunsford (I) and the incumbent will face Russell Scott Kiersey (R)

 

Constable Eagle Township will be a three way race between Ray Hagler (R), Jimmy Titsworh (I), and Brett Ham (I)

 

Constable Potter Township will be a two way race between James Richardson (I) and Eddie Price (I)

 

Mena School Board Position I Todd Aynes (I) the incumbent will face Brandyn Gortemiller (I)

 

Mena School Board Position 2 Robert "Robby" Hines (I) the incumbent will face Calvin Cummings (I).

 

Running for re-election uncontested will be:

 

Chris Daniel Justice of the Peace District 1

 

Jimmy D. Neugent Justice of the Peace District 2

 

Margarett Elizabeth "Margo" Kimp Justice of the Peace District 4

 

Terry Terrell Justice of the Peace District 6

 

Lana Philpot Ouachita River School Board Zone 6

 

Joshua N. Tadlock Cossatot River School Board Zone 2

 

Nick Strother Cossatot River School Board Zone 4.

 

Tommy Floyd Justice of the Peace District 7

 

Terry Scott Justice of the Peace District 8

 

Mitchell Tidwell Justice of the Peace District 10

 

Tawana Gilbert Justice of the Peace District 11

 

Gene Hendrix Constable Gap Springs Township

 

Kristopher Lyle Constable Acorn/Rich Mountain Township 

 

Don "Cloud" Davis Constable Mountain Township.

 

Non incumbents running without opposition include:

 

Robert Hutcheson Constable Center Township

 

Bradley Garner Constable Fulton Township

 

Brad Frachiseur Constable White Township

 

The Primary Election will be March 3, 2020 and the General Election will be November 3, 2020.

 

11-12-19 12:38 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

 

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Polk County Sheriff's Report for November 4th - 10th

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of November 4 – November 10, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


November 4, 2019
Report of an unattended death on Polk 5 near Grannis.  Deputy responded
Report from complainant on Highway 246 West near Hatfield of the theft of a well and wellhouse, valued at $500.00.  Investigation continues.


November 5, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 19 near Cove of being harassed by an acquaintance.
Report of a dog bite victim on Polk 18 near Vandervoort.  Deputy responded.
Report of a domestic disturbance on West Boundary Road near Mena led to the arrest of Rachel M. Jones, 42, of Russellville, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.
Report from complainant on Polk 85 near Cherry Hill of the break-in and theft of alcohol and cash, totaling losses at $110.00.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Rachel M. Jones, 42, of Hatfield, on a Charge of Disorderly Conduct.
Arrested was Jeremy C. Garrison, 43, of Mena, on Warrants for Possession of a Schedule VI Controlled Substance, Failure to Appear and two counts of Failure to Comply with a Court Order.


November 6, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 193 near Yocana of an unauthorized person on their property.  Investigation continues.
Report from complainant on Highway 88 East near Yocana of the break-in and theft of two firearms and a leaf blower, all valued at $450.00.  The items were later recovered.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 88 East near Yocana of the break-in and theft of a knife and swords, all valued at $190.00.  Investigation continues.
Arrested was Curtis R. Parnell, 35, of Mena, on Warrants for Theft of Property, Residential Burglary, Theft by Receiving and a Parole Hold.


November 7, 2019
Arrested was Richard B. Roper, 37, of Cove, on Warrants for Residential Burglary, Theft by Receiving and Probation Violation.


November 8, 2019
Report of a semi-truck and trailer stuck in the ditch on Polk 181 near Mena.  Deputy responded.
Report of the discovery of a suspicious substance led to two 13-year-old males and two 12-year-old males all being issued Juvenile Citations for Possession of a Controlled Substance.  The juveniles were released to the custody of parent/guardians.
Arrested was Ilia M. Rushin, 38, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.


November 9, 2019
No reports were filed.


November 10, 2019
Report from a complainant on Polk 20 West near Cove of the theft of a package.  Investigation continues.
Report of a domestic disturbance on Highway 8 West near Shady Grove.  Deputies responded.  One of the parties left the residence for the night.  Investigation continues.


Report from complainant on Highway 71 South near Cove that their back door had been kicked in.  Investigation continues.

Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 24 Incarcerated Inmates , with 16 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00794

 

11-12-19 10:18 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report for October November 2rd - 9th

 

Mena Police Reports from November 3, 2019 through November 9, 2019 

 

November 3, 2019

Officers responded to a call at a local business regarding an altercation on the parking lot.  No charges have been filed at this time.

Report was made of a disturbance between an estranged couple regarding custody.  No charges filed.

Devin Wheless , 25, of Mena was charged with third degree battery, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia,   The arrest followed a call to a local residence.

 

November 4, 2019

Jody Herron, 45, of Malvern was charged with possession of schedule IV, schedule VI and schedule I or 2 controlled substances.  The arrest followed a traffic stop.

Report was made of someone breaking into a local residence.  Case is pending identification, location and interview of suspect.

 

November 5, 2019

A Mena woman reported that her husband was threatening her.  She did not wish to press charges, she merely wanted him to leave her alone.  The incident followed a traffic stop.

 

Officers responded to a call regarding a child in the highway.  The boy was returned to his mother and no charges were filed.

 

November 6 & 7, 2019

Report was made of someone breaking into two units at a local self-storage facility.  Case was forwarded to County officers who were working on a series of such incidents in Polk County.

 

November 8 & 9, 2019

A local woman reported that unauthorized purchases were made on her debit card in Texas.  Case pending.

 

11-12-19 9:31 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

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UA Rich Mountain to Celebrate Centennial of Women's Right to Vote

With election season already in full swing, it’s important to be reminded of the efforts to make possible a privilege of what 50.8% of this country’s population wasn’t always guaranteed, a woman’s right to vote. Several generations of women, lectured, wrote, marched, lobbied, and even practiced civil disobedience to achieve what many Americans considered a radical change of the Constitution. The milestone they helped to birth, the 19th amendment, guarantees all American women the right to vote. The victory took decades of agitation and protest and sadly, few early supporters lived to see the final victory in 1920.

 

UA Rich Mountain will be hosting Dr. Angela Boswell, Professor of History and Dean of the Ellis College of Arts and Sciences at Henderson State University to share with both students and the community. Earning her Ph.D. from Rice University, Boswell has published numerous articles and reviews, mainly about Southern women’s roles in history. She has edited a couple of volumes on the history of Southern women, a subject, she says, that’s still relatively untapped. “I’m not interested in the famous women,” she says. “I have difficulty naming the most important ones. I’m much more interested in what regular human beings are doing, whether men or women. That were THEY experiencing in everyday life? The South is different from the rest of the country,” she explains. “Southern women had a very different experience from New England women. Because of slavery, Southern women were much less likely to challenge the prevailing social mores. While Northern women’s rights were moving forward, Southern women were still staying at home.”

 

“History is a balancing act for historians,” Boswell says. “You cannot be absolutely 100% certain it’s true because you’re not there. And from the moment something happens, it is constantly being revised because our understanding and interpretation changes. We’re still living in the result of history and, therefore, it never passes away.”

 

The speaking engagement will be held in the Ouachita Center on the Mena Campus of UA Rich Mountain, Monday, November 18 at 10 a.m. The event is free and open to anyone wanting to learn more about this fascinating time in history.

 

11-11-19 6:38 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Cotton POW/MIA Flag Bill Becomes Law Ahead of Veterans Day

Washington, D.C.— Thursday, the president signed into law Senator Cotton’s National POW/MIA Flag Act, which requires the POW/MIA flag to be displayed whenever the American flag is displayed on prominent federal properties to honor the more than 82,000 Americans who are listed as Prisoners of War (POW), Missing in Action (MIA), or otherwise unaccounted for from our nation's past wars and conflicts. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), along with Senators John Thune (R-South Dakota), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Arizona), Maggie Hassan (D-New Hampshire) Pat Toomey (R-Pennsylvania), Marco Rubio (R-Florida), and Jack Reed (D-Rhode Island) were original co-sponsors of the bill, which was first introduced during the 115th Congress and reintroduced earlier this year.  

 

"There's no better time than Veterans Day to honor those who left our shores only to be held captive, and those who have still not returned," said Senator Cotton. "Over 82,000 Americans remain missing from past wars and prominently displaying the POW/MIA flag will help remind all Americans of their service and sacrifice."

  

"All three of my veteran brothers came home safe after their service, but many do not," said Senator Warren. "This bipartisan law ensures that the POW/MIA Flag is consistently and prominently displayed and that we never forget those servicemembers who have not returned home."

 

The National POW/MIA Flag Act requires the POW/MIA flag to be displayed whenever the American flag is displayed at federal locations already designated under existing law. Those locations include the U.S. Capitol, the White House, the World War II Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, every national cemetery, the buildings containing the official offices of the Secretaries of State, Defense, and Veterans Affairs, the office of the Director of the Selective Service System, each major military installation (as designated by the Secretary of Defense), each Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, and each United States Postal Service Post Office.

 

Before this bill became law, the POW/MIA Flag was required to be displayed by the federal government on certain prominent federal properties only six days per year: Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, National POW/MIA Recognition Day, and Veterans Day.

 

Representatives Chris Pappas (D-NH-01) and Jack Bergman (R-MI-01) sponsored the House version of the bill.

 

The legislation is supported by Rolling Thunder, Inc. National; Rolling Thunder Inc. Massachusetts Chapters 1 and 2; the National League of POW/MIA Families; Veterans of Foreign Wars; The American Legion; American Ex-Prisoners of War; and the National Alliance of Families for the Return of America's Missing Servicemen.

 

11-9-19 6:40 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Friday Election Filings in Polk County

 
 
Four candidates filed for offices in the 2020 election Friday in Polk County.
 
Robby Hines filed for re-election to the Mena School Board Position 2.
 
Jimmy Titsworth filed for Constable of the Eagle Township, a position currently held by Bradley Garner.
 
Basil Kesterson filed for re-election as Justice of the Peace District 9.
 
Brett Ham filed for Constable of the Eagle Township, a position currently held by Bradley Garner.
 
The filing period will continue until November 12th at noon.
 
11-8-19 5:07 p.m. KAWX.ORG
 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: Arkansas and the Land of the Rising Sun

Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Address
Arkansas and the Land of the Rising Sun
 
 
TOKYO, Japan – I have been in Asia this week, and as I wrap up our visit to Japan, I’d like to talk about the significance of our relationship with the country known as the Land of the Rising Sun.
 
Japan has been an economic-development partner with Arkansas for decades. The Arkansas Economic Development Commission opened an office in Japan in 1985, from which the commission promotes direct foreign investment in Japan, South Korea, India, and other countries in Southeast Asia. Neal Jansen, who graduated from the Math and Science School in Hot Springs and the University of Arkansas, works out of Arkansas’s trade office in Osaka.
 
Twenty-two Japanese companies have 45 operations in Arkansas, and this makes Japan a success story for investment in our state. They employ nearly 6,000 people. Japan ranks No. 2 in the state for the number of parent companies and No. 1 with the number of foreign-owned operations. The Japanese companies come from points all over Japan and have opened in towns all over Arkansas. Daikin Industries from Osaka is in Fayetteville. DENSO Manufacturing from Kariya is in Osceola. Marubeni Corporation from Tokyo is in Newport. Hino Motors and Toyota Motor Corporation from Tokyo are in Marion. Nippon Sheet Glass is from Tokyo and is in Little Rock. Nidec Motor Corporation from Kyoto is in Mena. Nucor-Yamato Steel Company in Himeji City is in Blytheville.
 
In 2018, Arkansas imported $236 million worth of goods from Japan. Our top imports from Japan included machinery; electrical machinery; vehicles, parts and accessories; and iron and steel.
 
In 2018, Japan was our tenth largest customer. Our $167 million worth of exports included paper and paperboard; organic chemicals; electrical machinery; poultry; soybeans; cotton; and a variety of other agricultural products.
 
The products that Japanese companies manufacture in Arkansas include air filters for diesel locomotives; railroad tie plates; heating and air conditioning assemblies and a variety of plastic parts for automobiles; axles and suspension components for automobiles; electric motors for cars and appliances; steel tire cord for radial tires; and cold steel.
 
While in Tokyo, Mike Preston, my Secretary of Commerce, and I participated in a forum with a Japan Business Federation. I had the opportunity to speak about doing business in Arkansas. Before my remarks, I had a private conversation with the chairman, Mr. Yoshikawa. Mr. Yoshikawa quickly informed me that he had been to Arkansas. He mentioned Hot Springs, and then he said he had been to the King Biscuit Blue Festival in Helena. He plays the banjo and loves the blues.
 
It is indeed a small world in which there are so many connections to our great state.
 

11-8-19 4:41 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

Arkansas is home to over 219,000 Veterans. They live and work in every community throughout our state.

 

Our men and women who served are an extraordinarily selfless group. They worked as a team and looked out for one another. 

We must look out for them. 

 

In 2017, the General Assembly passed Act 141 which exempts military retirement benefits from state income tax.

This year, we continued our effort to improve veteran affairs in our state with various legislation.

 

ACT 820 of 2019 provides automatic licensure for active duty service members, returning military veterans, the spouses of active duty service members, and the spouses of returning military veterans. This eliminates red tape for our military and veterans by allowing those individuals to engage in an occupation if they are in good standing of an equivalent occupational license issued by another state.

 

ACT 66 of 2019 allows a person applying to obtain a veteran designation on a driver's license or identification card to provide different types of military discharge documents to show that he or she had a discharge status of "honorable" or "general under honorable conditions".

 

And we continue our work with an extensive study outlined in Act 551. Act 551 requires the House Committee on Aging, Children and Youth, Legislative and Military Affairs and the Senate Committee on State Agencies and Governmental Affairs to examine veterans issues within Arkansas.

 

The committees met just recently in El Dorado.  Members were updated on the economic impact veterans have on our state and ways we can improve delivery of services. Members were also briefed by the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) on ways efforts to prevent suicides among the veteran population.

 

According to the 2019 National Veteran Suicide Prevention annual report, 6,139 veterans died by suicide in 2017, 97 of whom were Arkansans. The Arkansas Department of Veteran’s Affairs (ADVA), the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), the Arkansas Veteran’s Coalition and the Central Arkansas Veteran’s Healthcare System’s (CAVHS) Suicide Prevention Program have formed a partnership to address the issue of veteran suicide in the state. This Veterans Day, the department wants current and former service men and women to know there is help and hope.

 

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number is 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Veterans can access the Veteran Crisis Line by calling the national line and pressing 1. Anyone can also text the crisis line by sending TALK to 741741 or chat online at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/.

 

11-8-19 3:00 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Veteran's Appreciation Luncheon Monday in Mena

 
Veterans will be honored in Mena on Veteran's Day with a luncheon at the UARM Ouachita Center.
 
Veterans are invited to come anytime between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. for a catfish dinner with all the trimmings.
 
 
11-8-19 2:40 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

 

Military Veterans’ Civic Engagement Enriches Communities

 

 

Veterans Day is a time to reflect on the service and sacrifice of the men and women who wore our nation’s uniform. These selfless individuals come from all walks of life and all regions. The thing that unites them is that they answered the call to serve their country, risking everything to protect American ideals, fight for democracy and secure a free country for future generations. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that their selflessness and desire to serve continues once out of uniform.

 

In 2015, the Veterans Civic Health Index found that military service positively impacts civic health and strengthens communities. The skills and camaraderie veterans gain in the military are something many continue to practice and foster throughout their lives. Whether it be volunteering, engaging with civic groups or voting, veterans tend to participate at rates higher than non-veterans.

 

More than 220,000 veterans call Arkansas home. We can be proud of their military service and the example they set constantly working to make our country better. Their enduring loyalty to our nation makes a tremendous difference in the lives of others.

 

Advances in veteran services are due in large part to organizations of veteran members. The advocacy of the American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars and other veteran service organizations has enhanced veterans’ benefits and influenced policies that support the men and women who served in uniform, including helping veterans further their education, buy houses and start businesses.

 

Arkansas is full of great examples of veterans who continue giving to their communities long after ending their military service. With the launch of the Arkansas Military Veterans’ Hall of Fame (AMVHOF) in 2011, more individuals are being recognized for their impact and legacy both inside and outside of the Armed Forces.

 

Earlier this month, I celebrated the induction of 15 veterans into the Hall of Fame. This prestigious honor is awarded annually to Arkansans for their military service. Up to five inductees are chosen for this distinction for their combined military and civilian service to their community, the state and nation. The induction into the AMVHOF symbolizes the extraordinary military service and positive contributions veterans continue to make to our country.

 

While serving in our nation’s uniform, troops learn the value of working as a team to accomplish missions and keep each other safe. It’s an idea that continues to resonate when they leave military service.

 

In an interview conducted by my staff with retired Conway airman Lt. Col. James Hudson for the Veterans History Project, a program that preserves the memories of military veterans, he said “One of the things that veterans say they enjoy about the military is the camaraderie. You’re caring for one another. It’s just natural.”

 

That kindness and compassion is a standard for many veterans. We are blessed to have their support and their unselfish example of what it means to be a good citizen. Let’s thank our veterans for wearing our nation’s uniform and for their ongoing service and desire to improve their communities, state and nation.

 

11-8-19 1:28 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Very Cold Airmass Expected Early Next Week

 
A very cold airmass will move into the state early next week, with the coldest air of the season for expected to settle across Arkansas. The main concern will be the cold air as wind chill values could drop into the single digits and teens by Tuesday morning. This is where our confidence is highest regarding expected hazards early next week.
 
While rainfall is expected for most areas, the potential for seeing some wintry weather does exist. However, there will be a small window of opportunity to see any wintry precipitation Monday into Monday Night. At this time, if accumulations were to be seen, they would be light, with the best chances across the higher terrain of the Ozarks. There will also be some potential for seeing wintry weather further south, but no accumulations are expected. Overall, the threat for hazardous travel conditions due to wintry precipitation seems relatively low given the latest forecast information and current ground temperatures.
Refer to the latest forecast updates in the coming days for any changes to this forecast.
 
Mena and Polk County weather information is available at KAWX.ORG, by dialing (479) 394-5600, or by listening to NOAA Weather Radio or NOAA Weather Radio Online with your PC or with a free Mena Weather Radio app courtesy of KAWX Community Radio.

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

November 8, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – Adequately funding public schools is one of the most complex, time-consuming and important duties of the legislature.

 

Making it even more challenging is structuring the school funding formula to address the achievement gap between students from low-income families and those from more prosperous families. The gap refers to the lower scores made on standardized tests by low income students.

 

Here’s an example, based on scores made by Arkansas students on the ACT Aspire tests administered during the 2017-2018 school year. Only 30 percent of low income students scored at grade level, compared to 57.2 percent of non-low income students.

 

Scores in reading and math show similar achievement gaps.

 

The state provides bonus funding to school districts according to a formula that accounts for the number of low income students enrolled. The bonus funding category used to be called NSL, for National School Lunch, because eligibility for free and reduced price lunches indicates a student’s low income status. Now, the bonus funding is called ESA, for Enhanced Student Achievement funding.

 

About 60 percent of Arkansas students are eligible for free or reduced price school lunches. Schools with a higher percentage of low income students receive a higher rate of ESA bonus funding.

 

For example, if a district’s enrollment of low income students is less than 70 percent of its total enrollment, it receives $526 per student in ESA funding. There are 113 districts in this category.

 

If a district’s student body is from 70 to 90 percent low income, it receives bonus funding of $1,051 per low income student. There are 112 districts in this category.

 

There are 10 school districts in Arkansas in which more than 90 percent of students are low income. They receive $1,576 per low income student.

School districts are limited in how they spend ESA bonus funding. There are more than 20 approved uses, but the most common are for instructional facilitators and tutors, and for activities designed to help low income students academically. Also, districts can use the funding to hire teachers’ aides, counselors, nurses and social workers.

 

Last year, Arkansas schools received almost $234 million in ESA funding, which was about four percent of their total revenue.

 

Research indicates that students from low income families face obstacles to learning such as a lack of nutritious food, a lack of resources in the household, unsafe neighborhoods and a lack of adult role models. Generally, their parents’ academic background is poor, so the parents cannot teach and guide the students as well as parents from more prosperous families.

 

During a recent meeting of the Senate and House Education Committees, when legislators worked on the state’s ESA policy, they heard comments from advocacy groups that focus on improving education.

 

They included the Walton Family Foundation, the Walton Personal Philanthropy Group, the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, the Arkansas Rural Education Association and the Arkansas School Boards Association.

 

When the legislature convenes in regular session in January of 2021, legislators will have put in countless hours on the difficult challenge of closing the achievement gap between poor students and those growing up with more advantages.

 

11-8-19 9:57 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senate GOP Highlights Boozman's Efforts to Preserve Veterans' Stories, Memories

 

WASHINGTON DC- In advance of Veterans Day, the Senate Republican Conference featured U.S. Senator John Boozman’s (R-AR) efforts to promote the Veterans History Project (VHP) and discussed his office’s participate in the program ‘Off Topic’ video series.

 

The VHP is an archive at the Library of Congress cataloging the oral histories and personal documents of the men and women who served our country in uniform.

 

“I just got intrigued with this,” Boozman said in the video. “One of my regrets is that my father, who was a waist gunner on B-17s in WWII, didn’t talk much about his experiences. I wish this project was going on before he passed away so we could have gotten his story.”

 

Boozman actively promotes, participates in and supports additional funding for the program. His office has trained more than 1,000 Arkansans to preserve the stories of veterans. He and his office have conducted 60 interviews that have been submitted to the VHP. Hear from some of the Arkansas veterans interviewed by Boozman’s office here.

 

In honor of Veterans Day, Boozman encourages Arkansans to get involved in the VHP and preserve the memories of veterans in their lives and communities.

 

Learn more about the VHP here.

 

11-8-19 9:10 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Apprenticeship Week To Be Observed In Arkansas November 11th - 17th

 

Governor Asa Hutchinson has proclaimed November 11th -17th as Arkansas Apprenticeship Week to recognize the 127 programs that are currently training apprentices in the state of Arkansas, and also recognizing the near 6,500 apprentices in our state. The number of apprentices has increased by 34% from last year.

 

 

Mena businessman Greg Aleshire (far left) serves on the  Arkansas Apprenticeship Coordination Steering Committee.

 

Click here to find out more about trade schools and apprenticeships in Arkansas. 

 

Click here to see the Governor's proclamation.

 

11-8-19 9:00 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena City Council Meets Tuesday, Nov. 12th

 

The Mena City Council regular monthly meeting for November will be Tuesday, November 12, 2019 starting at 6:00 p.m. in City Hall.

 
In addition to routine business, the Council will hear reports from the City Clerk/Treasurer, Water and Sewer Departments, and other Department Heads.
 
Committee reports are also expected from the A&P Commission, Planning Commission, and Board of Adjustments and Appeals.
 
New business om the agenda:

 

  • Consider an Ordinance to Levy the 2019 Millage Rate

 

  • Consider the annual Arkansas Municipal League Accidental Death and Dismemberment Plan for elected officials and department heads

 

  • Consider quotes received to purchase new audience chairs for the Council Room

 

  • Consider a 2019 Salary Adjustment for all full-time City Employees

 

  • Consider the re-appointment of Katrina Sisk to the city of Mena Board of Adjustments and Appeals - a five-year term to expire 10/31/2024

 

  • Consider the appointment of Jeremiah Hall to teh City of Mena Planning Commission - a five-year term expiring 10/31/2024.

 

City Council meetings are open to the public. 

 

11-8-19 8:27 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Kevin Wayne Dehart Guilty On Two Rape Charges

Kevin Wayne Dehart was found guilty today in Polk County Circuit Court of two counts of rape and sentenced to 40 years in prison for each charge. The prison terms will run consecutively.

 

Dehart pleaded guilty last year in U.S. District Court to one count of attempted online enticement of a minor and was sentenced to more than 11 years in prison.

 

Dehart, 53, was arrested in July 2017 during an undercover investigation into the online enticement of minors for sex in the Mena area, according to court records.

 

Authorities posed as a 14-year-old boy online and exchanged messages with Dehart, who said he wanted to have sex with the boy.

 

Dehart then made plans to meet the teen for sex. Police set up a location to meet and arrested Dehart when he arrived.

 

Mena police and the U.S. Secret Service investigated the case. 

 

Dehart has been incarcerated by the Arkansas Department of Corrections and temporarily in the Polk County Jail during the most recent trial.

 

11-7-19 8:52 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Thursday Election Filings in Polk County

Four candidates filed for office int eh 2020 election Thursday in Polk County.

 

Eddie Price filed for Constable of the Potter Township. There is currently not a Constable for this township.

 
Levi Ellison filed for Justice of the Peace District 3, a position currently held by Harold Coogan.
 
Tawana Gilbert filed for re-election for Justice of the Peace District 11.
 
Russell Scott Kiersey filed for Justice of the Peace District 5, a position currently held by Troy Lunsford.
 
11-7-19 4:45 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 
Related articles:
 
 
 
 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments November 1st, 4th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Jody M. Herron, white female, age 45, Count I: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia, a Class "D" Felony. Count III: Possession Of A Schedule IV Or V Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor. Count IV: Possession Of A Controlled Substance, a Class "A" Misdemeanor.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Stephanie A. Abbott, white female, age 39, Count I: Probation Violation. The Original Offense was Battery In The Second Degree. Bond was set at $10,000.00.
 
11-7-19 9:55 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.
 

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Wednesday Election Filings in Polk County

Three candidates filed on Wednesday for the 2020 election.

 
James Richardson filed for Constable of the Potter Township. There is currently not a constable for that township.
 
Gene Hendrix filed for re-election as Constable of the Gap Springs Township.
 
Kris Lyle filed for re-election as Constable of the Acorn Township.
 
11-6-19 4:36 p.m. KAWX.ORG
 
Related articles:
 
 

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Weekly Arkansas Fishing Report

This is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s weekly fishing report for November 6, 2019, and is published on KAWX.ORG each week as a courtesy of KAWX Community Radio in Mena. If there is a body of water you would like included in this report, please email jim.harris@agfc.ar.gov with information on possible sources for reports about that lake or river. Reports are updated weekly, although some reports might be published for two weeks if updates are not received promptly or if reporters say conditions haven’t changed. Contact the reporter listed for the lake or stream you plan to fish for current news. Note: msl = mean sea level; cfs = cubic feet per second.

 

Click on the area of the state below where you would like current fishing information from.

 

Central Arkansas

 

North Arkansas

 

Northwest Arkansas

 

Northeast Arkansas

 

Southeast Arkansas

 

Southwest Arkansas

 

South-Central Arkansas

 

West-Central Arkansas

 

East Arkansas

 

Arkansas River and White River levels are available at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk

 

For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt

 

For water-quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality.

 

11-6-19 2:23 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

 

Click on the NOAA Weather Radio below to listen to Mena NOAA Weather Radio Station KXI97 on your PC compliments of KAWX Community Radio. To listen on your phone or tablet, download the free Mena Weather Radio app from the App Store or Google Play. The online Weather Radio and Mena Weather Radio apps are not intended to replace actual NOAA Weather Radios with alerting capabilities. NOAA Weather Radios are available at Goss Electronics in Mena.

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Tuesday Election Filings in Polk County

 

Six candidates filed for public office Tuesday in Polk County for the 2020 election.

 
Justices of the Peace Terry Scott District 8, Margarett Elizabeth "Margo Kimp District 4, and Jimmy D. Neugent District 2 all filed for re-election.
 
Lana Philpot filed for Ouachita River School Board Zone 6.
 
Todd Aynes filed for re-election for Mena School Board Position 1.
 
Bradley Garner filed for Constable of the Fulton Township.
 
The filing period will continue until noon on November 12, 2019.
 
The Primary Election will be March 3, 2020 and the General Election will be November 3, 2020.
 
Click here for a link to yesterday's article with the first round of filings.
 
11-5-19 4:31 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Firewood Permits Available on Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests

 

RUSSELLVILLE, Ark. – Ouachita and Ozark-St. Francis National Forests’ officials are encouraging homeowners and others in need of firewood for the winter season to visit their local ranger district offices to apply for a firewood permit.

 

Firewood permits for personal use are available in many areas of the Arkansas and Oklahoma forests. They are sold in cubic feet, but in simple terms, 100 cubic feet is roughly equivalent to three-fourths of a cord of wood. A cord is made up of tightly stacked wood measuring 4 feet high by 4 feet wide by 8 feet long. The $20 minimum permit fee allows an individual or a family to cut and remove approximately three or four cords of firewood, depending on the national forest. Permits are for specific areas identified by local Ranger Districts and are issued in limited numbers based on availability and accessibility.

 

In an effort to stop the spread of invasive species, such as the emerald ash borer and the imported fire ant, permit holders in Arkansas and Oklahoma must abide by their respective state’s regulations. The Arkansas State Plant Board advises that firewood should be bought and used locally to prevent the spread of pests. Additionally, the Oklahoma Forestry Service strongly advises that in general, no firewood should be brought from out of state into Oklahoma, nor should residents of Oklahoma move firewood more than 50 miles from its source within the state.

 

For more information about firewood rules, regulations, recommendations, and pests of concern, visit  https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/

 

To identify firewood cutting areas on the National Forest, call the nearest Ranger District office for more information.

 

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests

 

 

 

City

Ranger District Office

Address

Phone

Clarksville, AR

Pleasant Hill Ranger District

2591 Hwy 21 North

479-754-2864

Hector, AR

Big Piney Ranger District – South

12000 SR 27

479-284-3150

Jasper, AR

Big Piney Ranger District – North

Hwy 7 North

870-446-5122

Marianna, AR

St. Francis National Forest

2675 Hwy 44

870-295-5278

Mountain View, AR

Sylamore Ranger District

1001 E. Main

870-269-3228

Ozark, AR

Boston Mountain Ranger District

1803 N. 18th Street

479-667-2191

Paris, AR

Mt. Magazine Ranger District

3001 E. Walnut

479-963-3076

 

 

 

 

Ouachita National Forest

 

 

 

City

Ranger District Office

Address

Phone

Booneville, AR

Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District

2190 E. Main Street

479-675-3233

Hochatown, OK

Oklahoma Ranger District

259A South

580-494-6402

Hodgen, OK

Oklahoma Ranger District

52175 US Hwy 59

918-653-2991

Jessieville/Perryville,  AR

Jessieville-Winona-Fourche Ranger District

8607 N. Hwy 7

501-984-5313

Mena, AR

Mena-Oden Ranger District

1603 Hwy 71 North

479-394-2382

Mt. Ida, AR

Caddo-Womble Ranger District

1523 Hwy 270 E.

870-867-2101

Waldron, AR

Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District

Hwy 71 South

479-637-4174

 

11-5-19 10:39 a.m. KAWX.ORG

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Polk County Sheriff's Log October 28th - November 3rd

 

SHERIFF’S   LOG


The following information was received from Polk County Sheriff Scott Sawyer for the week of October 28 – November 3, 2019.  The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts.  Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed or that they have been found innocent and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.


October 28, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 35 near Hatfield of being harassed by an acquaintance.  Investigation continues.
Traffic stop on Polk 35 near Hatfield led to a Citation for No Vehicle Insurance being issued to Jason W. Busby, 46, of Hatfield.


October 29, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 286 near Hatfield of two dogs killing their goat, totaling losses at $200.00.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Traffic stop on Polk 482 near Vandervoort led to the arrest of Chelsey R. Rodgers, 27, of Mena, on Charges of DWI 2, Driving with a Suspended Driver’s License and Defective Signal Lamps.
Arrested was Richard L. Smiley, 61, of Mena, on a Body Attachment Warrant.


October 30, 2019
Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Anthony W. Cottman, 31, of Mena, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court Order.


October 31, 2019
Report from complainant on Highway 8 West near Rocky of the alleged violation of an Order of Protection.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


November 1, 2019
Report from complainant on Polk 412 near Potter of damage done to a mailbox.  Investigation continues.
Report from walk-in complainant of problems regarding child custody exchange.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.


November 2, 2019
Arrested was Juan C. Luna, 36, of Horatio, on a Body Attachment Warrant.


November 3, 2019
Report of a death from complainant on Highway 88 East near Cherry Hill.  Deputy responded.
Report of a domestic disturbance on Hope Lane near Acorn.  Deputies responded.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Polk 89 near Mena of an individual that refused to return their vehicle.  The vehicle was returned to the owner.  Information has been forwarded to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for further consideration.
Report from complainant on Highway 246 East near Vandervoort of the theft of a firearm, valued at $179.00.  Investigation continues.


Polk County Sheriff’s Office worked six vehicle accidents this week.


Polk County Detention Center Jail Population: 20 Incarcerated Inmates , with 15 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.

PC19-00775

 

11-5-19 10:21 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

 

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This Weekend At Queen Wilhelmina State Park Near Mena

For more information about any of the activities listed below or the state park, dial (479) 394-2863 or visit the park's website by clicking here.
 
Thursday, November 7th
 
Unnatural Hike starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater.
 
How attentive do you really think you are? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to test your powers of observation in this fun interesting hidden item hunt along the Spring Trail.
 
Wonder House Tour  starting at 11:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.
Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s.
 
Ouachita Walk starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Meet at the west side of the Ouachita Trailhead.
Join Park Interpreter Melissa and enjoy a serene fall walk on top of the mountain to catch a glimpse of the changes the season brings with it. This will be an easy hike for all ages.
 
Friday, November 8th
 
Tree ID Hike starting at 11:15 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet on the nprth side of Lovers’ Leap Trail.
Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we take a stroll on the Lovers’ Leap Trail and identify the trees along the way. 
 
Champion Trees starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.
Do you ever wonder what the largest tree of its species are called? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and she will talk about the Champion Trees in Arkansas and where their located. 
 
Touch Table starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 1 hour. Meet in the     Hearth Room.
There will be different things that you can see and touch. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun, interactive way of exploring things found in our park, and find out what they are.
 
Black Bears starting at 7:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet in the    Hearth Room.
Do we have bears here at Queen Wilhelmina State Park? Join Park Interpreter Melissa to find out if these once almost extinct animals live near the park.
 

Saturday, November 9th

 

Critter Signs and Tracks starting at 2:00 pm and lasting about 45 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater.
Do you know what animals eat or where they get their food? Join Park Interpreter Melissa on a short hike to look for critter signs and track to see what is eaten for food.

 

Nature Art atarting at 3:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Amphitheater.
Who needs pencils, paint, or paper to create art? Join Park Interpreter Melissa as we create art with our natural resources.

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 4:00 pm and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.
Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s. 

 

Sunday, November 10th

 

Sip and Shine starting at 6:45 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet on the east side of Restaurant.

Are you a morning person? If so, grab a cup of coffee or your favorite morning drink and join Park Interpreter Melissa as we sip and watch the sunrise. Free coffee is available in the lobby of the Lodge. We recommend bringing your cameras to capture the beautiful sunrise.  

 

Bird Watching starting at 7:30 am and lasting about 1 hour. Meet on the north side of Lovers Leap.
Whether you’re a beginner or pro at birding, join park interpreter Melissa as we hike to the observation deck. We will be watching for birds along the way.  Bring your binoculars and we will see how many birds we can identify.  

 

Wonder House Tour starting at 10:00 am and lasting about 30 minutes. Meet at the Wonder House.
Do you ever wonder what the Wonder House is about? Join Park Interpreter Melissa and step back into history to see one of the first vacation homes built in the 1930’s. 

 

Bird Bingo starting at 1:00 pm and kasting about 45 minutes. Meet in the Hearth Room.     
This is not your ordinary bingo game. In this game of bingo, you will learn about the birds of Arkansas. If you are interested in birds, then you will enjoy this game. Join Park Interpreter Melissa for a fun filled game of Bingo.

 

11-5-19 7:27 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Portion of South Mena Street Closed Again Tuesday

 

Mena Street in the 1000 block by Washburn’s Home Furnishings will again be closed on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 for Street repairs.  Mayor Smith states “we regret any inconvenience this may cause the community and we appreciate your patience while these repairs are being made”.

 

11-4-19 7:30 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Seven File For Elected Office In Polk County

 

Seven people filed for elected office on the first day the books were open in Polk County for the 2020 election.

 
Justices of the Peace Chris Daniel District 1, Harold Coogan District 3, Terry Terrell District 6, and Tommy Floyd District 7, and Mitchell Tidwell District 10, all incumbents, filed for re-election.
 
Calvin Cummings filed for Mena School Board Position 2, the position currently held by Robert "Robby" Hines.
 
Ray Hagler filed for Constable for the Eagle Township.
 
The Primary Election will be held March 3, 2020 and the General Election will be held November 3, 2020.
 
11-4-19 4:29 p.m. KAWX.ORG 
 
 

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UARM Foundation Recipient of Martin Marietta Donation for Scholarships

 

[October 29, 2015 | MENA, Ark.] Salomon Hernandez, Site Manager for Martin Marietta in Wickes, presented Dr. Diann Gathright, Director of the UA Rich Mountain Foundation a gift for scholarships from the Marietta Foundation.

Hernandez expressed the company’s appreciation for the work the college does in the community as well as the educational opportunities that are provided locally. He indicated that Martin Marietta strongly supports furthering education for their employees and looks forward to a continued partnership with the college.

 

11-4-19 2:17 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Police Report for October 27th - November 2nd

 

 

Reports from October 27, 2019 through November 2, 2019 

 

 

October 27, 2019

Report was made of an altercation between a brother and sister.  No charges have been made at this time.

Officers responded to a city residence regarding a disagreement between two individuals.  Case is pending further investigation.

 

October 28, 2019

Stephanie Abbott, 39, of Mena was charged with third degree battery, possession of methamphetamine and furnishing prohibited items.  The arrest followed a call to a local residence.

Sean Craddock, 24, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant.  Officers travelled to Sebastian County and brought him back to Polk County.

 

October 29, 2019

Report was made of a local woman having unauthorized transactions on her debit card.  Case is pending receipt of and preview of a surveillance video.

 

October 30 & 31, 2019

A local woman reported that one of her sons was at her residence and had been warned to stay away.  Officers responded.  The woman stated that she did not want to press charges, she just wanted him to stay away from her house.  The man was given a verbal warning and officers left the scene.

 

November 1 & 2, 2019

Officers responded to a call from a local man who reported that his medication had been stolen from his vehicle while he was in a Mena store.  Case pending.

Jason Robertson, 40, of Mena was served an outstanding warrant. 

 

11-4-19 10:10 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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Street Closures Saturday in Mena for NIDEC Fun Run

 
For safety reasons during the NIDEC Fun Run Saturday, November 2, 2109, several streets will be closed from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.
 
The route that will be closed starts at North Morrow and College Drive, College Drive to Old Hwy 71, Old Hwy 71 to Guenther Drive, Guenther Drive to Industrial Park Road, Industrial Park Road to US Hwy 71.
 
Please drive with extra caution around Mena today as there are a number of activities that will result in many people in town!
 
11-2-19 7:23 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
 

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Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address: 10 Days. 1,500 Jobs

 
Governor Hutchinson's Weekly Radio Address

10 Days. 1,500 Jobs.
 
 
LITTLE ROCK – The past ten days have been filled with significant economic development news for Arkansas, and I’d like to share some of that today.
 
On October 24, I was in Jonesboro for the grand opening of the Risever Machine Company, which manufactures parts for companies such as Caterpillar and Volvo. The company is investing $20 million and creating more than 100 jobs.
 
The next day, I was in Blytheville for the opening of Nucor Corporation’s $230 million specialty cold-steel mill, which brought 100 new jobs to the area.
Two days ago, I joined the owners of HMS Manufacturing at the Port of Little Rock, where we announced the Troy, Michigan, company would be opening a plant. HMS will invest $20 million and create nearly 100 jobs. HMS is a woman-owned company that manufactures plastic houseware products such as wastebaskets and storage bins.
 
I was in Conway for the fourth announcement, which was the announcement that DXC Technology will be adding 1,200 new jobs to the 450 existing jobs at its Conway campus. That will bring total employment to nearly 1,700 over the next five years; DXC Technology will fill about 200 of those good-paying jobs in the next six months.
 
DXC employs 180,000 people in 70 countries globally. The company has many choices for expansion, but the leadership team chose Conway.  Andrea Fiumicelli, who is vice president and general manager of Healthcare and Life Sciences at DXC Technology, told me that the experience, skills, and dedication of the current DXC employees were a major factor in the decision.
 
He also cited our computer science initiative, the strength of our workforce, and the growth of the cybersecurity program at the University of Central Arkansas. UCA offers a bachelor of science in cybersecurity, and enrollment in the program has grown from five the first year to 57 this fall.
He recognized that our education system has created a pipeline of talent to industry.
 
So you see why I am excited about what is happening in Arkansas. Over ten days, we announced 1,500 new jobs and more than $300 million in investment in our state.
 
I have told the story that on my first day in office in 2015, I called the CEOs of six companies to ask them to consider opening a facility in Arkansas. As a result, Sig Sauer opened a plant in Jacksonville, and earlier this year, the company announced it was expanding again.
 
On the first day of my second term, I called six more CEOs. DXC Technology and HMS Manufacturing were among the companies I contacted. Ten months later, within a 10-day span, the two companies announced big plans for our state.
 
This success is directly related to the friendly business environment we’ve created in our state through the cooperation of the public and private sector. The foundation of it all, though, are the tens of thousands of the employees in our state who work so hard every day.
 
11-2-19 6:31 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.

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State Representative John Maddox's Weekly Column

 

On Monday morning, House members were informed of the passing of one of our fellow representatives.

 

Representative John Walker was elected to the House in 2010 and was serving his 5th term when he passed at the age of 82.

 

He represented District 34 which includes southwest portions of Little Rock. His public service career stretched far beyond the halls of the Capitol.

 

Walker attended Yerger High School in Hope until 1952 and continued his education at Jack Yates High School in Houston, Texas, where he graduated in 1954.

 

He was the first African American undergraduate student admitted to the University of Texas after the Brown decision in 1954 but was not allowed to attend for racial reasons.  He went on to earn his bachelor’s degree from Arkansas AM&N at Pine Bluff (now University of Arkansas Pine Bluff) in 1958 with a degree in sociology. Dr. Martin Luther King was the keynote speaker at his graduation.

 

Representative Walker earned his master’s degree from New York University and in 1964, he received a law degree from Yale Law School.

 

He embarked on his public service as an attorney soon after.  Walker’s first work was as an attorney with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund (LDF) in New York. In 1965, he opened the first integrated law firm in Arkansas, where he consistently worked to provide equal educational opportunities. Between 1965 and now, Walker has personally been involved in most of the reported racial discrimination cases in the state.

 

In 2017, Rep. Walker sponsored legislation Act 566, An Act to Create the Helping Our People Excel (H.O.P.E.) Act of 2017 which allowed the state to opt out of federal prohibitions on public assistance for those with drug convictions.

 

A service for Rep. Walker was held in the rotunda of the Capitol on Thursday. During the service, House Speaker Matthew Shepherd gave these words, “His sheer presence made our House stronger and our state better. Rep. Walker was one of those statesmen who spoke from experience rather than ego. He could vigorously oppose legislation in committee or on the floor, and immediately following adjournment would visit with those same members with whom he was in opposition to.  He was also someone who encouraged others.”

 

We mourn the loss of Rep. Walker and send our deepest condolences to his family and friends.

 

11-2-19 6:22 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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US Senator John Boozman's Weekly Column

Keep the Doors of Our Community Health Centers Open

 

Our health care system faces a number of challenges. Lack of access to affordable, quality care for many Americans is right at the top of the list. Washington’s inability to pass long-term funding for the nation’s community health centers (CHCs) threatens to exacerbate this problem.

 

CHCs provide low-cost health care to many of our nation’s most vulnerable citizens. More than 29 million patients, including over eight million children, are served at more than 11,000 sites nationwide. In Arkansas, there are more than 130 facilities that help nearly 200,000 people get the medical, dental, vision and behavioral health care services they need.

 

CHCs are an effective and cost-efficient solution in meeting the challenges to delivering affordable health care services. By providing a broad array of primary and preventative care services in a timely manner, community health centers help reduce costly, avoidable emergency department visits and extended hospital stays. This is especially true in rural America.

 

Nationwide, community health centers serve one in six people living in rural communities. For many of those individuals, CHCs provide health care that would otherwise be financially out of reach. In rural states like Arkansas, where provider shortages and expensive mandates limit services, CHCs are even more crucial to health care delivery.

 

These centers are often on the frontlines of the fight against our nation’s opioid epidemic. The majority of CHCs provide substance use disorder services, offering a chance to break the cycle of opioid addiction for uninsured and under-insured Americans who likely would have nowhere else to turn.

 

Perhaps most importantly, CHCs improve the health of those they serve while saving taxpayer dollars. On average, community health centers save over $2,300 per Medicaid patient and our health care system overall $24 billion each year.

 

CHCs receive federal support through the Community Health Center Fund (CHCF) which, in recent years, has only received short-term extensions. This puts access to quality care for millions of Americans in jeopardy every time the authorization’s expiration approaches. This is the predicament we find ourselves in once again.

 

I have joined a bipartisan group of senators to push for a long-term funding fix in an effort to solve this problem before it becomes a crisis again. We are calling for immediate passage of the Community Health Investment, Modernization, and Excellence (CHIME) Act of 2019 in order to prevent a disruption of care for those who use CHCs.

 

The CHIME Act would reauthorize funding CHCF for five years. If the CHCF expires, community health centers will lose 70 percent of their federal grant funding. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, this would cause an estimated 2,400 site closures, 47,000 lost jobs and threaten the health care of millions of Americans.

 

As small businesses, community health centers must have certainty to best serve the needs of their communities and patients. Some centers will soon have to take steps in anticipation of a funding lapse, including reducing staff and operating hours, cancelling capital projects or even preparing to close their doors. If the CHCF expires this month, community health centers will be unable to plan for the future and continue to better the health of their communities.

 

Community health centers have maintained strong support from both sides of the aisle for over fifty years. For this reason, I remain optimistic that we can pass the CHIME Act to provide certainty for CHCs and protect reliable and affordable health care access for millions of Americans. I will continue working to help fund this important element of health care delivery in Arkansas and across our nation.

 

11-1-19 1:17 p.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Street Closure For Ouachita Arts Celebration

 
The Ouachita Arts Celebration will be Saturday, November 2, 2019 in downtown Mena.
 
For event space and safety reasons, Mena Street will be closed from Sherwood Avenue to Port Arthur Avenue to through traffic Saturday from 7:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. 
 
Detours will be available.
 
Please drive with extra caution in the downtown area Saturday, and enjoy the event!
 
11-1-19 11:05 a.m. KAWX.ORG 
If you have local news tips or would like to place an item on our KAWX.ORG Community Calendar, email us at communityradio@live.com.
 

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Polk County Circuit Court Arraignments October 24th, 28th, 30th

All criminal information is merely an accusation and the Defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. Prosecuting Attorney Andy Riner, within and for the 18th-West Judicial District of the State of Arkansas, of which Polk County is a part, in the name and by the authority of the State of Arkansas, on oath, do hereby accuse the defendants of committing in Polk County, Arkansas the following crimes: 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Joshua Dean Fernandez, W/M ,age 33, Count I: theft By receiving, a Class "B" Felony. 
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Malcom Ryan Wells, W/M, age 33, Count I: Furnishing, Possessing, Or Using Prohibited Articles, a Class "C" Felony.
 
State of Arkansas Vs. Stephanie Abbott, W/F, age 39, Count I: Domestic Battery In The Third Degree, Subsequent Offense, a Class "D" Felony. Count II: Possession Of A Schedule II Controlled Substance, a Class "D" Felony.
 
11-1-19 10:45 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Senator Larry Teague's Weekly Column

 

State Capitol Week in Review From Senator Larry Teague

November 1, 2019

 

LITTLE ROCK – The Higher Education Coordinating Board heard a disappointing report about the continuing decline in the number of Arkansas high school graduates who go on to college.

 

During a recent special meeting, staff from the state Higher Education Department reported that only 47.1 percent of the high school seniors who graduated in 2018 went on to a four-year university or a two-year college.

 

Elected officials, business leaders and educators have been working over the past several years to increase the number of Arkansas students who eventually earn a degree. A better-educated workforce makes Arkansas more attractive to industries that compete the best in the modern global economy.

 

For that reason, the relatively low college-going rate is a disappointment.

 

What makes the report even more alarming is that it continues a steady decline from 2014, when 51.6 of our high school graduates went on to college. In 2015 the number dropped to 50.9 percent. In 2016 it fell to 49.8 percent and in 2017 it fell again to 48.2 percent.

 

The enrollment decline is mainly attributable to trends at four-year universities. In 2014, the number of high school graduates who went to an Arkansas university was 31.9 percent, and that ratio has steadily declined to 28.7 percent last year.

 

The percentage of high school graduates moving on to study at a two-year college has gone up and down, but remained close to 16 percent.

 

The number going to a private or independent college has dropped slightly since 2014, from 3 per cent to 2.4 percent of high school graduates.

 

It is difficult to make precise comparisons between the college-going rate in Arkansas and the national rate. That’s because the Arkansas statistics don’t include high school students from private schools, only students from public and charter schools. Also, it doesn’t account for students who leave the state to attend college.

 

National averages, derived differently, report that about 67 percent of high school graduates go on to college. That trend has held steady for several years.

 

In the spring of 2018, Arkansas public high schools graduated 31,745 seniors, of whom 14,965 went to a college or university in Arkansas.

 

Of the almost 15,000 graduating high school seniors, almost 2,000 went to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Almost 1,600 went to the University of Central Arkansas at Conway and almost 1,400 went to Arkansas Tech at Russellville.

 

About 1,100 graduating seniors enrolled at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, 768 enrolled at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith and 643 at Henderson State University in Arkadelphia. Another 555 of last year’s high school graduating class enrolled at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia.

 

Almost 900 went to Northwest Arkansas Community College and almost 600 enrolled at Arkansas State University at Beebe. Almost 500 went to the University of Arkansas Pulaski Tech.

 

Educators attributed some of the decline in college enrollment to the state’s relatively healthy economy. When jobs are available, young people tend to go to work instead of to college. Conversely, during tough economic times, more people go back to school in order to improve their job skills.

 

11-1-19 8:55 a.m. KAWX.ORG 

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Mena Weather